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LINCOLN.

The nomination for Lincoln took place at Kirwee at noon yesterday. Mr Turner proposed, and Mr Jamks Patterson seconded, Mr .John Davis Enys. Mr Gabbates proposed, and Mr Harvey Taylor seconded, Mr O'Callaghan. Mr T. H. Axson proposed Mr Saunders, in a speech in which he pointed out the need for a man who was a tried, proved, and able economist, not merely now, but in all his past work. Mr Samitel Bayly seconded the nomination of Mr Saunders, and said that he entirely agreed with the remarks of Mr Anson. They wanted a man with some back bone, and one who had done what he could for economy in the past. Mr John D. Enys spoke first, as his name stood first alphabetically. Mr John D. Enys stated he was not going to say that he believed the present Government were bound to go out, and would be succeeded by one formed from both sides of the House. He would be prepared to support any Government which should be formed that would do their best to retrench before they put on any further taxation, and woula act in a way to assist the country in its present difficulties. He would pledge himself to no man till he saw who would be returned, as he might point out that a prominent member of the Opposition was not sure of his return, as well as one or more of the present Ministers.

Mr O'Callaghan said that he claimed their support as one who had done his utmost for the Lincoln district in the past. He had always watched their interest, and had done everything that he could for the fanners. But what he most relied on was that he had supported the present Government, which was the only Government that had ever done justice to Canterbury. There was a good old saying that if a man cheated you once it was his fault; if he cheated you twice it was your fault. They should take care never again to trust Atkinson, Ormond, Mackenzie and other members of the present Opposition, who would do all they could against Canterbury. Jaaterbury was greatly indebted to the present Government for the Midland Railway. (Cries of " No, no.") He had no doubt that he should be again returned at the head of the poll. Mr Sadndees said that it was his fault that they were that day at an open nomination, as he had succesfully opposed the attempt to make all nominations secret. He entirely believed in both sides being compelled to state their case in the presence of an opponent able and willing to point out what was not true. This was especially needed now, as although the Coionial Treasurer never denied his own extravagant proposals, his less responsible supporters were daring to deny them wherever they could do so to an uninformed audience, and some had gone so far as to assert that the present Government were quite prepared to economise and not to tax. Mr O Callaghan had just given them an excellent motto —" If a man cheats you once it is his fault, if he cheats you twice it is your fault." Mr O'Callaghan had every opportunity to economise and to stop borrowing during the last six years, but had never attempted to do either. He had supported every loan that had been raised, and every extravagant expenditure that had followed. As much as possible had gone into his own pocket and into that of the two Ministries upon whom he had so equally divided his favors. Major Atkinson had enjoyed three years of his unconditional and unflinching support, and when the grain rates turned Major Atkinson out Sir Robert Stout and Sir Julius Vogel came in for their share of : the same honor. Mr O'Callaghan's action had never saved the colony sixpence, and he had net even brought any share of the plunder to his constituents", although he had made their property liable for eight or nine millions more borrowed money. Now he told them that no man could be more anxious to stop borrowing and to economise than he was. . Whilst in full power for six years he borrowed and spent all he could lay his hands on. Now he was very sorry, and would never do so again. We have only to take his own advice, and take care not to give him a second, or rather a third chance. The same might be said of the Government which he had supported, They too were promising to do in the future what they never did in the past. But wise men would take Mr O'Callaghan's advice, and never trust, them to pile any more borrowed money into their own pockets, or to heap any more taxation upon the oppressed taxpayers of this country. The show of hands was:— Saunders .. .. _ 23 Enrs _ _ .. 16 O'CaUa;han .. „ ..13

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18870920.2.55

Bibliographic details

LINCOLN., Press, Volume XLIV, Issue 6861, 20 September 1887

Word Count
817

LINCOLN. Press, Volume XLIV, Issue 6861, 20 September 1887

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