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ASHLEY ELECTION.

DECLARATION OP POLL. The declaration of the poll for the recent election was made at the Magistrate's Court-house, West Oxford, at noon, on Monday, in the presence of about thirty electors.

_Mr Caleb Whit__foob_, Returning Officer, said the result of the polliuß on Wednesday, as announced in the morning papers of Thursday, upon a comparison of the rolls used by the deputy otflcers was not in any way altered, and the total numbers polled were, for — John Miles Verrall 23. Alfred Saunders 232 Marmaduke Dixon 225 There was thus a majority in Mr Verrall's favor of two Votes. The returns were published at 8 pan. on the day of polling, and considering- the distance of the polling places of North Loburn and Loburn, as well as some of the other booths, from a telegraph office, the promptness of the deputy officers deserved recognition from him at any rate. (Applause).. So far as he could ascertain, the informal. papers (seven) showed that they were not such as might have affected the result, for in each instance either all the names on them had been erased or all left uncancelled ; thus there was nothing in them to I cause any uncertainty or the idea that any of them could have been included as votes, and so affect the election.

Rev. E. A. Wyatt said he ventured to j ask the permi—ion of the Returninc; Officer I to express a few words of thanks on behalf of the successful candidate, Mr Verrall, who had gone to Wellington. He knew that the session would not last much c longer, also that there were some important measures for consideration, and that during the time at which tbe Ashley seat was vacant the district was disfranchised. Mr Verrall had placed a notice in one of the papers expressing how keenly sensible he was of the honor which had been placed upon him, and in a letter to him (the speaker), Mr Verrall said his greatest bope was that he would justify the confiderice placed in him. He also!—id therein that when he went to Wellington the affairs of the colony, as well as of the district, would occupy his full attention, and that it was his intention to subordinate certain matters upon which he held strong opinions. Lastly, Mr Verrall had charged him to say that, now the contest was over, he intended to recognise no distinction between supporters and opponents, but he looked on them all as persons to whom he was bound to Rive his best services. (Applause.) Mr Sacjcders said that no one would expect to hear a good speech from a defeated candidate, but as he stood before them to-day he did not feel at all like a defeated candidate, and certainly not like an ill-used man. He might say that he was getting quite in love with defeats, as each of his unsuccessful contests had shown him how rich he was in intelligent, disinterested, and long-attached friends. One especially gratifying feature in this election was the extremely pleasant relations which had existed throughout between himself and Mr Dixon, of whose kindness and courtesy throughout their five days' candidature he could not speak too highly—whose behavior to him had been more like that of a filial son than of a political opponent. (Applause.) Speaking of Mr Verrall, Mr Saunders said that he pitied him, as lie was going to Wellington with very few voluntary constituents, like an inexperienced youth, to try and fly paper kites. When he got there 1— -would i_cL the wind so high that it ilcL talo-—- ——i—. 2=.L—es ou.— to . — ux_lfcss t_em. „J.L«WiiluMMfll)li!t in reference to a. question put at Mr Verrall's meeting 1 , wheth r. when Mr Saunders was on the Civil Service Conimission, lie was paid _£_ a. day, _ad whether he made the period ot .. ——. Commission extend eight months, when its duties could have been reasonably completed in six weeks?

Mr SAUNDERS said he was obliged to the questioner for an opportunity to make an explanation. There was not the slightest truth in the statement to which the question pointed. As a member of the House at the time, he could not have received a penny for his services, or he would be at once brought under disqualification, and lose his seat. As to the eight months, he was, as Chairman of that Commission, best able to judge, and could say the Commission did work within eight months which it really required eighteen months to do well. As to his expenses while on the • Commission, some of them knew he lived in anything but an extravagant way, hence, while the expenses of one member ran up to £1-0, his expenses in the work of the Commission, and as its Chairman frequently travelling to places the other members did not go, from one end of the colony to the other, was only £63. (Applause.) | Mr Dixon said it gave him great pleasure to return his thanks to the electors! for the way In which the contest had been carried on, and to accept the kind things which Mr Saunders bad said about him. i In fact, he looked ou that gentleman more in the light of a political friend than an opponent. One of his main objects in coming into the election was an earnest desire to help to re-establish commercial confidence in the colony if elected. (Hear, hear.) He felt satisfied he could have materially assisted in that direction, and was satisfied that if Mr Verrall had been elected otherwise than by accident, the election would have gone far to destroy public confidence. It was unfortunate that the two candidates opposing Mr Verrall held similar views on most questions, and so divided their chances for return. The idea of starting a new kind of banking and an issue of current paper on Mr Verrall's plan, would increase the rate of interest to an appreciable extent, possibly from \ to 1 per cent. For bis part, he de-sired to encourage cheap capital without hampering it, so that by its means industries could be developed and labor profitably employed. They could neither do, without capital or lawyers, only the public should make the best o£ them. (Hear, hear.) Trivial matters often interfered to frighten capital away, aud injuiicious action on the part of the people could do a very great deal to destroy the prosperity of the colony. In conclusion, he thanked the electors for the kindness shown to him everywhere. (Applause.) He moved a hearty vote of thanks to the Returning Officer for the way ir which he had performed his duties. (Applause.) Mr Saunders seconded, saying that he was so far satisfied with the Returning Officer and his deputies that he had not thought it necessary to have a single scrutineer appointed. (Applause.) Mr Whitefoord, acknowledging the high compliment paid to him by the candidates, pointed out the advisableness for persons attending to a proper registration of their names in respect to seeing to the correct spelling, an exact description of their qualifications andoccupation, inattention 'to which when polling day came caused unnecessary trouble and annoyance to the officials, as well as to the persons themselves. He attributed the small number of votes recorded in the present election fb what farmers had since told him was the case, that they were busy with their farms, and some under the impression that the member elected was only put in for ono session, whereas the Parliament would have two sessions before its expiring.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18880731.2.33

Bibliographic details

ASHLEY ELECTION., Press, Volume XLV, Issue 7132, 31 July 1888

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1,256

ASHLEY ELECTION. Press, Volume XLV, Issue 7132, 31 July 1888

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