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NOTES AND COMMENTS.

" Weekly Press and Referee

{By Hotspur.] j The Premier of England has gained the summit of a sportsman's ambition by carrying off the Derby with a colt of his own breeding. Lord Rosebery is so immensely popular with ail clasee3 of his countrymen that it was easy to predict that the victory of his colours at Epsom would be the occasion of much en tb miasm. That the demonstration was of an uuusual character is vouched for by the cable news in another column. The fact, of coarse, that Lidas had been a strong public favourite for the race all through the piece, would lend warmth to the ovation. Ladas, by his deeds, proclaims the fact that he is a colt of exceptional merit. He has so far not tasted defeat, and it may be said that be has never yet been fully extended in public. On his first appearance, which was in the Woodcote Siakes, he started at 10 to 1 against, but cantered away from Mecca and tne oads-on favourite, Glare. The Coventry Stakes at Ascot was his next venture, and in that he easiiy disposed of Bulliogdon and eight others, while the odds laid on him in the Champagne Stakes were landed without the slightest difficulty. The Middle Park Plate was his last race as a two-year-old, and his easy victory therein brought his total of winninjers to £5730 for the season. All through the winter he was consistently backed for the Derby, and though he receded in the quotations early in the year owing to bis being kept from exercise on account of an injury to his hock, he came into more pronounced favour when he resumed work with the rest of Matthew Dawson's team. Within the last few weeks Ladas has been credited with the Two Thousand Guineas and NewmarketStakea, so the D.rby makes his third success this season. Ladas' farther engagements include the Eclipse Stakes, run next month ; Prince of Wales Stakes, at Newmarket, and the St. Leger. The following are the winners of the Derby, the number of starters, jockeys and times since St. Gaticn aud Harvester ran a dead heat for the prize in 1884:— 1886 Lord Hasting-' Melton ... 12 Archer ... 2 441-5 1836 Dake of Wo.tmini'ter'a Ormonde.. 9 Archer... 2 453-5 1837 Mr Abirigton'c Merry Hamnton ... 11 Watta ... 243 ISBS l)uk* of Portland'- Ayrshire ... 9 P.BftTre t2 43 ISS9 Duke of Por:land's Donovan ... 13 T. Lcates 2 44 2 5 18S0 S",r J. e3 —iller'a S-ii-ifoi . ... ... 8 "Watts ... 249 4-5 1891 Sir P. Johnstone's . omoion ... ... 11 G.Baxrett 2 56 4-5 18S2 1.0-rc" Bradfor 'a BirHu o 13 Allsopp... 244 1693 Mr «. &TC_lmont a Isinrlßfs ... ... 11 T. lioates 2 43 1994 Lord 80-ebery's Ladas ... ... ... 7 W-tts ... 243 The number of starters last week was the smallest since ISO 3, when Ditto won in a field of six. How generally anticipated was the success of the Premier's colt i 3 gathered from the state of the betting—he being the warmest favourite that has started for many years past. Ormonde's price in 1886 was 85 to 40 on, and Isinglass' last year 9 to 4 on. Surefoot, who Ignomiuiously failed in Sainfoin's year, and who was quoted at 95 to 40 on, shares with those mentioned as the strongest public fancies during the last couple of decades. Ladas is described as a wiry, very bloodlike looking colt of fair size. His pedigree reads: —

