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ATHLETIC NOTES.

*' Weekly Press and Referee."

[Br Vaox.ter.Jl

A recent issue of the Bundaberg Guardian says :—" It appears as if most people accept that Maorilander's pole jump of lift as the record of the colony. Well, ' Jack' Molloy, of Ipswich, skipped over a stick risen lift 4in above the ground, at a sports gathering held at Sandy Gallop some years back, while a Southern vanlter, whose name this-paper-forgets, cleared lift Bin. Vaulting although one of the prettiest feats is not generally popular." A two mile- handicap was decided at the Agricultural Ground, Sydney, on June sth, under the auspices of the Ash field Harriers, when 23 runners started but only nine went the full distance, the winner turning up in C. D. Jones (145 yds), W. Lorrimer (150 yds) being second and S. W. York (scr) third. Time, lOmin 45see.

It is no good disguising the fact that much dissatisfaction has been expressed on every hand at the wretched time-keeping at the recent inter-Warsity sports (says " Alma Mater" in the Athletic News). The awful hash made in the Three Miles was bad enough; but this was not all, for most experienced clockista ditiered from the official times given in several other events. Five watches made 'Jordan, do 49|j for the Quarter, and several "even time," and as FitzKerbert was utterly used up fifty yards from home they were about correct. I myself, with one of Dent's chronographs, made him do *j)§ exactly. Then Gamier was clocked byHaaost of us to do 16*_ec, instead of 16|sec, as officially given ; and I merely state _3 a fact that the three miles was given 83 14mm 47£* ec, whereas it oesugiod a lot oves Isu__k * 'grea Aitb

most folk concerned that for the future greater care must be taken in this direction. It is not only very rough upon the exponents themselves to be clocked wrongly, but a monstrous thing at such an important meeting. It is still a topic in 'Varsity circles, and with athletes generally also. A Sydney writer says that H. B. Rowlands, the crack high jumper, having finished his studies at Sydney University returns to his home at Ipswich, Queensland. ( The champion Gra?co-Roinan wrestler, Tom Cannon (saya London Mirror of Life of April 14th), has elected once more to seek fresh woods and pastures new, where, by his indomitable courage and determination, he will endeavour to subdue all aspirants who may oppose him for the proud title of champion. Last Friday evening Cannon passed a little time with his Liverpool friends, many of whom saw him off to Southampton by %he midnight tram, his destination being Johannesburg, South Africa. The gladiator was in the best of health and spirits. A point has arisen in America as to whether coaches or instructors of athletes who receive expenses only in return for their services can be considered amateur athletes (says a Sydney writer). It arose thusly. Two prominent American athletes, Fred Puffer and E. W. Goff, of the 22nd Regiment Athletic Club, were, at the termination of a recent military tournament, protested against on the grounds that they were paid instructors of athletes at a school. The case was investigated by the Protest Committee of the Metropolitan Associatiou of the Amateur Athletio Union of the United States, and this body came to the conclusion that it was perfectly satisfied that the men were only paid their expenses, and received no salary for their instructorship. The committee concluded its report thusly : —" We know of no case of a disqualification on grounds cited, and, after careful consideration, conclude that ' coaching,' where no compensation is received other than legitimate expenses, does not violate our rules.'" The report came before the board of managers of the Association in due course for confirmation. After a lengthy discussion it was decided by 13 votes to 3 to declare Puffer and' Goff professionals, thus ignoring the report of the committee. The decision is an important one, and is likely to affect the amateur status of several prominent American athletes.

At the Bolton Wanderer's professional sports on April 24th, F. E. Bacon (Champion of England) and G. B. Tincler (Craig) met in the Mile Scratch Race, the other competitors being H. Watkins and T. Conchie. Tincler led to within fifty yards from the tape, when Bacon asserted himself, eventually winning by two yards in 4min 32sec. The third nian, Conchie, was sixty yards away, while Watkins pulled up a lap from home. The first money was £20, second £3, and third £2.

