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NEWS OF THE DAY.

Lttxxltok STABBise Cask.—The boy Leslie, -who was stabbed by Job Green on Saturday, is still in a precarious con-, dition. He is on board his ship, and attended to by Dr. McDonald. Green is imprisoned, and was remanded until Wednesday. St. Mabt% Mxbtvalx.—Mr W. H. Shaw has been elected to represent the parish of St. Mary's, Merivale, at the Synod of the Church of England. Mr W. Bl Mountfort has been elected to represent the PhDlipetown parish at the «s"n>ml meeting of the Diocesan Synod. Fibs.—An alarm was given in Bangiora on Saturday afternoon, and the Fire Brigade turned out with their two engines, to find that a stack of straw, with a small quantity of hay beside it, wae on fire. After pumping for about an hour the fie appeared to be extinguished, but it was found necessary to fake the engine out again at nine o'clock to completely put the fire out.

Boabd of Govxbnobs.—A special meeting of the Canterbury College Board of Governors is to be held next Monday afternoon, to consider what farther action shall be taken in connection with tbe reply which has been received from the Chancellor of the Senate relative to the reading of Terence's plays by students for an ordinary degree. ** ■ The Calkdonian Socxkty. —This body has offered two scholarships of the value of £20 for competition among children attending the Government schools in the North Canterbury Education District. The scholarship are to come under Class C, tenable for two years, after 31st Jane next, and cannot be held by any child exceeding thirteen years of age. One condition is that in the paper on British History three special questions shall be added on Scottish. History. One scholarship is \for children of Scottish parentage, and the other is open to all nationalities. Tsa Mmting.—A very successful sea and concert was held in the school-room, OarlntoTi, on Friday, the24£h inst. The tea was provided and presided over by the following ladies:—Mesdames Carter, Cowans, Englebzeoht, Museon, Elliot, and th 6 Misses Dohemwn. After the tea a very enjoyable entertainment was held, the programme consisting of pianoforte and violin solos, vocal solos, duets, trios, and readings. The chair was taken by Mr Higgine, of Cost, and tie following ladies and gentlemen took part in the g«t CT **' Jl iT" T T t 'iit:—-Blisses Schelden, Higgins, Thompson, Bey. Wyatt, and Messrs Lewis, Haasel, Horrell, Fagg, Carter, Head, Kutgsbury, Midgeley, Sale 03)* and McCullough. The proceeds of the entertainment are to be devoted to the purchase of ecbool prizes and to (he library fancL

East Malvxbn.—At a meeting of the East Malvern Band members in the Library, Sheffield, it was deciddd to get up a concert and ball at Annat about the end of May, in aid of the BandY fund*. The members of this Band are making Very progresj under theirinstructor, Mr Thome. ' . :,'.£"■ ' ' •' * . ....

TJJffi. Fans Csobch, Banqioba.—The Bey. H. B. Bedstone conducted the anniversary services in this Canichon. Sunday last, preaching both morning and evening to good congregations. In the afternoon a children's meeting was held, the Bey. H. B. Bedstone presiding, when.- recitations and readings were given by the children, and teachers. '"!

Snzmo a Coach and Hobsbs.—A very unusual spectacle waa witnessed in town yesterday, and gave smnument to the spectators, bat certainly not to the victim of the occurrence. The Halawell coach, driven by J. Smith, who is its proprietor, was publicly seized by the bailiffs, and driven under their charge to a hostelry, from which it may not start for the Junction Hotel for some time. Smith is a foreigner, and in distinct bat broken English vehemently complained of the action of the man who had moved the law, and positively asserted that the bailiffs had been pnt on for a paltry 183. However this may have been, instructions were evidently followed, as the three hones were stalled and the eoaoa placed under supervision. '

