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ENGLISH SPORTS AND PASTIMES.

Losdox, October 25. THE TETtF. In my last letter I had not time, on account of the mail leaving, to allude to the Middle Park Plate, run on the last day of

the second October meeting at Newmarket. The Prince of Wales , colt. Persimmon. wa3 favourite, Omladina and St. Frusquin being well backed. St. Frusquin vron a good race by half a length from Omladina, with the favourite third. The Prince's colt was not in his best form, and he had evidently lwan coughing. St. Frusquin is by St. Simon-—lsabel, and owned by Mr L. de Rothschild. He is a smart colt, and although beaten at Kempton Park the week bsfure he was then giving away a lot of -weight. The Dake of Westminster's Omladina is a smart lilh*. The winter betting over the Derby promises to be snore open than usual, but the probabilities are St. Frnsquin will be favourite nntil Spring trials bring other candidates into the field. There can bs no doubt about St. Frusquin being a good colt, and I hope he will winter well. He is a thorough sticker aud wins his races by sheer hard finishing. A three days' meeting at Sandown Park was laost enjoyable, although the weather is now uncertain, and the mornings are cold. The Great Sapling Plate, of I,O<X) sovsj, was won by Omladina, who naturally started favourite after her running intlurMiddle Park Plate. In the hands of M. Cannon she won easily from Mcli Mclo and Gulistan. By the way M. Cannon Ims renewed his engagement si 3 first jockey forKingsclere stable. In the Sandown Foal Stakes of 2000sovs, Col. North whose luck has been very bad won with Red Heart who had only two moderates in Church Parade and Queen of the Chaso to beat. Fancy a field of three horses for a 2000sovs prize, 'the same amount as the Caulfield Cup in which we often see thirty or more runners. Red Heart is a handsome horse-but the way he cut it in the Duke of York Stakes at Kempton induced the fielders to lay even money against him and 11 to 10 against Church Parade, 33 to 10 on offer against Queen of the Chase .without finding takers. Mr H. M'Calmont won the Orleans Nursery Handicap with Amphora. The Sandown Autumn Handicap of sQosovs went to Baron de Rothschild's Medicis, by Robert the DeviL—Skotzka. Medicis has the reputation of being thoroughly unreliable, but on this occasion he was on his best behaviour and beat Irish Car and Mowbray comfortably. Irish Car is an unlucky horse constantly running into places, but failing to win. The Hersham Two-Year-Old Race of 500sovs went to Major Lambton's Diameter, by Testator—Diana, also was afterwards sold to Mr J. A. Miller for 420 guineas. Last Saturday, the concluding day of the meeting was devoted to Hurdle racing, and some big field's were out, but I saw no horses capable of beating such animals as Rcdleap, Tim Swiveller, Norton, Ebor, and others. Mr. J. Alison, the handicapper, put in some good work, and the finishes were close. Newmarket Honghton. meeting commenced on Tuesday in miserable weather, but there was a wonderful change for the better on Wednesday when thi Cambridgeshire was run. On Tuesday Lord Marcus Beresford made a good start by securing the Trial Plate, with old Houndsditch, by Peter, a horse he bought a week or two back, at Mr James Lowther's sale. He was bought in for 210 guineas, so Lord Marcus made another good deal. In the Isleham Plate, Sir J. Blundell-Maple had a win with Gangway, by Saraband—Gang Warily. Odds of 5 to 2 were laid on Dumbarton, but Gangway won easily. A curious incident happened in the Criterion Stakes. This race is run on the Cambridgeshire Hill and consequently members of the ring and the public have to walk some distance to the stands after the previous race. The starting poet for the Criterion Stakes is about a couple of hundred yards from the saddling sheds. Mr A. Coventry dropped the flag before the people had time to move from ono stand to the other. No one knew the flag had fallen until Aureus and Conroy, the only two runners, were seearacing a quarter of a mile from home. There was no time for betting, but one backer without looking at the race laid three ponies to one on Conroy and Aureus won. It was just as well for backers they had no time to bet as Conroy would have been a hot favourite. The Cambridgeshire day drew a large crowd of psople to the famous heath. It was a splendid day for racing, no sun, bat the atmosphere clear and a fine view of the race could be obtained. I was much interested to see how Paris would shape a3 the night bsfore it had been decided to run him , and Otto Madden was to ride. Paris had been interrupted in his preparation, bjavjhg caught a cold and his absence from exercise for nearly a week could not have improved his chance. I heard, however, the night before the race he was expected to run well. It was therefore very disappointing next morning to find he had been scratched owing to the death of the Marquis of Waterford, the eldest brother of Lord William and Lord Marcus Beresford. The Marquis of Waterford was fifty-one years of age and in his younger days he was a tearaway. He was a gay youth in the Ist Life Guards, when he bolted with Mrs Vivian, the second daughter of Major Rowley. He married her after her divorce, but she only lived a year. The year after her death the Marquis married Lady Blanche Somerset, only daughter of the Duke of Beaufort. The Marquis of Waterford met with an accident in the hunting field ten years ago, when in Leicestershire. He' injured his spine and had to be wheeled about in a chair. His sufferings were terrible and this, no doubt, caused him to shoot himself at Curraghmore on Tuesday morning. Despite his faults and failings the Marquis was a popular man, and although he had the wild blood of the Beresfords in him he became much quieter before he met with his accident. I thought this brief account of a once well-known man in sporting circles would be of interest. His death, as I said before, was the cause of Paris being struck out of the Cambridgeshire. The son of Grandmaster has, however, been entered at Liverpool and Manchester, so he may start before the winter sets in. There was a lot of betting before the race. The Austrian horse, Tokio 11, was backed for a heap of money. Count Schomberg and Tokio started favourites with None the Wiser. Best Man, Portmarnock, and Marco best backed of the others. Tokio 11. ran badly and he was beaten before half the distance had been run. It was a strongly run race, for a wonder. None the Wiser disappointed mc very much. She was one of the first of the heavily backed lot to crack up. She is a magnificent mare to look at. I cannot make her out. I will not believe this is her true form. At the famous Bushes, Bloodthiratv, a fancied outsider, Marco, Amphidamas, Hebron, and Count Schomberg seemed have the race to themselves. The first pair to go out were Bloodthirsty,, and Amphidamas. What Wall, the rider of Count Schomberg. was about I do not know, but he finished without the least judgment and let Best Man beat him for second place, but Marco sailed away; in front and won an easy victory by three lengths, only a head separating Best Man and Count Schoml>erg, and the Count most certainly ought to have been second. Marco was heavily backed and the public M'on over him. He is by Barcaldine—Novitiate and owned by Mr F. Luscombe. F. Allsopp rode him and he is trained by Tom Chaloner. The mile and a distance was run in lmin 57sec, nothing very smart as regards time. Count Schomberg ran second in the Duke of York Stakes, third in the Cesarewitch, and third in the Cambridgeshire. Hebron finished in fourth place which does not make the form very good. The other races were only of minor importance. The Prince of Wales and the Duke of Cambridge were both present, and there was a large attendance of foreigners to see Tokio 11. and Le Justicier run. It is stated that the defeat of Tokio 11. caused considerable consternation in Vienna, where it was felt almost certain the horse would win. Just a line about the Dewhurst Plate run for on Thursday. St. Frusqnin, who started at odds of 7 to 4 on beat Knight of the Thistle and Helm, and thus added further to his laurels. F. Pratt again had the mount. Mr L. de Rothschild's filly by Morglay, won the Feather Plate and was sold to Sir J. Blundel-Maple for 600gs. Marco the winner of the Cambridgeshire, had no difficulty in beating his solitary opponent Villiers, in the Free Handicap Sweepstakes, and odds of 7 to 1 were freely laid on him. Mr " Jersey" won the Maiden Plate with Bride of the Sea, while Mr T. B. Miller's Ariette, a red-hot favourite, got home in the Houghton Handicap. Satanita won the Two-year-old Selling Plate, starting at 3 to 1 and ridden by M. Cannon, beat Sarchedon and Little Bob, the last named being favourite with T. Loates in the saddle. The last race <Jt the day, the Bretby Nursery Handicap, went to the colt by Oberon-Polly Marden, ridden by Knowlei and carry in i> bottom weight. The day's racing was not particularly interesting. The meeting concludes to-day (Friday).