The Victorian Amateur Athletic Association has passed a resolution prohibiting the purchase of trophies from any official of the association or any member of the council. This because of allegations that jewellers and others allied themselves with the sport for the purpose of doing business. Commenting on my note with reference to the probability, of Holder crossing over to Sydney in August in view of the Australasian Championship meeting, "Prodigal," in the Sydney Referee says :—" If this news is correct, it would appear that the Wanganui ped. means to take no chances, for six or seven weeks in Sydney in which to train assiduously would give him a great advantage over our men, who naturally have to confine their attention to their businesses. Lucky man to be able to afford the time and the money to come along on his own."

The Wellington A.A.C. have now a membership of nearly 150. The receipts for last season amounted to £221, including £32 won by members at the Caledonian Sports held in January and a balance of £19 7s from the previous season. The year's transactions resulted in a slight loss, there now being £11 10s 7d to credit.

"It has been freely asserted (writes a London correspondent) that Oxford and Cambridge will be strongly represented at the next Amateur Athletic Championship Meeting in July. lam afraid certain folk are jumping to conclusions again. There may be one, perhaps two, entries from the 'Varsities this year, but even of these I have my donbts.\ The fact: is, after a long spell of work from October to March, Light and Dark Blues fight shy of training again unless for a University tussle proper. When the Championships were held earlier in the year the position was reversed, as 'Varsity men were in rare fettle, whereas Metropolitan and other-athletes were hardly ever wound up. Who will forget tbe universal sensation when B. Wise, of Oxford University, beat W. G. George over the latter's favourite distance of a mile ? ' Up to last year, University men had ample cause for refraining from competition at the Championship Meeting. Since the cleansing of the Augean stable by the A.A.A., however, there is no outside reason why' they should not do so. It would be to the advantage of athletics generally if old-time hostilities prevailed. Yet, save CR. Thomas (Oxford) and H. F. Howard (Cambridge), who may compete, the strength of the 'Varsities will prove more apparent than real, I fancy." The long-looked-for 440 yds match between Downer and Bredin for £200 and the championship, was brought off at Rochdale on May Ist, w.hen there was an attendance of 15,000. i There was considerable excitement over the race in pedestrian circles from the fact that the men met some time back at Bolton to contend at 400 yds (says an English paper). On that occasion Downev got the best of the start, and at one time was six yards in front. Bredin on entering the straight, however, reduced the gap to a couple of yards, by which distance Downer won. Bredin was much the fresher of the two at the finish of the race, and he thought he would have caught Downer in another forty yards. Hence the present match. The track at Rochdale has better corners than the one at Bolton, and Bredin being a bigger man than' his opponent stood a better chance 'of getting round them than he did at Bolton. Bredin has been training at Reading under the care of S. Fritty, and arrived at Rochdale on the Wednesday before the match. Local feeling was very strong on account of Bredin defeating Mills so easily at Rochdale. Downer has been in good condition all the winter, and has taken his breathings at Ormskirk. He has been paying speoial attention to getting hid stamina right, having practised ball punching for some time. He arrived at Rochdale at noon on the day of the match. Elaborate preparations had'been made at the grounds to prev_nt a similar break in of the crowd on the course as they did in the Bredin and Mills race, admission being by ticket only. Bredin was the favourite, 7 to 4 being laid on his chance of success before the start. Bredin won the toss and selected the inside position. Both men got well away, but Downer being the quickest to get into his stride, took th* inside position after going twenty yards, and soon was a couple of yards to the good. At the half distance Downer had increased his lead to five yards. Entering the straight, fifty yards from home, -Bredin got within a yard of his opnonent, and looked like getting on terms. This, however, he failed to do, and Downer increased his lead again, and won amidst a scene of enthusiasm by three yards. Time, 49f sec. Downer was quite exhausted when he finished, and lay on the grass for a minute, or so, whilst Bredin seemed much the fresher and walked straight off the course.

