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CRICKET.

CANTERBURY v NEW SOUTH WALES

The advent of a team of cricketers from Sydney, stamped as it ia with the hallmark of authority from that influential body the New South Wales Cricket A°_~_iation, marks an epoch in our cricket history, the importance of which can hardly be overestimated. True we have had team* from the Bister colony before; but a tour organised by private enterprise c-»n never create the same amount of interest as oue origin ] ated by a recognised ruling body. The j cricke f public is a sceptical quautity, and I however good and bona-Jide a travelling j te*m may be, it does uot command the same j ri spec;, as a team selected an-i scut away by J the governing body of its own centre". ! There cannot be a d*jubt tint visits from teams such as the present one muit- do a deal of good to our cricket in New Zealand. As the Vice-President of the Cricket Council remarked at the recepiiou the •"•ther «lay, in all the principal towns in N>*.w Zealand there is an abund-tnee of raw material iv the shape of young cricketers, who only require the training necessary to make go-id players. There is not ihe least I doubt this "rawmiit-rial" will be "worked | up," and pro fir. considerably by the lesson 9 that may be learned from the Welshmen. Oar visiters come from a laud where they I have ha I as patterns such giants of tbe ' cricket world as Gifftfn, Murdoch, McDowell, Black nam, Turner, aud a host of others, aud players from such a school, pourtraying as they must do to some extent the skill of their masters, will excite the admiration of lovers of the game, and .be an object lesson to our players. The great national game is ouly in its inLiucy here compared with Australia, aud it will be no disgrace to any t*".ain to have ,its colours lowered by the strong combination of players from the other side of the water. The New Zealand Cricket Council has done good work at this early stage of its career in arranging the present tour, and it will doubtless do further good work in the near future by returning the compliment of ths New South Wales Cricket Association and tending a duly accredited New Zealand team to Australia. With so much accomplished it c*u only be a matter of time when regular home and home matches will be arranged with the different Australian colonies. Ji\ congratulating tho New Zealand Cricket Council ou the" successful result of its eSf-ircs, a word of praise is due to Mr C. R. Smith, the Hon. Secretary of the Council, who has been the chief factor in negotiating for the tour and has been indefatigable in his exertions to bring it to a successful issue.

There has been considerable speculation as to the positiou occupied iv New South Wales cricket by the members of the present team and as to their standard of play compared with the flower of Australian cricket. It 13 not claimed thab they are the best team New South Wales could put in Che field, but as showing how nearly they approach it, the status of some of the players may be mentioned. Calloway, who was unfortunately unable to play in the present match, had the distinction of being chosen iv last season's Australian Eleven to play ag u'nst the Englishmen in oue of the test matches, and he came oue with a batting average of 26. and headed the bowling averages with 11.2. S. R. Watford has had the honour of playing for his cdony against Queensland, and only this seasou made the large score of 307 in a first eleven, match. Burton, the wickotkeeper of the team, played for his colony iv intercolonial contests for five yearp. Poidevin, Wade, Pryor aud other have also wonderfully good records in fi-sr, class cricket, aud it will therefore be seen that the team as a whole is a very strong one, and a fair sample of N.S.W. cricket.

Saturday's play, though unquestionably slow to the cisual'onlooker, presents many points of interest to devotees of the game, and doubtless our players will not have failed to profit by what they saw. The fielding of the visitbrß was quite an exhibition of almost faultless picking up and returning. Of course there were one or two exceptions, but taken all round better work in the field has hardly ever been seen at Lancaster Park. Another striking feature waa the wonderfu'.l&accurate direction of their </s■& the exception of Noouan none of theßowlers appeared to be very deadly, but with all their fieldsmen but one o-.i tho off side, the precision with which they all kept the bowlmg off the leg side made it an exc.ediugly difficult matter to get runs. Moreover, the bowlers are all fast, aud aa the Canterbury batsmen have been educated in a school where slow and medium trundling largely preponderates, many of our usually reliable run-getters— although pretty successful in defence—were quite nonplussed when it came to getting runs, and several lost the number of their mess in trying to force the pace. With only half an hour to bat, there was but little opportunity to form an opinion on the visitors' prowess as batsmen. Pearce's fiery deliveries, though negotiated safely, wore not relished, and young Reese's slow and curly cues fairly stuck them up at times. Drawing a line from this it is logical to conclude thac our slow break bowlers, though they may prove expensive, will stand the best cnance of dislodging their adversaries.

