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THE INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION.

Tbxtilb Fabrics. The next department which requires notice under the class which has beenueieeted for description is that connected with the hat industoy. Tbis, alike with our wooUen industries, though in a smaller degree, has made marked progress amongst 'is. It ia only a few years ago since the market was almost entirely filled with imported goods, and in this line alone a very considerable amount of money was sent out of the colony. Now, however, this is altered, and instead of the imported article, tbat manufactured here is w*ra almost exclusively. Only two exhibitors in this -lata are. represented, and the first to claim attention is the exhibit of KB 0. P. HULB-BT. This case of Mr Hulbert'a contains some hundred and fifty different varieties of hate, cape, Ac, comprising aU descriptions of head covering, ranging from the thapeau a la dude to that of the Primate* The growth of Mr Hulbert's factory, though gradual, has yet been exceedingly marked. During the past few months a new brick factory and warehouse has beeadded to the High street premises, and the latest improvements in hat making; machinery introduced. At present there ere about twenty hands employed, the number of finished hats produced per week being about twelve dozen, besides tweed hate, caps, Ac T—»lines of manufacture include all kinds of academical, military, &c, in addition to the ordinary description of hat. The pro- - duction of academical hats is a speciality of the establishment, as it supplies all the professors, masters, and students of the New Zealand University in various parte of the colony. The manufacture of hate , for ordinary wear ia confined to the better qualities, it being impossible, without very expensive machinery, to compete with thai—ported article in tbe inferior kinds. In the production of the hate turned out only the finest French felt is used, speciaUy imported. The case in the Exhibition* though badly placed as to lighting at night, is one of the features of the display. Below this exhibit, and in the name avenue, ia that of KESBSB HALLAH-mH AMD CO. This firm exhibits a case containing some thirty-six different samples. of hate and •apa. The manufacture of hats, Ac, was added to the present business of the firm some twelve n-ontho ago, when there were only three hands employed. These are now increased, to nine> The firm used previously to import eJavge number of hatpin the eourae of their trade, but have now discontinued this,, and _*nuiGaoture all kinds themselvejuso keeping the numey in the country.. The Arm have in the establishment two rooms where the manufacturing and trimming of the hate is carried on. The Unea n>anufactured include ea_u for the raflway officials, for which Ballantyne and Co. have. the contract, as also for the supply sf hate to warders of aU the gaols in New Ze—l—-fit and police shakos. In mflitary hats the firm exhibit helmets, caps, Ac., similar to those suppUed to. several companies of volunteers. Coachmen's hate are also ex-* hibited, with cockade and silver band. The> ' other specimens exhibited rang© from boys* hats to the best silk beU-topper. In addition to the manufacture of hate, Measra Ballantyne and Co. now largely make m their own clothing from New Zealand tweed instead of, as formerly, importing them. In this department of then* business they employ thirty-three hand*. To give an idea of the extent of the business of the firm it may be mentioned that there are employed at present a total number of 136 persona a* Dm*itable House. This is es-usVre of «>** employed out doors by the—rm, Hfcjt' Pottssy ato Finn Cult Goom* . Digressing for a brief space ««*_J_* particular section under review, may be made to another industry _«"*£ now making great strides—vis., duction of pottery and fire <%Z a g?t. One of the principal etfdMte fa this line i* tha* of i-*s

