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ROUND THE WORLD.

M. Leopold de Rothschild must be the happiest racing man in England. Ho is the owner of the favorite for tho next English Derbj-, and is also the leading winning owner of the season. When the mail left before the close of the English racing season, M. Rothschild's famous sire, St. Simon, by Galopin, was by nearly £10,000 at top of the tree, his record being 35 wins and £30,486 in prizes, the champion colt St. Frusquin being responsible with six victories for £9,537, Florizel 11. coming next with the same number of wins and a total prize money of £4,359. Barcaldine, by Solon, was second on the list with 29 wins and £20,654 prize money, Sir Visto, with two victories, being responsible for £10,025, while Marco, winner of the Cambridgeshire Stakes, was credited with £4,212 for five wins. Isonomy, who was third on the list with £18,464 for 23, had to thank Le Var and Isinglass principally for his exalted position, the single victory of the former being of the value of £8,995, and of the latter £2,520. Speculation has already commenced in England over the Derby to be run at Epsom in June, 1896. St. Frusquin, by St. Simon, whose record as a two-year-old has been such a brilliant one, was immediately installed as favourite after Mb marvellous performances in the Dewhurst Plate, in which he left his opponents as if they were standing. After j that race, the excitement following which was described in the English press as unsurpassed at famous Newmarket, an enthusiastic patron of the stable tore madly through the ring crying out—'* I'll take £3,000 to £1,000 the colt for the Derby." The price was not forthcoming, but at the London Club on! October 29th he was heavily backed at 11 to ] 4, and should he winter well he seen.3 bound to start a hot favourite for the Blue Riband. ' The bay colt Regret, a descendant of the celebrated Kingsclere, whowon theHoughton Stakes at Newmarket in a canter, and, is regarded by his party as a second Ormonde,) came with a rattle in the. market the same 1 evening, and when the mail left was quoted at ; 5 to 1, Persimmon being next best favourite; at 6to 1. The sporting critics anticipate 1 some brilliant battles next season between) this aristocratic trio. St. Frusquin stands) out without doubt as a marvellous colt, his [ performances in the Dewhurst and Middle I Park Plates stamping him as by far the best two-year-old of the season. Regret is described as an indifferent colt to look at, but the critics nevertheless pay deference to the opinions of his party, who console themselves by the reflection that the champion Ormonde was not at all of taking appearance when he first came into prominence. St. Frusquin,s only defeat during the season was in the Imperial Produce Stakes at Kempton, when Teufel, downed him, but the performance was at the time described as a nuke, and subsequent running has served to verify that opinion.

A London writer says.-—We notice in th* j forfeit list for lOgs the name of a man »_• i at the present moment is in Brighton Work. j house. We wonder what the owner of tin j animal to whom tho amount is duo would , take for liis debt.—As matters stand, Uti I Francis Hope is compelled to allow his nan* jto remain in tho forfeit list. The Jocltej | Club know nothing of so much in tha j pound, and Lord Francis cannot pay ithe amount in full, or proceedinn j might be taken against him tor makfiu' the Jockey Club a preferred creditor.*---Surely it is a disgrace to the family thaithe late Lord Calthorpe's name should be allowed to appear iv the forfeit list. The amount is £385. His lordship was a man ef vast wealth, was a member of the Jockey Club, and on his death his executors realised a very considerable sum of money from the sale of his stud. He wa3 not a popularman and had few generous instincts, in fact, vn never know a man in his position whose loss, if it may bo termed a loss, was so little mourned. Still, wo do not like to soe hit | name dragged in the mud like tin's, and i those who have got his monov might, at any rato, pay his debts of honour.

A Sydney evening pa]ier states that foot months ago a working man at Reufere 1 dreamed that he saw a horse called Aunu-i. J win the Melbourne Cup, and that beforo the race was won he, the dreamer, died. He | had faith in his dream to such an extent ; that he backed it, at long odds, for £200. lAt this time he was quito in his usual health, but shortly after ho took ill and died. He gave the betting tickets to his wife. A number of neighbours who heard the story also mado bet 3 upon the race on tho strength of the dream, which had so far turned out true in so sadly remarkable a manner. Tho widow of "the man who dreamed the droam is now the richer by £200, and one neighbour is £50 in pocket. Referring to Mr Nat Gould's book " On and Off the Turf in Australia," " Terlinga" writes:—Mr Gould gives a brief outline of his Australian experiences, and montions any number of names. Throughout the book he lays the butter on very thick, Almost without exception the people he met out here wore "very fine fellows." Considering that he writes from memory, it it wonderful how free from error he is in referring to events. That story of Dan' O'Bti-n's timing a horse with an egg-boilw should (according to New Zealand authorities), however, bo credited to-Mrs O'Brien, and not her husband. I forgot whether the story has been told in The Australasianbefore, but here it is as given by Mr Gould t —" Watches are all very well, 'but I think not many trials have been timed with an egg-boiler, yet such was the case on one gallop. It appears that from a house over*" looking the raeccoitrso : Mr O'Brien saw a couple of horses about to break off for a ' go.' Not having his watch handy. he seized an egg boiler, and as the horses started set it going. He laid it flat as they passed the post. Then ho got his watch, turned up the egg boiler again, and timed the sand as it ran out. Result: he got the correct time almost to a tick." As I was told tho tale, Mrs O'Brien manipulated the egg-boiler from her house overlooking the Riccarton course, and the animal she "caught"-was the late Mr Robinson's Nonsense. Her husband hwl somothing good in tho 2*Tew Zealand Cup, and his wife thought he would thank her for a.record of Nonsense's trial. Mr O'Brien was out of the way at the time of the gallop. '.'

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18960106.2.12

Bibliographic details

ROUND THE WORLD., Press, Volume LIII, Issue 9306, 6 January 1896

Word Count
1,161

ROUND THE WORLD. Press, Volume LIII, Issue 9306, 6 January 1896

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