Co ofkbattte Society.—The adjourned general meeting of the Sydenham Working Men's Cu-Operative Money Club was held on Saturday evening last in the Oddfellows' Hall, Sydenham. The preaU dent (W. Langdown, Esq.), occupied the chair, and a fair number of members were present. The business of "the evening was the revising of the rules and appointing a committee to see. after registration of same, and election of one committeeman in the place vacated by Jtho new secretary. .The rules, which comprise twenty working and ten financial, were passed with dispatch; Messrs E. Jones, J. B. Brunt, and A. Pascoe were appointed as the committee, and Mr W. Miller to thevacant place "off the committee. After several other minor matters had been attended to, the meeting further adjourned until Saturday next. - Thb Late Mb Ick.—The many friends of the late Mr C. T. Ick will learn with regret his decease, which took place yesterday at his residence, Papinui road. Mr lok arrived in Otago in 185S, and entered into business in Dunedin. He retired in 1863, and purchased a farm at Waikouaiti, where he resided till 1870, when he came to reside in Christchurch. He was in business here till 1882, when he retired. Hβ was a member of the City Council for some years, during which period he took an active interest in the works of the city, being the chairman of the Works Committee for some years. In 1879 he was elected Mayor o? Christchurch, and on the completion of his- term of office was re-elected for another term. He was also a member of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, and was Chairman of the Benevolent Aid Association, a work in which he took a great interest. The deceased gentleman had been in delicate health for some time, but his decease was somewhat sadden. ■; A Double Mishap.—A little before one o'clock yesterday, the horse attached to a carrier's cart bolted from the' Cathedral square rank and collided with the buggy of Dr. Stewart at Brice's corner. Dr. Stewart was thrown out and bruised, and cut about the hands. His trap was somewhat damaged. The runaway continued its career, with its dray, along Hereford etreefc, and ran into the trap of Mr T. Wilson, opposite the Union Bank. Mr Wilson, by the force of the collision was thrown from his seat, but was uninjured, 'i'his vehicle suffered most, being irreparably smashed. Nothing daunted by these stoppages, the headstrong animal proceeded on its journey and pulled up after reaching Carew's stables, neither it nor the van suffering .nuch injury. Mr C. Bush is the owner of the horse which ran away, and accounts for the casualty by the fact of the blinkers falling from the animal's head and frightening it while it was feeding in the square. '^ I Thkatbb Botad. —".The Shaa'hraun " formed the bill at the Theatre last night, aid the management deserve the utmost credit for the way in which the piece was put on the stage, the scenery and mechanical effects being excellent, especially the' abbey ruin? by moonlight. Miss Maggie Knight played Clare Ffolliett capitally throughout, giving the part with just that least taste of the brogue which made it most interesting. Miss K*te Douglas was good as Arte O'Neill, and Miss Jennie Bryce made a vivacious Moya. Mr Leitch's Conn was fairly good, though it was somewhat after the style of Jaikes' in the " Silver King" in parts. Still,i( was a good representation of the character, but not to be compared with those we have had before, especially the Conn of Mr Wheatleigh. Mr Appleton was somewhat stiff as .Capt. Molyneux, and Bobert Ffolliett was a little beyond Mc Gerald. Mr Jewett deserves great credit for bis Corry Kinchela, which alike in make up and acting was excellent. Mr B. Vernon gave another proof of his, cleverness as a character actor in the part of Father Doolan, which was one of the beat played parts in the piece, and Mr Harcoart was thoroughly at home in the character of that prince of villains, Harvey Duff. The other characters were well filled, and as already stated, the piece was admirably pnt on the stage. It will be repeated to-night. Excitation Contest. — A novel entertainment was provided last night at the Lecture Hall of the Young Men's Christian Association, when a number of valuable prizes were competed for by ladies and gentlemen students of elocution. The awards vere made by vote of the audience, an adjudication which, .is believed to be the first of the kind made here. The chairwas occupied by the Bey. Mrlsitt,who announced with regret that the promoter of the competition was unable through illness to be present. The pretty little room was tolerably well filled, and the result of the voting showed that the audience were not wanting in skill as critics. The programme, as planned, was not carried out, owing to the unavoidable absence of some who were to speak, but, on the whole, the contributions were well rendered, and the results sufficiently encouraging as to warraat the expectation of the Chairman that in their next effort their progress would be more marked. Of three ladies [who contributed Mrs Delamare, for her rendering of "The Night After the Battle," received a majority of votes in her favor. It was a spirited piece of declamation. Miss May Ball also was much applauded for "Mary,. Queen of Scots." Of the gentlemen, Mr D. N. Adams, with "The Slave who Saved St: Michael's"; MrHubbard's "My T7nde"j Mr Lindsay's "A Scene from a Sea Captain's Story"; andMrßier's "Barbara Friohet," were the most deserving. With the benediction a most enjoyable evening terminated.