Now that Ladas has won the Derby the irate feeling of backers over their losses in connection with Cloister and the Grand National will in a measure pass away. It is hardly probably Cloister would carry nearly as much money for his event as would the Premier's colt for the Derby, at the same time the withdrawal of the horse that had a year before at Aintree borne 12_t Tib to victory, and whose second success seemed merely a question of his keeping on his legs, caused an immense sensation. Even after the decision of the race the topic of the hour in sporting circles was Cloister and the Grand National. The explanation of an eminent veterinary surgeon was that the horse had strained the muscles of his back curing a long g.llop on the Saturday prior to his b.iuc scratched—that on account of the injury it would have b?en impossible for him to have run, and that absolute rest was requisite. That the authority was right in his conclusions every one implicitly believed, but the age of the injury was questioned, as before " the long gallop on the Saturday " Cloister was being peppered by theringmea, and odds offered against his chance which although shore were very long if Cloister were himself. Thus it was that the British public were more inclined to lend ear to the suggestion of a leading bookmaker, " that Cloister had trodden on a little bit of pencil," than to the diagnosis of Professor Pritchard. It ■was, however, made abundantly clear that Mr Grant, the owner of Cloister, was quite iv the dark as to the condition of his horse until apprised of the fact that he would be unable to start, and the trainer, if he suspected his charge was not all right, at least had little idea the horse wa9 so badly incapacitated as he was. It would, however, hardly do for backers always to have tbe best of it, and if the layers had a good time over the Steeplechase their winniugs will be dissipated by the success of the Derby favourite. It would appear that good horses retain high value in England, seeing that the owner of La Fleche haa given £15,000 for the runner-up for the Derby. The question naturally presents itself: If Matchbox be worth the price paid, whac sum woul__ Lada3 fetch ? Nothing, doubtless, would induce Lord Rosebery to part with his champion, yet were he submitted to competition at the present time it is most likely he would bring the record figure. With Ladas barring the way in the rich stakes. Baron de Hirsch would seem to have given an extravagant price for Matchbox; however, the purchase money js a small matter to either of the opulent noblemen who were parties to the deal. It ia certainly unfortunate that the compilation of the adjustments for the chief events at the Hawke's Bay J.C.s forthcoming meeting was made before the results of the running at the North New Zealand Grand National gathering had been disclosed, the more especially as only one horse that competed there, the winner of the Great Northern Steeplechase, could have been liable to carry a penalty. It so happens that that horse is not engaged a, the Hawke's Bay meeting. As it Is. in the light of Melinite's success at EUeralie, the Hurdle Race at Hasting* reads to be at her mercy, and I'm very much afrail there will be few bold enoogh to saddle up in deposition to Mr Robertson- nitre should ha eUc; th. Hurdle Rao* ft* *>«