The ex-amateur running races are proving great attractions to the Midlands and North of England, and on May Bth, at Rochdale, there was a big crowd to witness the £200 match at ten miles between the famous longdistance runners, F. E. Bacon and George Crossland. In 1895 Bacon won the ten miles amateur championship in 52rain 43_aec, and last year Crossland woo in 52min Ssec. The weather was far from satisfactory, and during the match there was a nasty wind blowing. Bacon arrived" on the ground first and was made favourite, hia supporters laying 13 to 8 on him. From the start Crossland went to- the front, cutting out the pace. From this point until Bacon made his effort the positions remained almost the same. Bacon followed a couple of yards behind his rival, the first mile taking smin 12fs»c. At four and three-quarter miles Bacon ran up to Crossland, hut soon fell back again. Crossland increased the pace but could not get away, although straining every- nerve. About 380 yds from the finish Bacon put in that wonderful spurt of his, and, pzasing Crossland, rapidly went away from him* winning finally by quite 40yds in s_min 38§sec. The record for ten miles is Simla b_sec. The priaoitfAl event a% the Horiey A.o.'»

spring meeting on May Ist, was a 100 yds Scratch Invitation Race, the final heat of which was won by H. C. Woodyatt (London A.C.), who got hesae first by a yard from R. Wadley (Goldsmiths' Institute) ia lOJsec.

The lOOyds Scratch Invitation Rao* at the Notts . Forest Football Club's Sports at Trent Bridge, Nottingham, on May Ist, was won by J. W. Bradley (Huddersfield), with A. V. Edwards (Forest F.C.) second, and S. R. Huson (South London Harriers) third. Time, 10 feec.

The 440 yds Northern Counties Champion, ship was decided at lhe Burnley C.C. Sports at Turf Moor on May Ist, when there were three starters, and S. Elliott (Goldsmiths' Institute) won easily by three yards from F. Morrell (Salford Harriers) in 51f.sec. C. S. Sydenham won the Four Miles Invitation Scratch Race at the Essex Beagles Sports at Barking on May Ist, m 20mm sJsec, C. Bennett (Finchley Harriers) being a good second, only being beaten by a couple of yards. W. J. Sturgess, the amateur champion walker, took part in the Two Mile Walking Handicap, but although he was timed to do l-oiin 47seo he only gained filth place, the winner being K. J. Topple (150 yds), who got home first by 10yds m 13min 30|sec. On May Bth W. J. Sturgess finished second from soratch to T. O'Gorraan (380 yds) in the Two Mile Walking Handicap at the Polytechnic Harriers' Spring Meeting at Wembley Park, the champion being timed to do 13min 43sec.

I The death is announced in England of R. Williamson, who some ten years or so ago was one of the best known professional runners in England. C. H. Kilpatrick, the American champion half mile runner, took part in the Half Mil* Handicap at the Leeds A.C.'s meeting on May Bth, but he failed to gain a place. The second annual match between Harvard and Pennsylvania Universities was held at Cambridge, Mass., on May Bth, whea the former won by 57 points to 55 points. In the 880 yds G. W. Orton finished second, but he was disqualified for fouling Fenno, who finished third, otherwise Pennsylvania would have won. Some capital performances were recorded during the contests. Hoffman, (P.) won the 100 yds in lOsec, and tho 220 yds in 22gsec, E. Hollister (H.) the 440 yds in SOJsec, and the 880 yds in lmin 57_»sec, Q" W. Orten the Mile in 4min 31|sec, F. B. Fox (H.) the 120 yds Hurdles in 16|sec, and W. G. Morse (H.) the 220 yds Hurdles in 25§seo, and W. B. Fetterman (P.) the Mile Walk in 7min 13$ sec. The field events were also well contested. In the High Jump J. D. Windsir (P.) cleared 6ft 2*ia ;J. P. Remington (P.) won the Long Jump with 22ft Bin, W. W. Hoyt (H.) the Pole Jump with lift, J. C. McCraken the Putting the Shot with 40ft 6iin, and W. G. Woodruff (P.) Throwing the Hammer with 134 ft llin.

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Bibliographic details

ATHLETIC NOTES., Press, Volume LIV, Issue 9763, 26 June 1897

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2,297

ATHLETIC NOTES. Press, Volume LIV, Issue 9763, 26 June 1897

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