In dealing with the play, the least that cau be said is, that the Canterbury total was a disappointing effort. Making due allowance for good bowling and splendid fielding, we yet think our eleven is worth more thati a total of 124. Though not wishing to make excuses, the opinion may be ventured that several of Cauterbury's best batsmen were got cheaply, and it will be surprising if they do not largely exceed their first innings total in their second attempt. Amoog Canterbury's batsmen Wilding once more occupied pride of place. .His success was most popular, for; although his batting was not such a stylish and faultless performance as he has been known to give, he played the game the onlookers so dearly like to see, aud, by eschewing orthodoxy, put the runs on quickly at a time when they were badly wauled. When it was remembered, too, that it was only one of many top scores that he has made for Canterbury, it is not surprising that the veteran received a warm welcome on returning to the pavilion. Lawrence, perhaps gave -the most correct and stylish exhibition of batting. His defence waa first class, and his-play on the off side was clean and pretty to a degree. Certainly he let off a number of ballß outside the off stump, but he also made a number of splendid strokes on that side which added nothing to the score owing to the strong phalanx of fieldsmen there. The ball that caused his downfall—a very short one, well outside the off pin—was probably the worst one he had had to play, and there was geueral regret that such a promising innings was cut short. Archie Ridley was unusually patient at first and showed good defence, but the fast bowling did not suit him, and although afterr.be started to hit he got 14 quickly, he fell a victim to his own haste. Labatt commenced very well, and combining sturdy defence with good hittiug soon got into double figures. However, bis apparent anxiety to get the ball to the onside, where there was a dearth of fieldsmen, caused his departure, for he was caught by the solitary occupant of that side of the field. C. Ridley was the only other batsman to get into double figures, and he played a lot of good bowling cautiously and well. Cuff's early downfall caused general disappointment, for after his consistent scoring in Cup matches this season great things were expected of him. He did not appear to relish the lbw decision given against him, although from an onlooker's point of view he appeared to slew right round in front of his wicket in his effort to glide the ball to leg. DeMaus was even more disappointing than his skipper, for after scoring a pair from a somewhat lucky stroke, he let out in a most unaccountable manner, and wa3 bowled. Pearce was unfortunate in being given out caught at the wicket —a decision that certainly appeared doubtful. However, with this exception the umpiring appeared entirely satisfactory throughout the afternoou. There was some curiosity as to how young Reese would shape in his initial effort, and it may at once be said that he batted with the coolness and correctness of a veteran. He met every ball with the lull face of a straight bat, aud as be kept the ball down well he appeared to be safe as long as Fowke stayed with him. However, an attempted sharp run ended his c_reer, much to the chagriu of the younger portion of the spectators. With ouly half-au-hour for the visitors to bat Pryor at once got to work, and 11 runs were scored in the first four overs. After this the bowling was too good to be taken liberties witn, aud eleven more overs only saw ths score at 18 with one good wicket j

