Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

COMPLIMENTARY BALL.

1 A compU-Bantary baU to Mr and Mrs Hulbert was given last night in the old Provincial Council Chamber. It was attended by 160 ladies and gentlemen, including his Excellency Sir William Jervois, and was a thoroughly enjoyable and successful affair. Dancing began at a quarter to nine on the arrival of Mr and Mrs Hulbert, and at a quarter past nine his ExceUency the Governor arrived. The Reception Committee was composed of Messrs H. P. Murray-Aynsiey, H. A. Watt and the Hon. E. C. J. Stevens. His ExceUency danced in the first qnadrUle -with Mrs.Hulbert, t-vra-m with Mr Hulbert and Mrs P. Cunningham. The other dance-JS in fie set were Colonel Brett and Mrs Watt 3 Mr Watt and Mrs E. C. 1 Stevens, tha Hon. J. T. Peaco< k and Mrs William Day, Mr Bhind and Mrs Pcs cock.

I Tne fine old building was beautifully decorated for the occasion. AU the corridors were arched with wreaths of delicate green, and splendid plants met the visitor's gaze at every turn. Besides numerous rare begonias in perfect foliage, several magnificent fuchsias, lent by Mr P. Cunningham, must be specially mentioned. They were in fuU and luxuriant flower, and attracted attention from everybody. On all Bides were flowers, flowers out, flowers in pots, and flowers twined. The Speaker's room, which was specially arranged as a private room for his Excellency, was fuU of them, and they profasely adorned the drawing-room, into whioh was transformed the Survey-office, map-room, and also Bellamy's, where supperwaslaid. Messrsßhind and Cunningham who were the Decoration Committee are to be thanked for these effects, and they were assisted by Mr Penfold and the Hon. E. C. J. Stevenß, with a staff of men from Meesrs Duncan and Son. The furnishing was done by Mr White and the catering by Mr Buggey. The wines were not rashly handed over to one individual, but were carefully selected by a Committee of the stewards. Tea and other light refreshments were to be obtained in the up-stairs room generally dedicated to the draughtsmen of the Survey Offioe. Two smaller offices were set apart as ladies' rooms, and the gentlemen got the use of the larger map room. The dance music was played by Mr Fleming's band. Returning to the ballroom it should be added that aU the embrasures of the windows contained handsome pot plante in bloom, the pots themselves being nearly hidden in cut flowers, and the white stone fronts of the galleries were adorned with festoons of green, the spaces of which were filled with wreaths of pink flowers. The CouncU Chamber with its rare and highly finished stonework and gorgeous Gothio roof, is admirable enough as ordinarily seen; but filled with people, and thus warmed and lighted and softened, it became indescribably beautiful. Dancing went on tiU eleven o'clock, when about eighty of the guests Bat down to supper. Supper being over, the Chairman (Mr Watt) proposed the "Health of the Queen," which was duly honored. The Chaieman then said that his ExceUency's presence there that night was no formal matter. Sir William Jervois was there helping them as citiaens of Christchuroh to do honor to Mr Hulbert, and they would aU agree with him that Sir William had at heart the welfare not only of this Cathedral City, but also of every city of New Zealand, and it was, therefore, with confidence that he asked them to respond heartily to this toast, the " Health of his ExceUency the Governor." The toast was enthusiastically honored. His Excellency said —Mr Watt and ladies and gentlemen—l thank you very much for the honor you have done mc in drinking my health, and I can assure yon that it gives mc great pleasure to be here on this occasion to do honor—and justly to do honor—to Mr Hulbert, your Mayor, as I have been given to understand, during the last two years. Although so much might be said by anyone who fully understands the importance of this occasion. I know you wiU not want to be bored by a long speech, yet let mc pay that I appreciate the value of the pubHe services whioh Mr Hulbert has rendered to tbe city of Chriatohureh, and J am sure that it is anticipating your own eentiments when I add that it would be impossible to overrate the feelings which by your presence here this evening you desire to express. I know something of the difficulties which Mayors have to go through, and especially the difficulties they have to deal with if they are surrounded by a number of rumbustious Cour> eillora. [Laughter.] But if lam informed correctly, Mr Hulbert has been spared many of those experiences, for he has found the City CouncU peculiarly amenable to his blandishments. At all events the results appear to show that such has been the case, for he has carried out so many important pubUc works that, as the results of his exertions in office, tbe city wiU benefit for years and years, and for generations to come. [Applause]. I will not enumerate those works, for, as I said before, you will not want mc to make a speech, and you aU know that they are neither few nor unimportant, and that when finished they will have a marked effect in improving and beautifying your city. Let mc merely congratulate you upon them, and say again that it gives mc great pleasure to be present here this evening to do honour—and justly to do honour—to Mr Hulbert. [Applause.] . The Chaibman said they were met in a social gathering to do honour to Mr and Mrs Hulbert, and to take an opportunity of thanking Mr Hulbert, in the name of the citizens of Christchurch, for the assiduous aud business-Uke manner in which he had conducted the affairs of the city during the two years he had sat in the Mayoral chair. The business man who undertook to fill that position—and let him say it was one of the most honourable duties a man could perform—deserved honour if he did weU— and Mr Hulbert bad done very weU, surprising not only his friends, but his opponents. [Applause.] He had no time to laudJMr Hulbert, but he would say, as a business man, that he had frequently met Mr Hulbert on matters connected with the Council's business, and he looked back with great pleasure on the quiet firmness and the gentlemanly manner with whioh Mr Hulbert had entered upon and carried through every transaction in which he had met him. He was sure they would aU wish tbat now he was about to retire on his laurels, he might enjoy every success in his private business.-And now it was his (the Chairman's) pleasing duty to hand to Mrs Hulbert a souvenir of Mr Hulberfs term of office. In years to come she would be able to look upon it, and be carrieed back by it to happy memories of the high position in which her husband steed in their midst, and of the goodwUl and esteem which his f eUow citizens bore him. " Gentlemen," the Chairman concluded, " Let us drink the health of Mr and Mrs Hulbert."

The toast was drunk to the accompaniment of considerable applause. The souvenir presented to Mrs Hulbert was a very handsome diamond bracelet. Mr Hulbeet, who was received with very hearty applause, said—Your Excellency, Mr Chairman, and ladies and gentlemen, you wiU believe that it is with great pleasure that I thank you for your great kindness to Mrs Hulbert and myself, and briefly express our deep appreciation of the honor whioh you have conferred on us to-night, an honor enhanced by the presence of his Exoellenoy the Governor. If there were wanted any incentive to a citizen to take his share of pubUo business and do his best for the community, that incentive would be suppued by the recognition of my humble efforts which your kindly feeling have prompted you to exhibit this evening. I do not admit or deny my chum to the compliment yon hare paid mc, but on behalf of my wife I thank you, Sir, for the costly gift you have presented to her, and also for the kindly remarks you have bestowed upon- myself, for I must own that it has been chiefly by her assistance that I have been able to perform my public duties, and gain your approbation. [Applause.] Let mc assure you that this compliment wiU not soon be forgotten, and that as Ions; as I live such leisure and ability as I possess shall 1 always be at the disposal of the citizens for the benefit and interests of the city for whose welfare I have always felt so deep a regard. [Applause.]

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18851223.2.23

Bibliographic details

COMPLIMENTARY BALL., Press, Volume XLII, Issue 6322, 23 December 1885

Word Count
1,462

COMPLIMENTARY BALL. Press, Volume XLII, Issue 6322, 23 December 1885

Working