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THE LINCOLN SEAT.

The nomination took place at . the Courtenay Road Board office yesterday of the candidates for a seat in the House of Representatives for the district of Lincoln, rendered vacant by the retirement of Mr O'CaUaghan. There were about 30 electors present. Mr F. W. East was the Returning Officer. After an interval of silence Mr B—DPORd proposed, and Mr J. Turner seconded, the nomination of Mr John Ollivier.

Mr T. H. Anson proposed Mr Alfred Saunders, who, as a politician, was a good example to many members at present in the House. Had there been more such as Mr Saunders we should not now have been regretting our heavy burden of taxation. Mr Saunders had been termed an iconoclast. All that he (Mr Anson) knew that Mr Saunder's had tried to break was that heavy-headed image, the Public Debt. He had worked on the Education Board with Mr Saunders for about five years, and had always found him to be persevering and useful. He deserved support because he was opposed to further taxation and further borrowing, because he would endeavor to economise in the administration of the affairs of the colony. He was a local man, but one who would serve the interests of the colony first, and Lincoln afterwards.

Mr S. Ba—_iv seconded the nomination. As there were no other gentlemen nominated, the Returning Officer invited the candidates to address the meeting in the order in which they had been proposed. Mr Olltvier, whose speech throughout gave rise to a deal of merriment, remarked that if Mr Saunders had been wise he would have taken advice and retired from the contest, allowing % much younger man —(laughter)—like himself to bear the heat and burden of the day. It was a long time since he had been in Parliament— some 30 years. Since then there had been an attempt to teach something else than reading, writing and ciphering, He regretted this, and it was because of it that he wished to go to the House to put his shoulder to the wheel and upset it all. The contest between himself and Mr Saunders was iv no way a personal one, and neither had broken their mutual agreement to avoid personalities. (Applause.) When on Wednesday next they put him (Mr Ollivier) into that high and dignified position at the head of the poll, he would go to Wellington with the entire desire to discharge his duties in a spirit of independence befitting their representative. (Applause.) tie would cotton to nobody, and would be the most independent man in the House. He attacked the r lectoral A<-t as wanting amendment, at tbe least so far as nominations went. He would abolish. Boards of Education and School Committees, and appoint only a Commissioner. If returned, as he expected he would be, he should give his undivided attention to the subjects about which he had spoken, and they would find him a most faithful and honest representative. (Applause.) Mr SAUNDERS said tbat he had 'not heard a. more amusing speech at a nomination than that of Mr Ollivier. No contest had been more pleasing than the present one, and he had not been opposed by any gentleman who had contested an election with more lively wit and fun. He would like to have.heard Mr Ollivierrefer to other of those matters on which they differed iv opinion. In respect to Education Boards, he went on to assert that they were useful institutions. The serious question was to consider how best the money could be expended to promote the education of the rising generation in the country. We might curtail expenditure in other ways. We might spend less on dress and luxuries, aud no great barm would result But great harm would be felt if men curtailed the expenditure on education which would lessen the efficiency of the system, and our children would be unable to compete with the rest of the world. To abolish the Boards and School Committees would be a mistake, as great if not greater expense would be incurred by giving the County Councils charge of educational matters. The Boards and School Committees did the wor' without expense. If tbe charge of the schools were handed over to che County Councils there would be an additional expense as the secretaries would have to be some of the best educated men. While the expense on schools had been slightly increased, that of the Legislature had increased some 20 per cent., so that the Boards had worked cheaper than if the thing was wanted from Wellington. He then went on to support the whiskey distillation scheme. It were better to let our farmers get their ploughshares introduced free of cost, but he could not see what good could be gained by paying 10s a gallon for whiskey imported. If it were made locally there would be a revenue to the Government of about £250,000. He would not go into the questions of freetrade and pensions, in respect to which he held views at variance to those of Mr Ollivier. He was totally opposed to the system of pensioning. He then explained that he was responsible for the way in which the nominations were conducted. While advocating the ballot, he looked upon it as a necessary evil; necessary for those who were afraid to proclaim their opinions. His view was that there should; be an open announcement as to the gentleman the electors desired to see returned. He wanted to see perfect freedom in the matter. [Applause.l The Returning Officer called for a show of hands. Seven were held up for Mr Ollivier and eleven for Mr Saunders.

The former gentleman demanded a poll, which will be taken on Wednesday, January 17th, between the usual hours. A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer closed the proceedings.

A meeting of electors interested in placing Mr Saunders in the House was held at Annat on Monday. A good deal of business was eot through, and a strong Committee formed to study that gentleman's interest.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18890110.2.49

Bibliographic details

THE LINCOLN SEAT., Press, Volume XLVI, Issue 7251, 10 January 1889

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1,010

THE LINCOLN SEAT. Press, Volume XLVI, Issue 7251, 10 January 1889

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