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NEWS OF THE DAY.

Deaixage Board.—The usual fortnightly meeting of this Board will be held at the otFice, Hereford street, to-day, at 10.30 a.m.

Canterbury Lodge, No. 1048.-rA lodge of instruction will be held this evening at the St. Augustine Masonic Hall, at half-past seven.

Chbistchurch Musical Union. —This society will give their first concert on Thursday next/ when the oratorio "Sti Paul." will be produced.

Thb Dkainage Question. —The public meeting convened by hie Worship the Mayor, to consider a new scheme of drainage, will be held this evening in the* Oddfellows' Hall.

Sporting.—The following entry was accidentally omitted from those entered in the Champagne of 1878—Mr J. Boxborough'sJblk c, by l'raducer—Myrtle.

South Canterbubt Racjrs.—We remind owners of horses that all nominations and acceptances must be in the hands of the secretary, Mr R. Stansell, Timaru, before 8 o'clock this evening.

Oamaru Steeplechase. —It has been decided to reduce the stakes of the Waitaki County Cup from £60 to £50, and of the Steeplechase Club Handicap from £80 to £70.

Acclimatisation.—A number of goldfinches and linnets from Now Zealand'have been liberated in the vicinity of Randwick, New South Wales, for acclimatisation purposes.

Leeston Town Hall Co.—A special general meeting of shareholders, for the purpose of confirmirig the special resolution pasted at the last general meeting and electing auditors, will he held at the hall on Monday, April 30th, at 7.30 p.m.

Lyttelton Choib Pickic—The members of the choir of Holy Trinity Church, Lyttelton, held their annual picnic on Saturday last, proceeding to Governor's" Bay in the steam launch Lyttelton. All sorts of sports were indulged in, and a delightful day was spent, the weather being all that could be desired.

St. Paul's Presbytbriah Chttecji.—Mγ C. J. Hodge has been appointed organist and choir master of the St. Paul's Presbyterian Church. It may be mentioned that a new organ for this church, said to be a very superior instrument, is to be shipped in London about the end of the present month.

The Margabet Gaibbaith.—Messrs Shaw, Saville, and Co.'s ship Margaret Galbraith, which arrived at Lyttelton on Friday, is stated to have made the voyage in exactly the same time as the Opawa. She sailed five days after the Opawa, and there was the same difference of time on her arrival here. j

Settling Day.—The following stakes were paid over at Radcliffe's Hotel on Saturday last to tlie various winners at the recent Autumn Meeting: —r Mr Redwood, £735, (being Leger. £142; Great Autumn Handicap, £437; and Flying Stakes, £156); Mr Webb, Champagne Stakes, £288 ; Mr Delamam, Easter Handicap, £168; Mr R, Ray, Steeplechase, £137; Mr MalJock, Selling Race, £85; Mr A. W. Money, Consolation, £40; Mr Vallance, Hack Race, £10.

West Etreton. —On "Friday evening an entertainment was given at the vVest Eyreton school, at which there was a large attendance to welcome the new master, Mr Hamilton,, and Mrs Hamilton to the district. Musical selections were given by Mrs Diion, Misses Higgins (2), Horrell (2), E. Parnham, and Bowie. Readings were given by the Rev Mr Hnmilton, of Cust, and Mr M. Dixon gave an interesting account of hie journey across America. The usual votes of thanks concluded a very pleasant evening. '

St John's Chuech, Lebstow.—At tne annual Easter meeting on Thursday the Bey. W. Harper occupied the chair. It was'resolved that the parish should undertake the responsibility of their portion of the debt upon the parsonage, Southbridge. Mr C. Dudley was elected churchwarden, and was requested to ascertain the position of Leeston as to the the glebe land, Southbridge. It was determined that the amount of guarantee to the stipend fund be for the present year £100. Votes of thanks to the,chairman and butgoing churchwarden, Mr Hill, terminated the proceedings.

Ceicket —Lyttelton v Head op the Bay.—The return match between these clubs was played on the ground at the Head of the Bay on Saturday last. The main feature of the match was the bowling on both aides, which was altogether too good for the batsmen. Both sides may also be congratulated :on the fielding, very few chances being missed. The wicket was by no means a good one, the grass being so long that, though admirably suited for bullocks, it was decidedlyunfavorable to cricket. We hear, however, that steps are going to be taken to have a better wicket neit year, and as the ground ie level and there is a good sward this cart be accomplished with little difficnlty. Lyttelton won the match by 27 runs, making 30, Jn the first and 37 in i the second innings, ana the Head of the Bay made 17 and 23 respectively. Watte and Makeig were the Lyttelton bowlers, the brothers Beeves trundling "for the Head of the Bay. W. H. Eyes was captain of the Lyttelton and £. Barnard of the Head of the Bay team, and both may be congratulated on the skill they showed in placing their fields. Mr John Gebbie worked hard all day, net only playing for Lyttelton, but also spending the whole of his spare time in acting as umpire. - A pleasant day was spent.