Mr Edmund Tattersall, head of the wellknown firm of auctioneers, caught a chill at Newmarket, and is now at the Rutland

Arm 3 Hotel very ill. I hopa, the gallant old sportsman, will pull through. I ought to have mentioned that at Sandown Park Gray's starting machine was exhibited in; the paddock, and attracted a lot of attention. It was stated the exhibited had been used to start 1600 nUJjes in the Colonies. It was carious to watcfi/the faces of the men looking at the invention. A snpeVcilious smile hovered over Uicir features, and they evidently did not tiselieve in the simple locking barrier replacing Mr Arthur Coventry with tbo fief. When the maeJiiue is successfully tried here, I feel snre some of the. leading proprietary clubs will adopt it. Seventeen thoroughbreds, the property of M. Pierre Lorillard, hive been landed from New York by the steamer Bovic, and it is cvideut M. Lorillard is about to desert the American turf. When he raced iv England fourteen or fifteen years ago, I recollect seeing his horse Iroquois win the Derby and St. Leger. I hope success will attend his colours again. On Monday afternoon, Bam Emmett, of Waudsworth, seulieft H. Cornwall, of Clayton, in best and belt boats from Putney to Mortlake for £50 a side. Emmett was a good favourite at'odds of 2 to 1 on and he won by six lengths in 22min 47sec. Mr W. J. Innes acted as umpire. '. • THE KING. You have probably heard all about the Creedon—Craigficht which took place at the National Sporting "Club and insulted in favour of the I*sw Zealander. Creedon fought well, mor§j|Bsgecially considering his left hand was and he could not use it to any advaniage in the fifth round. Creedon will rest fintil after Christmas when he will proljably be matched against Joe Choynski, if h<; can get clown to list 6lb. Ted Pritchard is also anxious to have a go at Dan Creedon. Tom Tracey, Creedon's half brother, will be matched against a good lOst man, when Mr Fleming has hunted one out. CYCLING. The London Vestries and County Councils are in favour of taxing cyclists. The various clubs seem to be divided in opinion on the matter. Mr Henry N. Castance, the lion, secretary and treasurer of the Amateur B. C., is in favour of it. Ke says that taxation will not make the slightest difference to his club, and that many members would welcome such a tax if it would be the means of keeping rowdy cyclists off the road. I think myself cyclists *will be taxed before long, but I should not care to bathe minister introducing such a tax. He would catch it hot at the next election.

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ENGLISH SPORTS AND PASTIMES., Press, Volume LII, Issue 9291, 17 December 1895

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ENGLISH SPORTS AND PASTIMES. Press, Volume LII, Issue 9291, 17 December 1895

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