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NEWS OF THE DAY.

: Masoxio. —The monthly meeting of the Lodge of Unanimity will be held this evening at 7.30 p.m.

Habewood Road.—The annual meeting of subscribers to' the Harewood road Public Library will be held on Tuesday, the 80th instant.

Cabtbbbubt Abchxbt Oiub.—The closing day.for ihitseaeon of the above-named club will be Saturday next, when prize firing is to begin at a quarter-past two in the afternoon.

, Ltttkltoh Wihtbb Etbniko Readings. — The opening entertainment in connection with these evening readings has been postponed till the 2nd May.

The Accident oh Biccabtoit Road.—An inquest will be held at the Hospital at 2 p.m. to-day on the body of Matthew Kinsman, .who was run over by a coach on the Ricoarton road on Tuesday.; ' ■.■■•••••■;• T

J SwnrowHe on. raa Bacbcottbsb.—Some instructive details as to some of the practices of the racecourse will be found in the report of -yesterday's business at the Magistrate's Court. The case's appeared to excite an unusual amount of interest;.

Theatbb Eotal.—" The Handsome Husband," and the, burlesque of "Turko, the Terrible," formed the bill at the Theatre last night. This evening the first piece will be "Ihe Fast Train," with Mr Hoskins as Jack Delaware. . The burlesque will be repeated.

Ohampagnb Siaebs, 1879.—The nomine, tions for the Champagne Stakes of 1879 cloied at Radcliffe's Hotel last evening. The number of youngsters nominated was twentysix, and .a glance at the pedigrees will show that there Iff g_reat quality amongtt them- The particulars will be found elsewhere.

TJhb Middib Pake Stttd.—Telegraphie information was yesterday received by the Middle Park Stud 'Company of tie purchase, fan .their account, at Mr Cox's sale in.Sydney, of a colt named St. George, own /brother to Chester and Boodee. The price paid was 1300 guineas. Aβ will be seen elsewhere, the colt is nominated.for our own Champagne of 1879. ,;■.; /.. ~:' ■ ; . -..

'J. ! Gaiktc very amateur performance was given last evening at .the Gaiety Theatre for the benefit of Mr Quarterman,.who met with a very severe accident some little-time back on the railway. There was a capital .attendance, and those taking part in the performance deserve credit, not only for their kindly assistance in the aiatfcer, but also for the admirable manner in which one and all went through their performance.: ~j

ChBISTCHUBOH MITTOAI. lirPHOVBJfBHT AseooiAWOif.—A aweting ef ■ this aseodatibnl took place last night, when Mr Qonnal (vice-, president) occupied the chair. After the' business had been disposed of, Mr 0. F. Exall read a paper on ; f'The importance of eoientific study." He then illustrated the working of the telephone, exhibiting, a. : set of instruments which were tested by all present to their entire satisfaction. A vote of thanks was then carried to Mr Exall, and the meeting was closed with the benediction. ; I)b. Somebvtlib.—-Dr. Sommerville last night addressed a meeting of men at r 6t. Paul's Church../ The buildiDg was crowded. The text of the discourse was the 24th verse of the 23rd chapter of Job. It was announced that the last opportunity for hearing Dr. SommrvOle in Christchuroh will •"be en Friday night, at the Theatre Boyal, On this occasion the subject of the address will be the " Fiery .furnace." At the close of the meeting laiat night an meeting " rjras held.

Accident at Ltttbiton.—A man named Paul Guarange met with, a severe accident 'yesterday afternoon. He was working in the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company's shed in port, when a pile of sacks of wheat fell on him, completely burying him. About eighty sacks had to be removed before the unfortunate man was extricated, and his helpers at one time thought he would never be rescued alive. However, thanks to the energy shown, the removal of the grain was speedily accomplished, and Guarange, though suffering much, was found to be conscious. Dr Donald was speedily in attendance, and had the sufferer removed to the casual ward. Several of the man's ribs were broken, and it is probable that he wQI be found to have sustained other injuries.