Patmkst.of MK*BKB».-Th<' Me/bourn* Leader stotee that Tarioussigns in tin- pohtieal honson of Victors portend an eerly termination of the system of payment of* member* It commenced on the 25th of April 18"! * and[after a six yean.' experience, politician* on both sides of tho House art) testifvintr »,» ite utter fiulure. Even Sir C. Q. Duffy wlw was in reality the Parliamentary sponsor at tho Reimbursement of Members Act freoTv admits that the measure which he took *f> much trouble, to initiate has by. no mean'sanswered his expectations. Thr Country Joprnat,.—We have received the second issue of this publication 11 is a decided improvement on the first, both i» general .arrangement and in niivtfe-r. TL,original contributions are numerous, and for the most part well written. Tt also- poswesaV* nion , of a t-oloniul interest, having papers from Taranaki, Nelson, and Auckland. It in to b,* hoped that these will be continued, antl tluifc Wellington and Otsigo may be rejircst'ntecl as •well in the futuro number?.' Enmv tliu number of advertisements, we should* say fchnt as a monetary speculation, the- Country Journal is a success, and wo are informed that already the circulation is largo autfi increasing. Colombo Road District Sciioor,. The annual distribution of prizes was niule to-tlnj scholars of this school on Friday afternoon lust. The presentations, in the boys' school were nude by Mr Allison. The chairman of the committee. Tho girls' prizes* worn proPCUted by Mrs .Allison; tho R.-vs. H. R. Cocks and J. S. Snuilley, with Messrs W. G. Hall, J. Whitelaw, suid E. Jones, mombev* of commitUv, assisted. In making the presentations it wiia explained that the priy.i? list did not in all tsises shew the usuul position of the childrtn in each clhss, tint committee having tukeu age into consideration in making the awnrde. They had accordingly added a pcr-centapc of marks to those gnineit by the younger children, the committee being of opinion that children who were considerably younger than the best scholars in each class, and who Tievertheless succeeded in getting near the head of it, were the most; deserving. The therefore became prizes for ' progress as well us prizes for plitee. During the afU'rnoon several pieces were very nicely sung by. the..children,, and. sever:) I members of the committee made addresses fc« the children, who mustered in great strength for the occasion. At the' conclusion tin* female pupil tcaehors presented Mrs Bowniakcr, the head mistress, with a testimonial in token of their appreciation of- her efforts to advance their studies. 7 . ...

Cebtificatku TKAcnKRe , Association-. - A very largo number o£ teaehora assembled o»* Saturday last in the Durham etrqet. schoolroom, to consider what course teachers should take previous to the introduction of a general system of education for New Zealand. Mr C\ Howard, principal of the Nornuil School, was also in attendance. The Rev. J. Cunimuig, President of the Association, ; ppienod th« meeting by stating the objects the Association had..in view in wiling theni together, and requested any gentleman to speak oh the subject. After a long discussion,: it was agreed, on the motion of Mr J. Cumberwoith—"That a general conference of teachers \m held on May 12th, when the question of education shall be fully discussed in all its bearings." A committee of thirteen members, consisting of the officers of the jJL?sociatioit, together with Meßsrs Howard, l Bishop, Baldwin, Edge, Mayo, Fojd, Meredith, and Mcwdameß Bowmaker, Hill, and Miss Perry wan appointed te .make all preliminary arrangements for holding the conference j and it was also decided that tlit* members of the House of BepTPßsontatiTee and the heads of denominations Sbe roqueeted to attend and take part in a general moeting to be held in the afternoon of tlio.cbnfenenc*. Afc the close of the meeting. the members of the committee met, when Mr Howard wne chosen chairman and Mr Mill secretary. If; was arranged thai Uwjhere from the.other , educational centres and counties of JNe> Zealand be invited either to attend the conference or send any resolutions which they would like to bo brought before the conference. Ajiotner committee meeting will fake place next''Saturday- at noon, when all the members am requested to be in attendance