mission. It must, however, be borne ? in mind that Melinite claims an engagement In the Steeplechase, and, as the meeting i* a single day one. ic would be manifestly out of the question for her to take par. in both contests. The Hastings country is not very formidable. and it may be that the owner of Melinite will make a bid for the valuable prize of the meeting, -eaing she has escaped with an impose she is hardly likely to scet iv with again. And yet the chances are that Melinite will not b© asked to underßO the risk of negotiating country, when sbe has so much the best of it in the Hurdles ; but at the same time there is just the possibility of her being aeufc for the Steeplechase, in which case the other event would present a very much more open affair. Kulnine, I am _.iti*fied, could carry his 12*t \ Gib into a prominent place. He is surely a stone better horse over hurdles thau j Tiritea, And I also think that Kapua aud ! Victrix are rather too close to the top weight. {Victrix has been scratched. — Ed.] Somnambulist gave promise a coupleof seasonsback of making a name for himself, but went all to pieces, and it is questionable if he will stand a proper preparation. Until he has given tangible proof that he will stand, I would be inclined to pass him by, albeit he is one of Ihe moat leniently treated of the lot, another that reads well being Oaklands, whose recent deeds cannot be ignored. While, however, Melinitk remains in the race she must necessarily dominate the betting market, and meantime there is no need, I fancy, to look further for the winner, and it would surprise mc to see Kulnine. at all events, offer her battle. There is a big drop from Norton's impost in the Steeplechase to that of the next in order, but Mr Rutherford's horse ia the acknowledged champion among our 'chasers, and should he be sent to take part in the contest there will be no more favoured candidate than he. If Norton's weight be now 31b more than when last year he failed in the mud to concede 29ir_ to Gondolier, he may be expected to be in better trim than then. To my mind he holds the bulk of those engaged safe. Whalebone is in the hospital, and though | Tiritea is not the duffer he appeared to be when he last essayed h country in public, I have no fancy for his chance this month, having an idea that he wants some race schooling. Timothy is given more thaD, his share of weight considering his achievements, and Booties and Victrix seem to have all the best of it with him, while Kapua must have a show if he jumps country a3 well as the smaller fences. Somnambulist is nicely weighted at lOst 61b but, as before remarked, he has been in retirement for a long time, and hi. getting to the post at anything like his best is, at least, very problematical. The acceptances which fall due on Monday, will, in all likelihood, indicate the intenj tions in regard to Melinite. I am inclined to think she will ba sent for the smaller priz. to be secured over the lesser jump*. Below Meiiuitethe pair Hike best are o.t_lands and Lonely, aDd such a reliable hurdler as the former of the.c is has been taken a liberty with in being so lightly esteemed. Leaving Melinite out of calculations Norton and Oaklands read to mc as well a 9 anything. Cable notice has been received that Norton has been awarded 12-»t 121b in the V.R.C. Grand National Steeplechase, his apportionment in tiie Hurdle Race being 12..41b, while Kulnine has 12it 7!b. Th° last time Captain Web', was handicapped for a hurdle race at Fierainglon he received 12_b 51b, and in all likelihood Mr Goll-ui's horse would again be awarded something like the same impost. Tim Srvivelier, last year's winner, (and perhaps one or two others), would doubtless head Kulnine in the handicap. The V.R.C. handicapper generally starts his steeplechase adjustments on a high scale and, although our crack has a formidable burden placed opposite his name, there will probably be one or two with even more to put up. Until, however, the full handicap has been received, it is idle to discuss the chances of the New Zealandera. If Mr Douglas' pair of steeplechasers m;ide a rather inauspicious debut on Australian soil, they would appear to have created a favourable impression by their fencing capabilities. Of all steeplechase cour.es in the colonies that at Randwick seems to be the most treacherous. Io is a most unusual circumstance for all the contestants ia a big jumping event there to complete the course without mishap, and a horse performing ever the Randwick country for the first time almost invariably comes to grief. The fate of the usually safe Waterbury and the daring little Mutiny need not therefore be wondered at. At the same time the class of 'chasers in the mother colony is at present so very poor that I rather fancied one of the Hawke's Bay sportsman's nominations would have proved triumphant on Saturday last. Our National winner, it may be presumed, was carrying nearly, if not quite, the top weight. Of other events at the A..7.C. Winter Meeting Couranto was engaged in the Hurdle Race, about which there is no word, while quite a host of New Zealandera were entered for the Winter Stakes and June Stakes, the latter a six-furlong dash. The well-performed Pilot Boy, it will be seen, carried off the Winter Stakes. Though apparently Mr Douglas did nob score at Randwick, I fully expect the trio he has now "battling" for him in Australia to more than pay their way. It will be bad luck indeed if Couranto does not net something for the stable, for the son of Patriarch, quite himself, can have but fewsuperiors and not many equals across the water. I had suspicion that Couranto had felt the.effects of his season's work, and was a bit dicky; concluding thus I questioned Mr Douglas sending a team to the continent. The invasion having been undertaken is a warrant, I should say, of the chief member of the team being quite sound. Waterbury and Mutiny can be relied on to do their share in upholding the prestige of. the stable, and I hope and have confidence that better results will accrue from Mr Douglas* pre-ent than from his last venture in Australia. Amiable, whose victory in the Ladies* race at Epsom was announced last week, was not over-successful in hex first season, seeing that she was only fir.t past the post on two occasions out of nine starts. She is, however', doing the under-study business for Ladas this season, for, after the colt won the Two Thousand, she annexed the One Thousand, and ha~ now responded to his Derby effort by carrying off the Oaks. Although running in tbe nomination of the Duke of Portland, Amiable is now the property of Lord Lurgan, who purchased her from the Dake at the Goodwood Meeting last July. Like Amiable, the two previous winners of the Oaks are by St. Simon, and tho3e that attached the stigma to that great sire's name, that his daughters were much inferior to his sons, will come to be ridiculed. A few weeks since it was written that it would be a unique record were Liberator to open and close his season's campaign by winning tbe two chief hurdle races in the colony's calendar. I apprehended he would fail to score in the chief hurdle race at Auckland for reasons which I considered good and sufficient. But if he did not manage his big contract, he did the next best thing in capturing the secondary Hurdle Race, and for this I was quite prepared. Once more am I tempted to exclaim good old Liberator! Having finished a rare season's service qn the flat he seems quite prepared to keep on at the u-hirer sport. Reminder, who by cable advices it will have i been seen after finishing third in the Derby, won the Epsom Grand Prize, opened the ' present sea.on well by winning tha Column

Produce Stakes on the second day of fhe Newmarket Craven Meeting.it being his victory therein that caused him to have a quotation for the great clns.ic event. T. Cannon, tho owner of Reminder, was present at Nowmarket for the first time for three yeara on the occasion of tbe coil's victory. He likewise had the satisfaction of seeing his son, Mornington, ride a couple of winners besides the home colt.

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Bibliographic details

NOTES AND COMMENTS., Press, Volume LI, Issue 8822, 18 June 1894

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2,722

NOTES AND COMMENTS. Press, Volume LI, Issue 8822, 18 June 1894

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