Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

JOTTINGS.

Juat before Colonel Baden-Powell ldfc England he was interviewed by ah old Army man, who wished him God' Speed. "It will be all right," said the Colonel; "all I hope ie that they will give mc "a warm comer." The Colonel's wSh appears to have been fully realised. The origin of tho names of some of.the towns in Cape Colony and Natal which are at present so prominently attracting public attention are of interest. Durban is named from Sir Benjamin Durban, who was Governor of the Cape in 1834. Grahams* town and Harrismitti are named respectively from military commanders—Colonel Graham and Colonel Sir Harry Smith. Caledon,, Beaufort, Somerset, and Cradock are named from former Governors—the Eaxl of Caledon, Lord Charles Somerset, and Sir John Cradock (Lord Howden). The towns of Ladysmith, Port Elizabeth, and Lady Grey. are called, after tho wives of Cape Governor!. < Kimberley is named after the Earl of Kimbetley, who- was Colonial, Secretary from 1870 to 1874, when that town advanced .. from the position of a mushroom camp to that of a x>erov<ment mining centre. It is recognised, says a London military writer, that there will not be enough colo- - nial troops in South Africa to form a separate general's command. It is now intended that the contingents shall be attached'to different brigades or divisions—probably the « Australians to the Ist Division, and. the Canadian Contingent to the 2nd Division. The men. are to have a fair chance of being at the front. . .

It wae remarkable what an: effect tfaei calling up' of the reserves had upon the recruiting establishments in Central .London. Hundreds of young men were eager to join, and they had to be passed in to the examining officers in batches of ten at a time; Some of the recruits were no doubt very juvenile, but most passed the standard. To be a millionaire has its disadvantage*. Mr J. B. Robinson, supposed to be the richest man in South Africa, -happens to be a burgher of the Transvaal. * Under the new Transvaal law, which enables the Government to confiscate the property of absentee burghers, injunction wae conveyed to Mr Robinson to return to the Transvaal and do his duty as » burgher, otherwise all his property would be annexed by the Government.

Magersfontein, near Kimberfey, which -was lately occupied by the Boess, is the beautiful estate of Mr John Bisset, whose hospitality has been enjoyed by large numbere of visitors from all over the world. > Peshepe the finest shooting in. Sotrtf* Afrfahi is to be obtained, on the, estate* ~■ Mr, Bieeefc is a very enterprising and ostrich and stock farmer, arid, aatasitetitag troublottf event*, recently removed, all. his efcock to safer quarters in Kimberiejr. A portion of ilia homestead is situated wathia ti» Free Stale border, the remainder being; in colonial territory, the border line running «hroug£ the building. ' , 'V » M. Paul de Cassagnac, in the "Autowte,' regrets that -white a German and oo iridb legion have been organised to figkb for the Boers, not a single Frenchmaai has demanded the favour of bekjg allowed to perforate «n Englidbanan on the coming twttiliaieidt.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18991128.2.27.35

Bibliographic details

JOTTINGS., Press, Volume LVI, Issue 10514, 28 November 1899

Word Count
518

JOTTINGS. Press, Volume LVI, Issue 10514, 28 November 1899

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working