The Ghsmak Cnvß.cn.—ln addition to the present of a few friends mentioned in a former issue, the congregation of the German Church have presented the Bey. Mr Lohr, late pastor of the church, with a sum of £250, on the occasion of hie returning to Europe by the ship EHora, which leaves Lyttelton thu week. . This sum was raised parUj by private subscription, the balance being made up by the trustees from the church fond. An impression seems to hire got abroad that the church will be permanently dosed, owing to the congregation not being able to bear the expense of a pastor. This, it is hoped, will be tnroided, as although several prominent members have withdrawn from the church, an effort is about to be made to procure a clergyman in title colonies whose colonial experience wQI enable him to understand the difficulties of the position. In the meantime the truateea intend letting the church to aome religious body, with the right of taking it over when » clergyman has Mfß •ippoiqted.

Obopputs Leases.—The prices obtained at a late auction by Messrs Bullock and Co. for land let for one year's crop of wheat, show conclusively the value of land for cropping purposes in the neighborhood of Ashbnrton. A report of the sale appears in the usual place. Ambbblbt. — The Bey. E. Freeman preached his farewell sermon in Amberley Church on Sunday morning last to a crowded congregation. He will leave shortly for Tasmania, where most of his family reside, and he carries with him the very beet wishes of his late parishioners. Wakaktjt Fubxio Ltbbabt.—The annual meeting of members of the above library, which was to have been held on Tuesday, lapsed, as there were only six members present, and the Public Libraries Ordinance -requires- -that eight members shall" fdiM a quorum. ........ , PoßT&irr of thb Matob.—ln accordance with established usage his Worship the Mayor has presented his portrait to the City Council to be placed alongside the other* at present in the Council Chamber. ' The likeness, which ia an excellent one, haa been: executed by Mr N. Ef=Chenrill. The picture v set in a maeavei gilt frame. - - : Ihqpbbt.—An inquest was held yesterday at the Hospital touching the death of the man who was found dead in' a drain at Meadow Farm on Monday morning. Only two witnesses were examined, and from their evidence it appeared probable that deceased's name was John Say, and that he had been drowned on the night of the 13th instant. The police have been unable to learn any particulars as to his antecedents. The jury returned a verdict of " Found drowned. ,, ',

Dog Show.—The first annual show oE dogs took place at TattereaU's- yesterday, and was a complete success. The entries were numerous and showed plenty of quality. The attendance of the public was very large during the day. All the classes were well represented, and few people were aware until yesterday that Canterbury possessed >o many really high class dogs. The committee and hpn. Eec, Mr Dumergue, were indefatigable' in their endeavors to make the aiLdr a success and they did so most fully. An account of the show and tke prize list will be found elsewhere.

Lakebidh Libbaby.—There was a very good attendance of subscribers at the annual meeting held in the schoolroom on the 17th April. Mr Allan Bell (chairman of the outgoing committee) produced a statement of accounts which had been duly audited. The statement showed a credit balance of £6 3s 9d lodged in the Bank. The statement was received and adopted. The following- committee were elected for the year :—Messrs'A. Bell, F.Orerton, R. Mcllraith, J. McPherson; and W. Matthews. At a subsequent meeting of committee, Mr A. Bell was re-elected chairman, and Mr F. Overton, hon. secretary and treasurer. . ' ■

BILKSMKBB BACOH-CtrBIKQ COJtPAKT.— A.meeting of the directors of this company; was held at Loe's Leeston Hotel, on Tuesday evening. Mr W. J. G. Bluett occupied the chair. After considerable discussion the price to be given for pigs was fixed at 4d per lb. on and after the Ist May next. Bight 'applications for the office of working manager were received. The number to be entertained was reduced to three, and the decision left in the bands of Mr Bluett, who was, requested to consult the referees. Fay sheet No. 2 (£54 19s sd) was passed for payment. Mr Serjeant feftda; practical paper on baconJ-curing) for which' he was thanked by the directors'.