The Baknkrman ThhTimokiai.. — The testimonial got up for Bannerman, in recognition of liis memorable play'in jfclie first qonteefc between the All -England nrift All Austreln*. cricketers, was presented to sence of about 500 spectators, by Mr"*Wbiteman, M.L.A. It consistad of £00. Bannerman s!iid he was very thankful to the gentle- " men who had been so kind ac to present him with this token of their appreciation of ln> play. The two teams and a number of friend*then met in the luncheon /tent, and dronlr each others' healths, Mr Gregory, captain of the Australian team, commented :on the facfc that not a single dispute bad occurred frooi first to last in those inatch<#. The Hon William Wilson, M.L.C., proposed the health o£ Mr John Con way, .who had -had the management of the mnteh, and complimented him ow the satisfactory mariner :m which all the arrangements had been carried out. In allusion to Mr Conway's long connection with cricket, Mr Wilson called attention to the ablo ecrvicee that he rendered, as a batsman and bowler, in the matcboe played ,with tfoe first; two English elevens that came to the ec-lonies?. MrConway, in reply, euid that lie thbuglift plans would shortly be entered into for tha visit of a representative team from Australia to England.

AseAUi/rnJG as Editor.—A fracas occurred in Hardy street on Saturday nigTifc between Mr F. R. Rives and MrHV Moor, the editor of the Nelson J)aily Times, Uus latter receiving st'voro punishment during the encounter. The cause of the row was certain remarks which occurred in a letter signed " Autolycus " in the Times of: thafc day, wherein pointed reference was .made lα. other individuals than the ■principal f ,objeckof the attack. By the position lo has recently occupied in the Bankruptcy Court, Mrßives* says the Mail, has rendered himself a fair-

object for newspaper -comment, and it Iβ nofc likely that any remarks made: about him would be regarded by the public as too caustic or severe, but the writer of the letter in question went beyond thie altogether, and invaded' the privacy of individuals, to drag whom before the public, even by amende, was not only unjustifiable but most reprehensible. In a subsequent numbor"of. the Time*, Mr Moor writes: —" I urn constrained to admit that the inforence that hae ; bee*» drawn, although erroneous, ie a natural one. Such being the c:»ee, I have no hesitation in

expressing my regret tltat any remarks of mine should have caused the slightest annoyanco in a quarter at which they were nofc aimed, and as there -vyns no intention on my part to insult or give pain, I \ most wiUingly offer the amplest apology to rfny whom 1 hat* unwittingly offended." ■. . ."

A "Canny" Scot.—The prosecutor in a. case in the Sydney Police' Court, where, two women were charged with stealing from the person, was a seaman by profession, .who hadL been some two years a g6ld miner, and wbo, judging from Jus speech, had evidently come originally from the "land of brown heath ami shaggy wood." His examination and evidence caused a good deal of amusement. ThS money stolen from him was contained in what prosecutor called a. " puree," but it was a poucPiof such dimensions that the Judge (wneh ifc was produced in Court), looked; and said that it seemed to him more like * lady's reticule. Judge— 7 "How came it tliafe you carried about with you such a large purse ?" Prosecutor ~" Jest .because I wauil aye be sure that I could ne'er fill't." Judg* to prosecutor (who had expressed bis joy afc having recovered the pouch,,.which: he- evidently looked upon oe an old friend) — "Where did you gefc the puree?" Prosectrto*- —" I bocht it in Princee street, E'mbro , ." Being cross -examined by tfce two women, prosecutor gave them $6ine liard Hts, of whit'?* the following are specimens, after the proverbial style of Poor Richnrd, or Martii* Tupper: —"Ye're better luking tnan ye're vvcel doing" (to one of the women); afad U» another, "I met you.mair by ill luck than by quid guidance*" He attributed.his mieforfcune in some measure to hie bavirig.pßrtaken " o' that teetotaller's drink—'havf-en-

jhawf. , '.••• He confessed that bin cherished 'pouch liad been in jeopardy once before, a«'«l only recently when he wad in Auckland;. Uew Zealand, when £17 were rtolea from him.

Rev. Charles Clabk* —Advices have been received from Canada reporting the JRer. •Charles Clark's lecturing tour as having been ,cry successful. ' Randwick Arrcaur Race?.—The settling over the late race meeting passed off satisfactorily The amount paid away in stakes was £7600. Mr K. K. Cox and Mr W. S. Hill were the largest winners.

EvAVGELrenc. —Intelligence has been received in Victoria that the Rev. Mr J«omerville, of Glasgow, who has become so eminent in the great work of revival aud evangelLsafion. is about to visit, the colony. His son, it is said, will accompany him.

Mc J. Reid Mackenzie.—We notice by the Dunedin papers that Mr John Eeia Mackenzie is dangerously ill. On Monday night he had an attack of apoplexy, and afterwards he was suffering from paralysis.

