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ROUND THE WORLD.

In my day (says a Melbourne writer) I have had the pleasure of witnessing those splendid racing mares, Barbelle, Mermaid, Petrea, and Cerise and Blue scooping the Sydney Cup pool; also, the New Zealand bred mare, Lurline, and the great Sybil, who finished second to Briseis in the Melbourne

Cup, racing home in front of the fields in our Australian Cup ; but not one of these, in my humble opinion, could make Trenton's daughter stretch her neck from a mile up to two miles and a quarter.. At a recent, meeting of the English Jockey Club Lord Durham brought forward a motion to alter Rule 19 as follows :—" 19. The following officials shall be appointed for every meeting, subject to the approval of the stewards, viz., clerk of the course, handicapper {who shall not act as clerk of the course at the same meeting) stakeholder, clerk of tlie scales, starter, and judge, each of whom, as a qualification for his office, requires a licence to be granted annually by the stewards of the Jockey Club," and, in doing so, said that it was very undesirablo that offices should be doubled or trebled by the same person, but that especially it was undesirable that a handicapper should, as clerk of the course, be in any way connected with the financial success of a meeting, or interested in securing entries for it, as it might possibly bias his judgment. Lord Eliesmere said the stewards quite approved Lord Durham's motion. Lord Suffolk seconded the motion* Mr Leopold de Rothschild said he hoped it would not follow that all handicaps must be made by one or two handicappers, as that was quite against the interests of sport. Lord Rendlesham said that though it was not desirable at the larger meetings that offices should be doubled, at the smaller ones to have separate men for every office would mean a considerable increase of expense. After some further conversation, in which Lord Londonderry, Mr Paget and Mr Lowther took part, the motion was put to the meeting and carried unanimously. Best Man after running second in the Cambridgeshire, a few days later won the Old Cambridgeshire Handicap, in which he carried 9st. The race was his last appearance on the turf and he is to take up stud life, standing at a fee of 100g3. Best man is returned as being by Ormonde or Melton, but there is no doubt he is a son of the latter who has a representative at the stud in New Zealand. A full brother to Ormonde, named Orelio, has been put into training for the Duke of W&.tminister. On the last day of the NewmarketHoughton Meeting, the Prince of Wales' Florizel EL, starting at odds on, easily defeated his solitary opponent in the JockeyClub Cup. All .opp received a present of £500 for winning the Cambridgeshire on Marco. The crack English two-year-old St. Frnsquin is parrot mouthed. Marco followed up hi 3 Cambridgeshire success by winning a free handicap on the

J third day of the Newmarket-Houghton j Meeting. j For the Free Handie_n for two-year-obis iat the Newmarket-Houghton Meeting, St. j Frusmiin was allotted 9st 71b, giving 71b ro j Omlailina, and lllb to Persimmon. j There were three subscriptions vacant for ] (. alopiu in October, his covering fac being 250 guinea, each. j Fo_tm_rao-k, who won the Liverpool j wore winning. The burst up, I behove, was over Sylvan Prince's win in the Hurdle I Race at Maribymong, Brewer began to | think that there were too many in his good j things, aud he kept his own counsel over the ! horse's chau--.. Somebody assumed that j Sylvan Prince had no chance, but- Mr j o._etih._m had a commission to execute, ami Ihe won a good stake, while tha members of I the old combination lost over the race. This j brought matters to _ crisis, and the burst i up of the combination was the result. I One of the most satisfactory features of j the Middle Pari: Plate is (says the Svortmnn) j that the weights are arranged on a high scale, enabling tlie finest horsemen of the day to rids. Thus when T. Loatcs, first jockey to the Palace House stable, was claimed for Knight of the Thistle, Mr Leopold de Rothschild was able to fall back upon F. Prate for St. Frusquin, to which fact was due in no small measure the colt's success. Pratt rodeabeautifnl rana, St. Frusquin being the first of the three placed horses to ahow ' signs of tirincr. yet with such magnificent ! coin-acre did he struggle on, assisted by all I the skill of a master of the art of jockey.ship, j that he gradually got Omladina into ditlij culiies, and staying on best won a grandly ! contested race by half a length. Pratt is a f nephew of Fred Archer's, and was taught by j him to ride when a very little boy. Though I only ten years old when his mentor died, he j retains many of the famous jockey's mannevi isms and characteristics, and to those early j lessons may probahly" be traced much of the | finish, science, and'excellence so noticeable • in this vear"..H_ncounter.

i The race for The Whip on the last day of | the Newmarket Second October Meeting, I ami which is rim over the Beacon Coarse— ; four miles one furlong and 177 yards—had I Lorikeet and Glengall in opposition', tlie j latter of whom (the favourite) broke down, ! and finished half-a-dozen lengths in the I i _ai. Tlie time occupied by the pair was ■ close upon a quarter of an hour. ; Why does anyone think of lions when I describing gameness in horses, writes the i "Special Correspondent" of the London ! Sportsman. I do not know much about lions, • but am assured by those who do that they j are by no means distinguished for- courage, i still less for ability to race up hills or elsei where. Now, greyhound breeders have ere j now been known to introduce a bull cross Ito give gamenes.. and stamina'; hence the | bull-dog simile is not inappropriate. j All the tall talk which lately took place as sto what the London start ing-prico book- ! makers were going to do : all the regulations I they were about to make ; and the nsw j restrictions which they intended to impose ! upon all business which they nndortooic- in I future, has ended (says a London exchange Jof October 19th), a3 every one acquainted J with the matter expected that it would, in a ! complete fizzle. For this result there were i several reasons. To begin with, the statej nients circulated as to the enormous losses I bookmakers were sustaining were not true. j They have no doubt been losing, and losing ' considerably, as'they will always do in such j a fine and equable season as the one we have j just gone through, in which climatic aids to i the upsetting of public form are conspicuous Iby their absence. But they have not been losing—and in fact the bookmakers never do lose—to anything like the extent which backers lose when the weather is bad, and when in consequence no reliance can be : placed on the way in which horses have been running or will ran. i St. Frusquin, Omladina, Persimmon, I Knight of the Thistle, Mr Leopold de I Rothschild, the Duke of Westminster, I H.R.IT. The Prince of Wales, and Mr Harry M'Calmont, M.P. The above formed the '. first four in the Middle Park Plate to-day '(says' th<? Sinrtihy 'I'imw of Ootoo.r 12.ii). , Where do we poor men coma in? Tlie I victory of St. Frusquin' settles the two-year- ! old supremacy; and he will be the winter favourite for the Derby. , Tho bet of six i monkeys that was offered against Per- \ simmon, after 5 to 1 had been taken, pre- • pared us for a performance that would I -scarcely rival thatc'of Goodwood, bub inasi much as-only'y?we-k or'eo ago Persimmon ; was coughing, it cannot be said that in running third he disgraced himself, especially las Omladina, who was second, had won an ! extraordinary trial. i Simonian's fee is to be 50 guineas. This, ; says a London paper, is reasonable enough for one of the very best looking sons of St. : Simon, who was in his day a good performer. Ravensbury will stand at 100 guineas. \ The Derby cropped up at the principal 1 club yesterday (says Man of the World of ; October 16th), and St Frusquin was made ! favourite at 3 to 1, as Persimmon had been [previously, the absurd wager of 100 to 80 ! for a place being laid on the colt.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18951220.2.5.2

Bibliographic details

Press, Press, Volume LII, Issue 9294, 20 December 1895

Word Count
1,444

ROUND THE WORLD. Press, Volume LII, Issue 9294, 20 December 1895

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