Fatal AooiDßirrAT AsHBtrSTOV.—A fatal accident occurred to a child about five years old, eon of Mr Quill, of i thi Commercial Hotel," Ashburtion. The child was pTaying with a eon of Mr Cbokson, about the same age, in the hay loft above Mr Cookson's stable, when he fell through the trap-door dv to the concrete floor of the stable. When found he was moaning feebly, bat- quite insensible, and died three hours afterwards. An inquest was held yesterday at Mr QuilL's Hoteli before J. E. Treror, Esq 1 ., coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr Qt. M t Robinson was chosen foreman. The above facts having been.deposed to, and Dr. Steward, who attended the child, having stated that in hie opinion death was caused by concussion of the brain, the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence. '' ', ' ;

Thh A.VTVKS SHTTMjre, ->-The official settling for the Autumn Meeting took, place yesterday, afternoon at RadciiflVe Hotel. The following was the amount of the stakes paid by Mr Stead:— Mr H. Bedwood — Great Autumn Handicap, £399 ; GhamgagneStakeg, £258 8s"; Consolation Stakes, £38; total, £695. Mr W. C. Wflbb-r-jSt. sieger Stakes, £247. Mr J. W. Mallock—Easter Handicap, £151; Selling 3oce, [£85 10a ;'/£ofaL. £239 10s;' Mr Ebbert Ray — Flying' Btakes, £137 15s. Mr L.,Markeyr-rHandicap ;Steepleohaeß,'£l23 10s. Mr D;' O'Brien— Tree Handicap, £85 10e. Mr, J. Lunn— Second place in'the Autumn Handicap, £10; Hack Race, £10; total, £20. Total stakes paid, £1545 13e. The settling of the " pen■cillera by the way" abo took place, and passed pfF satisfactorily, though there were" a few 'who had not exchanged farewell greetings with some of their friends.

Meeting of- Paeissiokees at KalApoi. H-On Tuesday evening Mxßiapban met about lift?-six of the, members of the congregation lof the pariah church in the schoolroom. Dr. J ljudley occupied the chair. Mr Bisphan explained the object of the meeting, and askod i£ it was the wish of those present that he should take duty at the church. After a slight discussion, Mr Porter moved, Mr R, H. Mathews seconded—"'That*. In the opinion of those present, it is desirable to retain the leervices of the Eev. Mr-Biephan till the cure ie supplied or the Bishop' of the dioceae retnn)»irom England." The. chairman and Mr Porter, as two of the nominators, expressed their intention, ac soon *w possible, to nominate an eligible clergyman to the cure. The motion, was declared to be -carriedv Several present did not rote, bnt the opinion seemed to be a unanimous one that a clergyman ought to be appointed at ah early date to take permanent charge of the parish. A vote of thanks to the chairman terminated the proceedings. *•■■■ . •

" KaIAPOI WeBXBTAN StTIfDAY SCHOOL.— The anniversary aermons of this school wore preached on Sunday by the Bey, J. Arroita- c, who has-been appointed superintendent'of the circuit. During the afternoon b children's service was held. On Easter Monday the tea meeting- took place in the : schoolroom, at which there was a largo attendance. Tables were furnished by members of the congregation. A crowded publio meeting was subsequently held in the chapel. Mr J. Wood presided. Mr, J. Veysey, hon. iecretanyjrend;' the annual report ana statement of accounts, _whioh showed the attendance to be 195, •oholar* and twenty-seven teachers j the receipts £67, the expenditure £6% Iβ Bd,' a debt of £20 being, dnefor repsira and prize/.books, which it was expected the proceeds of this enniversary would cover. "The Beve. W. McGregor, W. "Cannell.-'H. Ellis, W. Morley, and J. Armitage delivered addressee. The choir contributed several, musical selections. At the close a vote of thanks to those who provided the tea, to the choir, the speakers, and, the chairman was carried, and the doxology baring been anng, the proceedings terminated. The amount received by collections and eale of tiokete connected -with the anniversary was about £27. ■

Ihcompbtencb at Ska.—The following extract from the "Auckland Herald," of the 18th, shows how unfit some masters of coasting vessels are to be entrusted with the lives of passengers. It is notorious that the nautical knowledge of some of the gentlemen who are addressed as "captain" is remarkably small, but such ignorance as this is extraordinary:—A correspondent calls attention to the fact that the majority of the coasters trading between this port and the Bay of Islands or East Cape very frequently proceed to eea without a compass, and those who possess them scarcely can*read the points. Aβ it very often happens that heavy fogs are encountered, and the masters are at their wit's ends, a compass is therefore necessary under such circumstances. An incident happened the other day; when a cutter, being 'caught in a fog, and hating passengers on board, the master scarcely knew where he was v It was suggested by a gentleman that the compass should be consulted, and when brought out the skipper eonld not read it, and the cutter was left entirely to the mercy of the wind and wave?. Our correspondent suggest* that the owners and insurance com-* pamee should insist upon all masters having • thorough knowledge of the compass, and be acquainted intimately with the coast. ' "