Ctcling —The presentation of prizes in connection with the Christohurch Bicycle Club takes place at the Central Hotel, at 8 o'clock this evening. KAIAPOI VpLUBTBXB COMPANT.—The meeting to decide the question of forming a Volunteer company takes place this evening. Nobtb Bxlt Pbxsbytxbiah Chubcs.— The tea and public meeting in connection with the above church will be held tonight. Applud Scixnci.—Professor Bickerton will give the first of his series of twelve experimental lectures on " Technology or Applied Science," this evening, at the Chemical Lecture Theatre of Canterbury College. U.A.O J}.— The members of th-> Sydenham Lodge of Druids are reminded by an advertisement in another column that the next meeting on Wednesday night will be a summoned one, to consider the offer tbe Grand Lodge of Australia have made I for the formation of District Grand Lodges : in New Zealand.

; CHCBCHitsar's Club.—A gathering in connection with (he above will be held at the rooms this evening, when solos will be given by Misses A. 8. Taylor, L. Mason, Parkerson, and Mr Hogg. There will also be given—a selection from "Kins Bene'e Daughter," vocal trios by a choir of ladies, concertina solo by Mies Jj. Taylor, and piano solo by Miss B. Boss. Mr and Mrs B. T. Booth will be at home this afternoon, at the residence of Mr F. S. Malcolm, llam road, Biocartoa.

Bowikq Clubs.—A meeting of the C.B.C. and U.K.C. will be held to-night at Warner's Hotel, to consider the formation of a Volunteer Corps.

A Visa TO rag BATTLX-rxßXDS.—Were is a grim awl ghastly detail of the realities of war, supplied by the special correspondent of the "Dally Chronicle," who,on hie way back to Gakdul,paid a visit to the battle-field of Abu Klea. The correspondent tare—lt presented a horrible spectacle. The desert for nearly a mile was strewn with the bodies of the slaughtered Arabs. Oα oar approach great numbers of cirrion birds rose lazily from their sickening feast. They oontinned to hover around, however, until oar departure. The corps as had already been shrivelled by the great heat and the dry air of the desert to the proportions and semblance of mommies, with this difference, that they lay twisted in every variety of contortion. In many instances the white bones, stripped of their covering by the foul birds, stared up at the beholder. Truly a sickening sight, and one to be remembered with a ahadder.

