Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

RACING IN ENGLAND.

THE LEGER DAY. [From "The Times."] Rarely does snch weather as is now gUddening the hearts of northern farmers shine 6u tkt pit f ftifivil whiek ktay all Yftrkabire keeps. Wet Legera, ani cold, d»sty I»?gers, and Legere of thick fog and gloom we have had in abundance; bat the memories of old racegoers are stirred this morning to recall snch a day aa this, big with the fate and hopea of many. That the weather had any perceptible influence on the attendance we do not believe. Wet or fine, a I*ger crowd of gentle and simple is a Leger crowd unchanged and unchangeable. Perhaps there might have been a few hundreds more on the Town Moor than last year; we cannot say. All we know is that there was the same long and apparently never-ending procession to the coarsa (the which, often as it has been seen and described, is yet a novelty), the same densely-packed mass of humanity on the stands, the same vast crowd on the course. It was* Leger Day made to order. That the great race was as hard a nut to crack and as interesting a topic to discuss as any of its predecessors there can be no doubt. A ve.-y open race was it aleo, and one fiom which many experienced racing men foond it difficult to select a fancy. The claims of some half-dozen horses were so evenly balanced, and the market had been m> tame, that there was no strong favorite. It was a common remark at the Rooms ou Monday night th»t Insulaire ought so have been at half the price he was then quoted at (4 to 1) and why he was not it is difficult to explain except on the ground of everything dee being backed, including even the sunposer> dead-and-gone Beauclerc The position of this horse in the market since his mishap during the York meeting has been one of the puzzles of the Leger. It seemed at first as if hie case was hopeless, and Beaudare would most certainly have been knocked out but for the support accorded him by his owner and those connected with the stable. The more the whole outride

public of touts, amateur and professional, declared that he was ap untrained horae, and therefore could not win, the more money did the stable p«t on. It was a war of opinions. Untrained horses have won great races, and when B'air AthoV's white face was seen in front at Epsom winning tbe Der'-y «f 1864 in a canter, be had been fed for a f rt night previously, it was said, on green food. ! But Blair AthoVwas an exceptional borse, and, good as Beauclerc unnloui tedly U, thtre is no reason to suppose he i% a wonder Fxml Falmouth's two, Jeannette and Childeric. were until last week in a somewhat doubtful position, and which was the better of the two was a matter of no small discussion until the announcement that Archer would ride the mare pointed to the Oaks winner as the one And yet we have reason for stating that Lord FVnioatb. did not very greatly fancy either, and in reply to an intimate friend who asked him which of the two he should back, said he really could not advise him. Of the others, Red Archer, the new comer Master Kildare, Attain?, ''locher, &c, there were their private and public performances to speak for them. The fact that Red Archer bad been beaten in his trial, and that, as stated, Master Kildare was the same as having Advance in the Leger at 9st, did not materially interfere with their market statvs. Ago -A deal of money went on Clocher, and, from lusulaire's rather dubious position, an (idea got abroad that the Insulaire people were "going" for v». Delatre's horse, which was very probably a great untruth.

The paddock was, of course, thronged with people, eager to see the cracks, and Insulaire and Beanclerc were mobbed directly they appeared. " The little black," as it is the fashion to call Insulaire, looked perfectly trained, and the only fault that cou'd be found with him was that he was hardly big enough. Beauclerc was as handsome as paint, but it struck us he had not grown, and there were the ominous band<ge* on his fore legs that were not encouraging. Perhaps one of the best-trained horses was Bed Archer, a fine lengthy chesnut, but a trifle elack-loined ; and Master Kildare looted a wear-and-tear sort of horse who, in Turf phraseology, would stay for a week. Lord Falmouth's two we did not see.

THE BAOE. The St. Leger Stakes of 25 soys each, for three-year olds ; colts, Bst 101b; fillies. Bst 51b. New St. Leger Conrse (about one m le, six f arlongs, and 132 yards.) 243 subs. Lord Falmonth's Jannette, by Lord Clifden— Chevisaunce ... ... (P. Archer) 1 Lcrd F.l uouth's Chimeric ... (Custance) 2 Lord Lonsdale's M ser Kildare ... (Glover) 3 Boniface, Eau de Vie, Ked Arch-r, < 'locher, Map pie ton, Glengarry, Attalu-, Castlereagh, Beanclerc, I sukire and Potentate al o ran. Sharp weighed for Mr Stephenson's Yager, but on his way to the post Castlereagh struck out,, and we are sorry to record b oke the poor lad's leg, who was at once removed to the infirmary. BeHing —s to 2 agst Jannefte, 7to 2 agst Insulaire, 10 to 1 agst Childeric. 100 to 8 each agst Beauclerc, Master Kildare, Red Archer, and Clocher, 100 to 6 agst Attains, 25 to 1 agst Castle' eagh, and 50 o I each Bonif acft and de Vie.

Mr M'George did not have them long on band, but after the parade led them down to the new post, and dropped his .flag to a ca ital start, about ten minutes beyond the appointed time. The colors of Glengarry were fir<t seen to draw to the front, Wowed by Boniface and Master Kildare, and it wai only in the straight that Mr Houldsworth'a second «-triDg disappeared; at the bend for home Red Archer, Irisulaire, and Beauclerc all more or less flatfe ed their backers, but they were S"on after beaten, and Archer, bringing up Jannette, split Childeric and Master Kildare, and won with gr£at case by four lengths. So for the second year in succession has Lord Falmouth been first and second ; and with the young horses that his Lordship has in training, it is quite on the cards that the Derby, as well as the Leger, of' 79 will be taken by him too. Jannette has followed worthily in the steps of her sire, Lord Clifden, and has proved herself possessed of undeniable etaying qualities, in addition to a fine s"f>ed.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18781102.2.16

Bibliographic details

RACING IN ENGLAND., Press, Volume XXX, Issue 4140, 2 November 1878

Word Count
1,118

RACING IN ENGLAND. Press, Volume XXX, Issue 4140, 2 November 1878

Working