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THE BYE-ELECTION.

COMMENTS AND ANTICIPATIONS.

Despite the fact that the doings of our Royal visitors in the North -are monopolising much of the attention of the citizens, many speculations are being indulged in reepecting the coming bye-election, and the chances of election of those whose names are mentioned as probable candidates are keenly canvassed. Nothing definite has yet been decided by any of the political organisations in the city, but amongst well-infor-med people it is considered that Mr Charles T&ylor, who stood in the labour interest at last general election, will be the Government candidate, as well as the chosen of the labour party. The Trades and Labour Council will decide, at their meeting on Saturday night, upon the representative they will run, but in the meantime it js rumoured that it is possible that» surprise will be sprung, and an unexpected candidate chosen.

Amongst those who are looked upon as certain to stand is Mr T. E. Taylor, who, as formerly, will be the representative of the prohibition party. Many expect that, the contest will be practically a duel between the "two Taylors." Provided Mr T. E. Taylor does not stand, it is on the cards that Mr G. J. Smith will be announced as a candidate. Mr Smith, it is anticipated, would secure a large number of votes from the commercial community, and not a few Opposition votes in the absence of an Opposition candidate. The necessity for a prompt choice between Mr T. E. Taylor and Mr Smith is recognised, an«i in a day or two the matter may be decided.

Mr Robert Allan, President of the Industrial Association, was seen by a representative of "The Press" yesterday regarding the published statement that there was a probability that he would be a candidate. Mr Allan said that the statement was absolutely unauthorised. He had not Been asked to proffer himself, and even if he had he would not have consented, as his business demands his undivided attention, more especially after the large amount of time and attention he had devoted to the Jubilee Exhibition.

The resignation of Mr Lewis has been sprung as a surprise on the Opposition party in Christchurch, and, so far, nothing has been done as to deciding upon a candidate; in fact, it is not yet known if a candidate will be brought out. The names of a number of prominent Oppositionists have been mentioned, but, on being interviewed, they have disclaimed any intention or desire to seek the suffrages of the Christchurch electors. Amongst those mentioned is Sir George Clifford, but it is understood there is no authority for even stating that he would be willing to stand. It ie stated that there is a possibility of Mr A. H. Turnbull being a candidate, and that if he does go to the poll it will be as an Independent. Mr Turnbull is said to be muoh in favour with Trades' Unionists, and would also, probably, command! considerable support from the mercantile community. Others state that Mr Turnbull will come out as the approved Government candidate. Interviewed by a representative of "The Press," Mr Turnbull stated that the matter was one that required much consideration, but that, in all probability, he would have arrived at a decision by to-day. Already the Registrar of Electors has had numerous enquiries for forms of enrolment, and.it is evident that considerable interest is being taken in the approaching contest.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19010614.2.25

Bibliographic details

THE BYE-ELECTION., Press, Volume LVIII, Issue 10991, 14 June 1901

Word Count
572

THE BYE-ELECTION. Press, Volume LVIII, Issue 10991, 14 June 1901

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