down. What little fielding the Canterbury men had to do was done well, and if the same standard of bowling and fielding is maintained on Monday it is quite on the cards that New South Wales may not have a very big lead on the innings. The weather ou Saturday was not the best that could be desired, for it was dull overhead and a cool easterly wind blew across the ground. But for ibis the attendance would probably have beeu much larger. As it was there were appareutly not moro than 1500 present—a poor attendauee for a big match on a Saturday afcernoou. Nothing was lacking in the way of arrangements for the successful c-rryiug through of tbe match and the comfort and convenience of the spectators. Splendid wickets had been prepared, and as they had been covered during the latter part of the rainy weather they were fairly hard. An occasional ball got up, but these were mostly short-pitched ones. The outerouud was slow, and it took a very lusty stroke to get a hit along the carpet to the boundary—the edge of the grass. It is needless to say that after the heavy rains we have had the beautifully _reen sward was a perfect picture, and the visitors were loud iv their praise of our five ground. A great improvement was made in the arrangement of the scoring boards. The one usually posted near the pavilion was stationed oa the western terrace, along with the scorers' box, and as there was another board on the eastern side, the onlookers were enabled to see at a glance bow the score was going. The boards also showed, by figures corresponding with those agaiusb the players' names on the official scoring card, who was batting and bowling a*« the game progressed. Afternoon tea was provided in the pavilion, and a brisk business was done with that popular beverage. Messrs Jones and Callaway umpired for Canterbury and New South Wales respectively, and, as before mentioned, their decisions gave general satisfaction.

Shortly after two o'clock Cuff beat Cobcroft in the toss for choice of innings, and shortly afterward, the Welshmeu, looking spick and spau in their white and light blue, emerged from the pavilion amid the applause of the spectators. On Cuff and Lawrence following, the Australians gave three hearty oheers for the local men, aud business then commeuced. Noouan opened from the pavilion end to Cuff, who gob a single. Shea was entrusted with the ball at tue other end, and bowled a maiden. In his next over Cuff back cut him nicely for a triplet. Lawrence started his score with a lucky snick for 2, and a stylish leg glide for 3 brought the first acore on the board. Each bowler sent down a clipping over, but in Noouan s next Cuffs weakness of screwing round in front of his wickeb caused his downfall. 12—*1—6. C. Ridley took his captain's place, and broke . the ice with a single. Good bowling and splendid work in the tield kept play alow for a time, and singles were chiefly responsible for sending 20 up. Two runs later. Ridge supplanted Shea and commenced by bruising Lawrence's hand with a bumpy one. Shortly afterwards, Noonan made an unsuccessful appeal for Ibw against Ridley. Uneventful playwas broken by a clever stroke to leg for 3 by Lawr.nce—3o np. The same batsmau brought down rounds of applause by sweetly cutting a half volley to the boundary, and driving the next ball to the off fence for 4. A single, sent 40 up after an hour's play. Cobcroft gained applause by a fast bit of fielding, and with tha score at 4. Noonan displaced Ridley's off stump with a good one. 42—2—10. Canterbury's chief hope—ia the person of DeMaus—now appeared, and he safely negotiated the rest of a grand maiden over from Noonan. A pretty leg glide to Lawrence for 2, and flume took the ball from Ridge. The chauge was successful, for the last of three loose balls Lawrence cut sharply into Pryor's hands at cover. The Midlander was lourtly applauded on returning, and 44—3— 26 appeared as Labatt joined DeMaus. The latter opened his score and broke Noonan's string of maidens by getting a snick for 2, but in the last ball of the same over the Midland crack let out at a half volley and was bowled. Looks of dismay appeared on the Canterbury supporters' faces as 46—4— 2 appeared on the board. Collins filled the vacancy, and Labatt cemented the partnership by pulling flume for a pair. A couple to the same batsman brought 50 up. Tho little man cut Hume grandly for a triplet, and the next over, on Noonan experimenting with a couple of full tosses, tbe batsman brought himself into doable figures with another 3. In Hume's next Labatt failed to properly get bold of a halfvolley and was caught at mid-on. 56—5— 10. Pearce started with a single, aud Collins at last broke the ice, also with a single. At 59 Pearce was given out caught at the wicket. 59—6—1. Wilding was the incomer, and after scoring a single got a lucky 4 behind the wicket. The veteran delighted the onlookers by dragging Hume to the on for 3. Immediately afterwards, Collins was taken at the wickets and 67—7 —2 appeared on tbe board aa the result of two hours' play. A. Ridley joined his Club mate, who placed Noonan nicely to fine leg for a brace. A single brought 70 up. Two more pairs to the veteran kept play fairly interesting. Ridley at last opened his account with a couple. At 76 Wilding put an easy one into Walford's hand at mid-on, who dropped it, and the veteran showed his gratitude and brought down the house by slogging Hume to the on, for which 5 were run—Bo up, amid applause. He made things lively by driving Noonan for 2 and puttiug him to leg for 3 in quick succession. This caused Shea to take the ball from Noonan, and the new trundler was hit for half a dozen the first three balls, Wilding making himself top scorer. 90 went up, and Ridley should have been caught in the slips off Hume, but 2 resulted. The veteran covered himself with glory by bringing up the century with a grand drive over the bowler's head for 4. This was his last, for a big gallery hit to the on landed iv JTurness' hands. 102—8—3. Reese filled the gap and put his first ball to leg for 3. At 106 Cobcroft took the ball from Shea, and Ridley sent him grandly to leg for 4, bringing 110 up. At 112 the Lancastrian stepped out to Hume aud was clean bowled, and aa 112—9—14 appeared Fowke, the last man, went in. The incomer started with a pair and then drove Cobcroft for a like number. Slow play, and then Ridge took the ball from his skipper, the first one going for 4 byes. 120 ap. With only another single on a close run ended in the Midland youngster being run out.