XBBSBS FORD AND OGDON. The pottery works of Messrs Ford and *Ogdon, who have a large exhibit in various lines of this industry, are situate at South Malvern. Mr Ford has been engaged in prospecting for some twenty-five years in the Malvern hills, and some tour years ago making fire bricks and drain pipes. -Since then and during the last six months pottery has been added to the articles produced at the works. There are about twenty hands employed at the works and the df pot in Christchurch where the manufactured articles are received. The works axe so situate aa to utilise the railway - communication to the utmost, aa a direct siding goes from the Malvern Une into the works. To facilitate the distribution of the material over the works the firm have laid down nearly a mile of Fowler and Co.'s steel rails, thus ensuring rapid and easy communication with all parts of the works. The steam power employed at the works when fuUy erected wfll comprise one engine of 40 h.p. and one of 20 h.p. The machinery now in use comprises a complete plant for the sanitary and drain pipe manufacture, pressed jfericks, and fire bricks. This plant comprises all the latest patents in the different branches of the industry, having been spe--ciaUy selected by Mr Ford during his visit -to England for that purpose. The pottery machinery, which haa only recently been -added, comprises all the modern appli- ■ ancea f*r pottery. In order to enable -visitors to get some idea of the extent of the works, two pictures are displayed in the bay occupied by the firm. Since -these were executed, however, several -additions have been made. These comprise amongst others a pottery kiln, extensive drying sheds, rooms for manufac-turing-and drying pottery, all of which are substantially built of brick. A large house for the residence ef one of the firm, manager's house, Ac., have been built, and it is in contemplation to build cottages for these employed in the #orks. The water used in the works is supplied from a reservoir constructed by the firm from plans hy Mr E. Dobson. The reservoir is so situate as to enable a water supply to be -carried to every department of ttle works. The pressure is such as to raise the water to the top storey of the building. The of the firm comprise aU kinds of sanitary and drain pipes, aUkinds of bricks used in building purposes, fire bricks, tiles, Ac., garden tiles, Ac. In the pottery exhibits there are bread pans, pickle jars, -flower pots, butter crocks, fern pots, and a -quantity of domestic pottery of aU kinds. Messrs Ford and Ogdon exhibit samples of the clays used in pottery, and ganister, and Are clayß used in the manufacture of fire bricks. About twenty different kinds of clays are exhibited, taken from seams ranging from five to forty-five feet in thickness, the total amounting to over two hundred feet. As an instance of the quality •of these clays it may be noted that Professor Bickerton in a lecture deUvered by Mm after paying a visit to the works, and -analysing the clays, stated that for quality, variety, and quantity they were unique in the world. During Mr Ford's stay in England he visited all the principal pottery works in Great Britain, and on submitting samples of the. Malvern Hills clays was told that they got none to excel, and few to equal them. Samples of minerals from the Malvern [district are also exhibited, <comprising ironstone, marble, manganese, glass and casting sand. There is a sample of hematite paint ground on the works. In the centre of the bay is a case of specimens of native gems, consisting of axnythysts, agates, cornelian, jasper, onyx and Isardcmyx,bloodstonee,rubieß;garnetß,opals, v and also alluvial gold and auriferous quartz. The alluvial gold was obtained from the ground now under prospect by the Phoenix Prospecting Company; and the quartz Vrithin a radius of seven miles from" the prospect. The specimens were obtained within fifty miles of Christchurch. From indications in the locaUty there can be but Uttle doubt of payable gold being eventuaUy discovered. The whole exhibit is a very exceUent one, and is interesting from -the fact that it is essentially the result of the energy and perseverance of the firm, and also an evidence ot the special efforts ot Messrs Ford And Ogdon aa prospectors. The community therefore cannot but be indebted to a large extent to them for the establishment and development of an industry which has taken Buch great Btrides during the past few years, almost entirely -doing away with imported goods. This industry, it must also be remembered, provides employment for a large number of persona, which, as it goes on, will be genexally increased. Looked at in this Ught, the exhibit of Messrs Ford and Ogdon is one of the most interesting in the Exhibition, and will weU repay a careful examination on the part of the visitor. Aspe«—_ty in connection with it is the display of samples of coal, -representing seams of from three to "eight feet in thickness, amounting to over seventy feet in tbe aggregate, discovered by Messrs Ford and Ogdon. '

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THE INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION., Press, Volume XXXIX, Issue 5700, 26 December 1883

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THE INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION. Press, Volume XXXIX, Issue 5700, 26 December 1883

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