ThH MXNIfITBY AlH>. -XHB _ JLIU'WAYB. The " Northern f ~AMb6&e*'' Mentions a rumour, fpr which it is. hardly credible that there is any foundation, that Sir George Grey will A*k the sanction of the Legislature next session to sell the whole of the colonial rail- « ways. "Wβ give the rumour for, t what it is worth. Whether Sir George proposes to sell" out of the railway basinets, goodwill and all, wfrhare not heire. , *^" "

Wbstlasd'B Views of Separation.— The " Grey River Argus" says that the separation scheme, i 6 such a thing is in existence, •would not meet with the approval of the constituencies of that part of "the colony. The Counties Act no doubt requires amendment, and the Councils have not given complete satisfaction, but there is ample room for improvement, without reverting in any form to a system of government which was abolished with the consent of a large majority of the people of New Zealand.

Coal Pbospbctixs at Kaitangata.— The "Otago Times " states that the shaft being sunk at Kaitangata by Messrs Winter and Co. has now reached a depth of 280 ft. No less than sixteen seams of coal, varying in thickness from six feet to six inches, have been before jreajgbjng seam they are in search of, a farther distance of 50ft. will have to be sunk. Fifteen men are kept at work night and day, and a powerful engine is used to raise the earth and waler.'" " - ■ j - ' ™

Lady Clbbxb.— A writer in the "Otago Daily Times" observes: —The Telegraph Office is the only department of the public service in which ladies are regularly employed. There are a considerable number or lady clerks in the head office, and a number of operators both at headquarters and at some of the principal stations are of the fair sex. The Clearing Office in "Wellington is, we believe, entirely in the hands of the ladies, and the work is done with great accuracy and rapidity. Some of the ladies also are excellent operators. EraoPEAX T. China^uw. —The Moonlight correspondent of the " Wakatip Mail" writes :—There is such a strong feeling at present up here anent the Chinese getting the Moke Lake contract that the question is seriously entertained whether we should not be on the look out for an intelligent Chinaman to represent as at the next County Council election—always provided we can legally so do. If we should return a Chinaman and he get elected chairman he could do the office so much cheaper, and those who returned Europeans could, I 'think, have little, if any, reasonable objection.

The Case of thb Sotohlakd Rakghb. —Some contemporaries have taken upon themselves to justify the action of the Government in regard to.the Ranger Campbell, who was recently dismissed, and has since been reappointed to another district. The question' of hie dismissal without an opportunity of meeting hie accusers has been already discussed in these columns. But supposing he had proved himself ever so oulpable, it 'v clear that the late action of the Government is all the lees justifiable in proportion to the ranger's culpability. Having declared him a partial, and therefore an untrustworthy officer, they have reappointed him ranger for the Waikaia land district. How ■ will the friends of the Government excuse this step ?

Incxdkkts of Ministkbial Tbav£L.—lt will be remembered that when MinhteM were touring in this island some trifling hitch occurred oa, the southern eeofion o| thp railway, and bbpfof the official travellers wa# said to have been -tnuch -disturbed thereby. Mr Macandrew's diving- feat at Westporfc wUI also be freeirin our readers' minder, ..The fol. lowing further incidente of Ministerial travel are recorded by an Auckland contxtmporary, and may perhaps lead to the proper, fencing of the railways:—The unprotected-state of spme sections of the Auckland and Waikato Railway is often a source of great danger to passengers, and a serious loss to the settlers. On Tuesday last the special train which' was conveying Sir George -Grey and the Ministerial; party to Waikato, shortly after passing the Tattpiri railway station, ran over a -very large pig, which the. engine cut in two. The blood and fleeh were spattered all over the engine and carriages, and the train had to be stopped while the guard and engineer removed the obstruction from the line. A very perceptible bump was felt in all the carriages. On the return journey on Thursday, near the same station, a fine-looking 'horse experienced a very narrow escape. • _■

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18780425.2.11

Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY., Press, Volume XXIX, Issue 3978, 25 April 1878

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3,003

NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume XXIX, Issue 3978, 25 April 1878

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