At 5.30 the Canterbury men took the field, and were shortly followed by Cobcroft and Pryor. The former took strike to Pearce, who bowled from the pavilion end, and sent down a maiden. Reese took the ball at the other end, and Pryor drove his fifth ball sweetly to the off boundary, and sent the next to leg for a pair. Another 2 to the same batdmao, and 2 singles to the skipper sent 10 up. Pryor gave Reese a hot chance, which he just failed to bold, a single resulting. Good bowling steadied the play, and Reese after sticking up the Sydney skipper several times clean bowled him with a beauty. 13—1—2. Walford followed his captain, and opened with a couple to square leg off Reese. Slow play and Pryor cut Pearce for a brace. Nothing further happened, and with the score at 18 stumps were drawn. Play will be resumed at eleven o'clock today. The following are the scores :— CANTEBBURT. First Innings. L. A. Cuff, 1311. lbw, b Noonan ... 6 J. D. Lawrence, 2311112134412, c Pryor, b Hume 26 H. C. Ridley. 112111111, b Noonan ... 10 H. Dailaus, 2, b Noonan ... ... 2 A. M. Labatt, 2233, c Walford, b Hume ... ... ... ... 10 J. U. Collins, 11, c Burton, b Hume ... 2 W. Pearce, 1. c Burton, h Hume ... 1 F. Wilding, 143212252311141, c Furness, b Hume ... ... ... ... 33 A. E. Ridl*-. 213224, b Hume ... 14 D. Reese, 311111. run out ... ._ 8 J. N. Fowke. 2211, not ont ... ... 6 Uvea, 14 ... ... ... 5 Leg-bye, 1 ... ... ... 1 Total 124 BOWLING AyALYSIS Balls. Mdas. Rums. Wkts. J. Noonan ... 168 14 31 4 M. Shea ... 54 0 27 0 J. Hume ... 126 7 34 5 L. T. Cobcroft 18 0 10 0 F. Ridge ... 66 5 16 0 SEW SOUTH WALES. First Innings. L. T. Cobcroft, 11. b Reese... ... 2 D. Prvor. 4221112, not out ... ... 13 S. R. Walford, 21, not out ... ... 5 Total for one wicket «. 18

(PRESS ASSOCIATION* TELEGRAMS.) DUNEDIN, December 15. The following have been selected to renresent Otago in the match with the New South Wales cricketers :—Baker, Beddingtou, Clayton. Clarke, Downes, Fisher, Hope, Johnson, Rains, Ra'tray and Wells. WELLINGTON, December 15. In tbe Senior cricket matches Midlands defeated Phoj.ix by an innings and 98 runs. In Wellington v Rivals the former want 81 runs to win, with eit*ht wickets to fall.

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Bibliographic details

CRICKET., Press, Volume LII, Issue 9290, 16 December 1895

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3,162

CRICKET. Press, Volume LII, Issue 9290, 16 December 1895

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