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The Press. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1896. MR J. L. SCOTT'S RETIREMENT.

It will be seen from an, announcement, in another column that Mr. J. L. Scott has definitely retired from tbs' contest for the Christchureh seat. Wβ, fancy he was taken somewhat at a disadvantage by the deputation whowaited on him a short time ago, and consented to stand rather against his better judgment. However this may be, an unexpected contingency has now arisen in his business and domestic relations, which would make it very inadvisable for him to leave Christchureh, as it would j be necessary for him to do if he were elected to Parliament, and consequently he has felt compelled to withdraw from the field. We have no doubt that his retirement will b9 a great disappointment to the Government. Mr. Scott is a man of moderate views, who would have gained the support of some who are by no means prepared to swallow all the " fads" of the present Ministry, while he possesses personal qualities which would have secured him the votes of others, quite irrespective of politics. The Government may have a difficulty in securing a suitable candidate to take his place. As regards Mr. Scott himself, we feel inclined to congratulate him on getting free from a position which, in the end, he would probably have found uncongenial and irksome. We cannot believe that a man so little imbued with Socialistic doctrines as he is, would have submitted without repugnance to the political company he would have had to keep, and the views he would have had to swallow.

We fear that one result of the present development will be that we shall again see Government playing with the Christchurch constituency to suit their own convenience. For months after they: had decided to appoint Mr. Reeves Agent-General, they kept the matter stringing on because they could not find a candidate to their liking to take his place. When at last they made up their minds, they had driven it so late that Mr. Reeve3's departure savoured more of flight or an elopement than the dignified farewell of a Minister of the Crown going Home to represent the colony in London. Mr. Reeves's resignation is now in the hands of the Governor, and Mr. Reeves himself has left the shores of New Zealand. But for Mr. Scott's retirement the writ would have been issued yesterday. Now we suppose the Government will keep the matter dilly-dallying for an indefinite time, while they fish round for another candidate. We say that this is treating the electors of Christchurch with scant consideration or respect. The seat is now vacant, and they are entitled to have it filled up as soon as possible. In any case they have a right to know definitely when they are to be permitted to have a voice in the matter. . The Government should get the writ issued without delay. and in the meantime we beg

to repeat our advice to our readers to register at once, if they have not already done so.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18960115.2.22

Bibliographic details

The Press. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1896. MR J. L. SCOTT'S RETIREMENT., Press, Volume LIII, Issue 9314, 15 January 1896

Word Count
510

The Press. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1896. MR J. L. SCOTT'S RETIREMENT. Press, Volume LIII, Issue 9314, 15 January 1896

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