Abyssinia and the Soudan.— The "Mabaehir" learns from Maasowah that the fall of Khartoum will probably turn the current of politics in Abyssinia. Not only are there 3000 Abyssmians in Khartoum, abandoned'to the Mahdi's mercy, but since all the country between the White and Blue Nile is in the Mahdi's power he has become the immediate neighboar of the Negus, and it is very probable that the two will soon commence hostilities, which the fact that one is a fervent Mahomedan and the other a fervent Christian will certainly not mitigate. The Abyssinians hold the belief that within three months an army will cross the Blue Nile and invade the Mahdi's territory. The Apostolic Vicar in Central Africa, Mgr. Francesco Ssgaro, has addressed a second letter to the Vienna "Political Correspondence, in which he begs the English not to advance on foot from Souakim to Berber, as they cannot imagine, he says, what hardships they would have to go through on this arid desert road. Even (if they gained a victory over Osman Digna, their farther advanca would be impeded by the everhovering forces of the Mahdi, who, having had no tiring marches and hardships to overcome, wo old be in fall vigour, besides numbering four times the British, force. His advice is to make a railway, and advance no further than the rails, reach. Inspection of the Bemnant 07 Gobdon's Abut.—Lord Wolseley inspected at Korti, on March Ist, Gordon's people, and told them that he and the English army were glad to meet the men who had stood S3 faithfully by our countrymen. Hβ aesuied them the English must stay in the Soudan a hundred years if necessary, until the Mahdi's power was broken. He hoped they would be with him when he entered Khartoum. He thanked them in his own name and that of the army for the careful way in which they had carried the wounded Englishmen across the desert. They would receive three months* pay now, and two months* more when money came to hand, also everything farther due would be paid and all Gordon's promises fulfilled. They knew Gordon's word was true, and they would find every Englishman's word the same. He would be as careful of them as Gordon would be. Nusri Pasha, their chief, replied that he and all his men were proud to meet Wolseley and the English army, deeply regretting the fall of Gordon, to whom all were devoted. He hoped the British would crash the Mahdi and stamp out the rebellion, which was ruining the country. Then followed three cheers in Arabic fashion for the English and Lord Wolseley. Sir Charles Wilson presented a captain of artillery and an engineer for distinguished conduct on the steamers, also a man from Morocco. The assembly, says a correspondent, was a motley one; every type of face was to be seen, from the handsome Circassian to the hideous negro. PABIBIANS and NovaLTT.—" The Parisians are always keen for any eosial novelty, and willing to take any hint from any nationality," says the " Daily News." "IV was an Austrian lady who suggested the idea of receptions at which the, guests should adopt the costume of one nation, and have the music and the dances to Euit. The Polish costume was very becoming, especially for man. The polonaise wag much danced, and other figure? were made, if not popular, at lea3t jknown, and Chopin was, of ourse, the composer of the evening. A Spanish night was even more successful. There might have been a private bull fight going on in the Boulevard Malesherbes, so many picadors and toreadors were to be seen going in. The cachuca gave novelty, and all the swarthy French beauties were delighted with their costumes and their appearance. But the catalogue of nations soon got exhausted. Bussia proved the" Moscow of the campaign; for the dresses were very ugly, and though gome of the national music was weird and melancholy, and some of the Russian dishes —for, to obtain absolute uniformity of idea, the sapper wai &3 national as the dance—were curious and attractive, still, unbecoming toilettss proved to be the rale, and that was a rule which no conscientious Parisienne could-be expected to observe. It wa3 necessary to introduce a further novelty, which comes in very tamely indeed alter the brilliancy of its predecessor. It is an American idea. The hostess commences her reception with theatricals. Her guests are invited to the theatre, for which four, five, or six boxes are taken, according to the number of her party. Afterwards they drive on to supper, and after sapper comee the ball. Ie is at the Gymnase that the experiment has chiefly been tried, but indeed all the managers seem anxious heartily to support the latest novelty." ; An Indian Opinion on thb Soudan.— The "Times of India" quotef from one of the principal Indian native papers some extracts which are held to indicate the views taken by that section of the Press, and by the natives as a rule, with regard to affaire in the Soudan and the death of General Gordon. Of the Mahdi it writes— "How au intelligent, not to say loyal, countryman of ours can, for a single moment, mistake the pretensions of the leader of the Soudanese rebellion for the sacred and divinely-inspired and promised Mahdi, whose mission on earth is not fierce revolt and isolated action, we cannot even imagine. Would our Prophet have chot>en a remorseless quondam slave dealer to, inaugurate a new era of his and our revered faith? Would he have permitted his chosen delegate to unfurl the flag of revolt against the supreme ruler of our coreligionists as the first act of his mission ? What use has this pretender made of his self-assumed offioa? Only to rally more men and money round his cause. Wβ trust that our countrymen and co-religionists will neither diegrace themselves nor their sacred religion by having anything in common with him who is now disturbing the public peace of one of the most unfortunate countries in the world." As to General Gordon and his fate, it is remarked :—" A man of such leonine courage is the property of no particular sect or nation. He belongs to the whole human race, and can chum a respect and sympathy from friends and foes alike. Of course, if he was cat down in actual fight, his death can be laid against no one, bat if, perchance, he has not thus fallen his person ought to be as secure from ill-treat-ment and insult, and as much an object of reverence and respect as it would be if he was among his own people. There is no doubt that if such as he fell into the hands of our co-religionists when the crescent was the most triumphant battle flagin the world, he would have received all homage and praise, in fact received everything but a freedom that would be immediately turned against hie foes. A nation that beautified the two ends of Europe with the Alhambra and the marble cupolas and minarets of Byzantium cannot afford to dim the lustre of its past with the foul murder of a hero like Gordon. If, however, blind and furious fanatic rage has been allowed to tamiah a chivalry such as ours has been, then we disclaim all sympathy with a cause so forgetful of what is due to itself, and we heartily wish the same and more to be done to those who in showing no mercy or chivalrous admiration of high-minded and pure courage, deserve nothingbutslaughter and fire and sword from their enemies."

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18850428.2.10

Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY., Press, Volume XLI, Issue 6118, 28 April 1885

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3,269

NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume XLI, Issue 6118, 28 April 1885

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