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vYe deepiy regret to announce that at a . late hour last night, Henry Jacobs, D.D.. . v Dean of Christchurch, passed away. Death p was the result of a long course of paralytic ; w • h progression. I . -Henry Jacobs, D.D.. Dean of Christ- \ « church, was born at Chale Abbey, near St. | Catherine's, Isle of Wight, on the 3rd •. 0 January, 1824. At ten years of age he .t] was sent to Charterhouse School, London, ! b the headmaster of which at that time was ; s . the Rev- A. P. Saunders, D.D., afterwards ! : Dean of Peterborough. At seventeen he ;t' was captain of the school, and obtained by ; 0 competition an open exhibition, leading in j £ due course to a scholarship, and afterwards ! to a fellowship on t-h-3 Michel Foundation . at Queen's College, Oxford. Mr Jacobs , j matriculated in June, IS4I, and went into J residence at Oxford in October of the same ; J year. At the final examination at Easter, : t 1845, he obtained a first-class in classics *j with three other distinguished men, Thoma£ . t Arnold, Goldwin Smith, and James Riddel!, j t one of the most distinguished Greek ; r scholars in England. Having taken the j h B.A. .and M.A. degrees in due course, he t became in the year 1848 a Michel Fellow of ; Queen's College. He was ordained deacon j tin 1847 by the Bishop of Gloucester ar.d ] Bristol (Dr. Monk), and priest in 1848 by 'J the Bishop of Oxford (Dr. Wilberforce). j He was curate of All Saints, Poplar, Lon- ; * don. In June, 1850, he was appointed by , the Canterbury Association to the post of Classical Professor in the college which they j proposed to found in the Canterbury settle- ; i ment. j 1 Having arrived in Lyttelton in the Sir i 8 George Seymour on the 17th December, : 1850, he conducted the first service in Canterbury on the following Sunday. He also ( preached the sermon and conducted the str- 1 vice at'the opening of the first church on l the Plains, afterwards St. Michael's, Christ- j church, July, 1851. Christ's College Gram- i mar School "was opened by him as the first . t head master on the 26th April, 1852. On ; t May 21st, 1855 he was appointed Sub-War- I den" in the Deed of Foundation of the Col- J lege, and shortly after, Watts-Russell Pro- ! i fessor of Divinity. He resigned the head ; t mastership in 1363, and was nominated In- j cumbent of the Parish of Christchurch. : < The Bishopric of Nelson was offered him ! \ by the Synod of that Diocese in 1864, on ! the resignation of Bishop Hobhouse, but : < was declined. He was appointed Archdea- j con of Christchurch in the same year, and . .gave up this office on being made Dean of -, Christchurch in June 1866. By the clergy \ of the liocese he had been elected one of the t clerical representatives to the General . j Synod at every meeting of that body from , 1865 onward. In 1873 he resigned the cure j of St. Michael and All Angels, Christ- . church; and in May, 1876, was appointed ' for the second time Archdeacon of Christ- j church, which office he has since held in j conjunction with that of Dean. j - In 1878, the Bishop of Christchurch, hay- ; ' ing gone to England to attend the Lambsth Congress, the Dean, as his commissary, was : called upon to at the annual meet- , ; ing of the Diocesan Synod. At the close of | ' the session he was presented by the clergy j ] and laity with a cheque to cover the cost I . of the fees for taking the D.D. decree at ; - Oxford. In addition to the appointments ■ ( already mentioned, the Dean had been ex- j amining chaplain to Bishop Harper since ; ' 1856. in October', 1872, he accepted the , 1 office of editor of the " New Zealand Church ' News," at the request of the Church Work 1 Extension Committee of the Diocesan , ' Synod. j < Dean Jacobs was the author of- \ i several publications, the principal ones \ i being "The Day of Small Things," a sermon preached at the opening of the first church and school at Christchurch, July 20th, 1857 ; a letter to the Right Rev. H. L. Jenner, D.D., in reply to his pamphlet entitled "The See of Dunedin, N.Z., etc."; "A History of the New Zealand Church." one of a series of diocesan histories published by the S-P.C.K. ; "A Lay of the Southern Cross, and other Poems"; and sundry other sermons and pamphlets. In lt>9l the Dean visited England, and returnea much refreshed. Paralysis set in subsequently, however, attacking first the legs, and 'then running up the left side of the body, nntil deatn resuluted. Dean Jacobs gave up his duties at the Cathedral a considerable time ago. For some time, however, he attended the week day evening and Sunday morning services at the Cathedral, being wheeled in a chair which was taken into the Cathedral and placed near the pulpit. For the last eight or nine months he was seriously ill, and was fully conscious only at intervals. About a week ago, however, he became totally unconscious, and it was then seen that "the end was near. He remained in this condition until yesterday morning, when a further change for the worse took place. He died at about 11 o'clock last night. Dean Jacobs was married twice. He had a son by his first wife, but the boy died while young, and the mother followed him. A year after the death of his first wife the Dean married his present wife, who was a daughter of the late Mr Frederick Thompson, well known to nil the old settlers. He had eight children by bis second wife, two sons and six daughters, all of whom are still living. The elder son is at present on a station out in the country, the second son has only returned recently fro mSouth Africa. The Cathedral bell will be tolled this morningThe funeral will take place on Saturday afternoon, and the interment will bs at the Barßadoea street Cemetery

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DEATH OF DEAN JACOBS. Press, Volume LVIII, Issue 10884, 7 February 1901

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