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ENGLISH SPORTS AND PASTIMES.

Sp-CTauvv WB*rrr_**ir fob thx Nsw

ZIALAXD R_F_R__.

[By "Verax."]

London, April 24. We had glorious spring weather for the Epsom Spring Meeting and the coarse has seldom looked better. Naturally I felt considerable interest in the first day's racing as Paris HI was engaged in the Metropolitan Stakes. After his runaway victory a Northampton, Paris was regarded as a good thing for the Metropolitan, but I warned several people that it was doubtful if the little fellow would quite get the distance. It is pleasant to drive down to Epsom when you get the chance and I was lucky enough for this. It is much more enjoyable to sit behind a team of good horses and inhale the refreshing breezes, instead of being cooped up in a stuffy railway carriage with a variety of people you don't know, and would never have any

pleasure in knowing. There was almost as large a crowd on the downs on City and Suburban day as I have seen on Derby day, and royalty was represented in the Prince of Wales and Prince Christian, and also tlie Duko of Cambridge. The stands were all well filled, and most of the private boxes. On Tuesday the Great Metropolitan

Stakes brought out a good field, considering the distance—about two miles and a quarter.

There were fifteen runners, and Paris opened

out in the betting at _f*to 1. He was heavily backed, but there was always plenty of money to be had at this price. Still, the

layers were never inclined to increase the odds, and they evidently Were somewhat

afraid of the Nort__tnpton form being repeated. J. Watts had the mount on Paris, as he is nearer the weight than Morny Cannon, who rode Opera Glass. Loribeet, a five-year-old with only 7st 71b to carry, was next in demand to Paris at 9 to 2. Dormeuse was well backed, also Fatherless and Opera Glass. Paris looked all right and moved well in the preliminary. He also ran what I consider a good

race for two miles, but the last quarter

mile found him out, and Watts judiciously eased him. Paris was handy all the way

round to Tattenham corner. At this point in the race he was going so well, and pulling

freely, that the race looked won, and his

backers commenced to rejoice. He was leading down the hill with Dormeuse,-' with Vie, Fatherless, and Opera Glass going well. Just a quarter of a mile from home Paris and Dormeuse collapsed, and when Fatherless challenged, there was no answer. No sooner had Paris done pulling than he stopped racing, and I have seen him do the same thing at Randwick. Watts saw it was no use riding him out, and this was a good plan to adopt in view of his later

engagement at Chester

Fatherless came

right on and won by a length and a-half from The Rays with Fiesole third. Then

came Opera Glass, Dormeuse and Paris in

order. The time was 4min 13ssc. Fatherless, the winner, is a bay horse by Isonomy —Orphan Agnes, and he was ridden by J.

Woodburn and trained by Jarvis. He was bred by Mr C. D. Rose, who is a firm believer in stayers. This was the horse's first race this year. Had the distance been a mile and a half I verily believe Paris would have won easily with his 9st 91b. As it was he ran a good horse. Before briefly alluding to some of the minor events I will deal with the City and Suburban on Wednesday. * The crowd was greater than on Tuesday, and as the

favourite won the big race general backers

i-aust have done well v ; v M. Cannon has had an extraordinary run of bad luck. Since he rode Cloraine in the Lincoln Handicap he

has ridden loser after lo3er, and some of them heavily backed. One gentleman fond of making calculations estimates that, starting with a pound and doubling on every race on Cannon's mounts would have totalled up to a loss of about six millions. Nice for followers of jockeys' mounts. However, Cannon had a spell from losing on Wednesday as he rode Wor-

cester to victory in the City and Suburban, and the public gave him a real good cheer. There were sixteen starters for the race, and Worcester went out at 9to 2. La Sagesse was backed for such a lot of money at the finish that she started at 100 to 14, a good second favourite. Tambour at Bto 1

had many backers. Hebron stood at 20 to 1, and Amandier at 25 to 1. Indian Queen and La Sagesse ran well for a mile, and here Worcester got the better of Tambour, and soon had the race won. Amandier made a fruitless effort to catch the favourite, who held his own and won easily by three lengths. Hebron was a

fair third. Then came Tambour, Kirkconnel and Red Heart. The owner of Worcester

is Mr Barnato, who is at present in South Africa, where he has been interviewing President Kruger. Worcester was purchased for the mining millionaire for 2000gs by Lord Marcus Beresford. He is trained by J. Cannon, who turned the horse out in splendid condition. Cannon rode the winner of this race last year and also on Reve dOr and Nunthorpe in 1890 and 1891. Worcester

is by Saraband—Elegance, 6yrs old, and he carried Bst 121b. The time was 2min Usee, but the course is aboutA mile and a quarter.

To refer to some of the. other events, the Westminister Plate on Tuesday was won by Mrs Langtry with Amphibia, a chestnut filly by Amphion—Blavatsky, who beat Sea Mist and Bayolia. The Widow's Daughter, owned by Captain F. Forrester, was a hot

favourite, bufr ran&adly. Mrs Langtry is reported to have had a big win over Amphibia, who star ted. second favourite at 7 .to 1. Sea Mist is owned by Tom Cannon, and Bayolia by the Duke of Devonshire. The Lincoln form showed up well when Quarrel beat Gala Day easily in the Prince of Wales's Stakes. Odds of 6 to 4 were laid on the winner. Grafton Belle won the Tattenham Plate, and was sold to Mr C. G. Merry for 510g3. The stake was worth 197sovs. Newmarket, by Trapeze, landed the Barstead Plate, and was bought in for 400gs. The Great Surrey Handicap was a grand race, as Royal Rose, ridden by Allsopp, beat the favourite. Ugly, ridden by Cannon, by a neck, and Pardalo was only a head away, third.

