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OBITUARY.

MR E. SANDFORD.

A large number of our readers will learn with regret that the death occurred yesterday of Mr E. Sandford, who for a short period was one of Christchurch's representatives in Parliament. Mr Sandford was forty-nine years of age, and came to the colony early in the seventies. He settled at Mornington, a suburb of Dunedin, where he remained for a few years. He then went to Arrowtown, where he conducted the Arrowtown Observer, and had the misfortune to be burnt out. He then went to Invercargill, and some thirteen years ago came to Christchnrch, during the most of which time he was employed as a compositor at the Lyttelton Times office. In December, 1891, he was returned at the by-election as a representative for Christchurch to fill the vacancy caused by the appointment of Mr (now Sir) W. B. Perceval to the AgentGeneralship for the colony. At the succeeding general election Mr Sandford was anions; the defeated candidates. About this time also his eyesight began to fail him. He was unable to regularly follow his ordinary avocation and accepted the offer of a position in the Public Works Department here where he was engaged up to the time of his death. He was a Wesleyan and had taken an active part in the work of the church in j the south and here. He was a member of the Typographical Association, and a trustee of one of the local Druid lodges. His death l was comparatively sudden. He was stricken with influenza last Saturday, and suffered I more or less up to yesterday when it turned to severe inflammation of the lungs. He leaves a widow and family of eight, two of whom are married, to mourn their loss.

A very painful impression was caused yesterday when it became known that two old and much respected Christchurch residents, Charles Robinson, a major in the Salvation Army, and Mrs Vince, wife of Major Vince, also of the Salvation Army, were dead. The news was cabled by Commandant Booth, who has charge of the Salvation Army in Australasia, to Brigadier Hoskin, commanding Salvation Army operations in this colony. Their deaths took place in Melbourne on Thursday night, and the double funeral will be conducted by Commandant Booth to-day. Major Robinson leaves a wife and seven children, while Mrs Vince leaves her husband with, two children. As will be seen elsewhere, a memorial service will be held in the Victoria street Barracks to-morrow night, directed by Brigadier Hoskin, who will be accompanied by his full staff. A memorial service, in the shape of " a vacant chair" meeting, ii to take place in the Salvation Army barracks, East belt, Linwood, to-morrow evening.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18971218.2.80

Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Press, Volume LIV, Issue 9913, 18 December 1897

Word Count
452

OBITUARY. Press, Volume LIV, Issue 9913, 18 December 1897

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