On Wednesday Mr L. de Rothschild won the Copthorne Plate with Fro ward, by Brag. In the Betchworth Stakes the Duke of Devonshire won with Farouche, who is well bred, being by Galliard out of a mare hy Hermit—Controversy. Farouche was bought in for 380gs. In The Tartar, Sir John Thursby has a wonderfully useful horse. He won the Woodmansterne Plate easily from Col. North's Prince Barcaldine. The Tartar won this race last year. Gold Belt, by Bendigo— Crucible, found a purchaser for -2030vs after winning the Kingswood Stakes. Fortalice won the Hyde Park Plate for Lord Ellesmere, and CoL North scored a win in the last race, the Tedworth Plate, with King Hampton, by Merry Hampton. On Tuesday there were long delays at the post, but on Wednesday Mr A. Coventry got the horses away quicker.

Both Persimmon and Regret have been scratched for the Two Thousand, the reason being that neither of them are forward enough, and yet we have had such an ex tremely mild winter, one would have thought there could have been no excuse on this score. Regret was tried at Kingsclere this week, and finished Last. Tho trial took place in

the presence of the Duke of Westminster and others. The scratching of the Prince's horse and Regret clears the way for St. Frusquin, who seems to have a very easy task set him to win the Two Thousand. If anything did happen to put down St. Frusquin, which appears well-nigh impossible, then the bottom would be knocked out of the Derby market. [St. Frusquin won.—Ed.]

Baron Hirsch died this week. He suc- | cumhed to apoplexy at one of his vast country residences on the Continent. He was an extraordinary man, and perhaps the most liberal in charitable deeds of any man of our time. He made his immense wealth by driving keen bargains and by shrewd speculations, but when he acquired millions he spent millions. As a racing man Baron Hirsch's colours were, more familiar on the racecourse than the Baron. The best animal he ever owned was La Fleche, a wonderful mare. All the money lie won in stakes went to the charities. The Prince of Wales was hispersonalfriend, but Baron Hirsch had very little regard for some of the titled men who occasionally partook of his hospitality, and then afterwards abused him behind his back. He was never on intimate terms with the Rothschilds, and despised those of his own countrymen who were grasping and greedy in amassing money. Baron Hirsch is stated to have left many millions of money behind him, and his nephew will probably come in for a fair share. By the death of the Baron many nominations become void, but nothing to make any difference in the classic events. Many poor people will miss Baron Hirsch. When asked, after his son's death, who was his heir, he is stated to have replied "suffering humanity.'' If this be true, no doubt " sxiffering humanity" will inherit under his will. There are many men holding their heads a good deal higher than Baron Hirsch who would have been much less missed had thejdeparted this life instead of the Baron. There was a report at Sandown yesterday that Baron Hirsch's wealth totalled £30,000,000.

Sandown Park Races yesterday drew a [ great crowd to the Esher slopes, and for the big race, the Tudor Plate, of lOOOsovs, there was a clinking finish. The favourite was Imposition owned by Mr de Rothschild, and he went out at odds of 11 t0.4 against. Shaddock, in the same stable as Regret, was well backed, also Atheliath and Lord Hervey. The winner got shut in, and it seemed almost impossible for him to get out, but T. Loates rode a great finish, and Imposition beat Lord Hervey, who finished in front of Shaddock. The race was for three-year-olds over a mile, and the form shown by Imposition enhances St. Frnsquin's chance in the big events. The Walton Two-year-old race of lOOOsovs, wa3 won by Pretty Rose, who started at an outside' price, T. Cannon's Magnificent s.cond and Holy Friar third. The favourite, Sardine, failed to get a place. Madden rode the winner, who won by four lengths. Mr McCalmont scored a win in the Juvenile Selling Plata with a filly by Donovan —Margory Moovpoint, who started at 7 to 4, and was ridden by M. Cannon. Campion won the Trial Piate. The Princess of Wales's Handicap, of 500sovs, went to Devil-May-Care, who carried 7st lib and beat Soothsayer (7st 71b) and Cardonald (Bst 61b). The winner is a smart three-year-old. Red Hat won the last race, the Guildford Handicap. It was a rattling good day's sport.

On the course there was some betting on future events, aud Clorane was favourite at 6 to 1 for the Kempton Jubilee Stakes, Victor Wild and Whittier being backed at 8 and 10 to 1. The meeting of these three hor3e3 over a mile will be a treat, and I hope to see it. For the Two Thousand 3to 1 was laid on' St. Frusquin, and 5 to 4 against him for the Derby was accepted. Knight of the Thistle is now second favourite for the Newmarket race, Galeazzo also beiug backed.

At Ludlow Spring Meeting I was glad to hear Mr Gollon had another win with Ebor. I think he has acted wisely in running Ebor for these smaller races as they are certainly worth winning. Ebor carried list 51b and won the County Steeplechase, 250sovs, beating Exodus, lOst 81b and Roland Grceme, lOst lib, and starting at 3to 1. I fancied Ebor would pay for his oats and if Norton picks up he will also be handy if hsre another season.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18960615.2.12

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH SPORTS AND PASTIMES., Press, Volume LIII, Issue 9443, 15 June 1896

Word Count
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ENGLISH SPORTS AND PASTIMES. Press, Volume LIII, Issue 9443, 15 June 1896

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