The StmrETOE-GFEXERAi.—A facetious applicant at the Hokitika Waste Land Board, commenting on the Surveyor-General's predilection for extracting shillings from the obstreperous public, remarked that the name of the oiiicial must surely be Bob Thomson. • Stack Fibes.—The- Waitangi Tribune reports that a fire broke out in Mr Stewart's stacks at the Waiho last Wednesday night, and consumed thirty-seven bags of wheat out of eixty-two, which he had saved for seed. On tlie" same night some of Mr Ennis's wheat wae burnt. The origin of the fires is unknown.

JJKATir op a Pbospectob.—The intelli- „ nee of the death, at Toorak, of one of the tsiVriest prospectors of Pleasant Creek, Mr Isaac Xewton, hae been the cause of a universal feeling of sorrow there. On the various claims flags were hoisted half-mast, and many shop* were closed. The deceased was the first resident of Stawell to prove the permanency of the deep reefs, and was highly respected by all claaees.

A Third BiiO2nu2». —-There will soon be " six Riclunonds in the field," and the feats of the original Harry will become as common as wheeling a barrow. We notice in the Sydney papers that a tight rope performer, styling himself the "Canadian Blondin," is giving entertainments similar to those of Blondin No 1, balancing on chairs, walking blindfold, and so forth.

CoxsTiTCTioyAL Rbfobm.—Speaking at Baimsdale, Sir C. Gavan Duffy hinted in somewhat obscure language at a proposal he had in reserve for a lvfonn of the "Victorian Constitution. He is reported to have said: — " There luid been many methods spoken of for bringing the two Houses in harmony with each other, but he had an opinion upon the question which he should make known at some future day. One of the greatest men living in the present day,.Thomas Carlyle, had said, aud very wisely too, ' If you are going to do anything, don't say much about it beforehand.' He should therefore not speak of his plan now, but when he ehonld be called upon to makes his views known, he hoped to do so to some purpose/ ; -

Aquatic—The projected match between Jackson, the Greyjnoufch rower, and Hearn, of "Wellington, has fallen through, the firstmentioned having declined to come up to scratch. The Argitt states that Jackson, having intimated his willingness to pull .a match, Messrs James Jones and William Splaine nominated Hcarn, and at once communicated with him. Hearn replied that he woidd pull Jackson or any man in Greyxnouth for from £50 to £250 a side. Jackson, however, having now drawn back, alleging as the reason some misunderstanding with his backers, Hearn "tehjgraphed lately that he is prepared to pull any man in- Greymbuth for £100. It is quite on the cards that this challenge may be taken up by another of the iocal cracks.

Colonial Locomotives.—A .-locomotive lias arrived at Greymouth by the Wanganui, from the Bluff, for the use of the contractors for the harbor improvements. It is said to have done good work' in drawing ballast on the Invereargill line, but there is some doHbt as to whether the wheels are suited to the gunge there. The Argue satirically says :-— " It is understood that the ' Possum ' at pre«ent doing duty will shortly be purchased by one of the leading milliners, who will have it transformed into a stationary engine for the purpose of driving a sewing-machine— i.e., of course, should the power, after the necessary repairs have been effected, be found sufficient."

Escort Waxtbd.—We learn from Reefton that considerable difficulty is experienced in the transmission of gold from there to Greymouth, owing to there being no provision made for an escort between the two towns. The last lot of gold forwarded by the Golden Fleece Company had to be kept on hand for several days on this account. The police are not authorised to convey the parcels, neither are they allowed to accompany the coach, though an offer has been made to pay all expenses if a weekly or fortnightly escort was arranged for. The expense, says the West Coast Timj't, -would be very light, and as the Banks in Reef ton and one or two companies are prepared to disburse it, the police authorities might surely arrange that one or two of the force could be spared for the trip, which would only be a matter of two days.

Tolls on tiie West Coast Road.—At a recent meeting of the Westland County Council Mr Beale moved, " That the report of the select committee re the scale of tolls to be levied at the various toll-gates of the county be adopted." The only alteration made by the committee was to reduce the scale for Teliieles drawn by one horse passing through the Christchureh road toll-gate, from 4s to 2s. Mr Hirter seconded pro forma. He did not agree with the motion, and considered that the charge for every sheep should be 6d, instead of 3d per head. He would move an amendment to that effect. It was only fair to make the Christchurch squatters pay a little extra. Mr M'Oafim seconded pro forma. After a slight discussion the resolution was agreed to.

Huxgerford's Bridge.—What is known as Hungerford'e bridge over the Arahura on the Christehurch and Hokitika ro.td, has broken down. The settlers in the neighbourhood are anxious for the County Council either to remove what remains of "the useless Btructure or build a new bridge. Unless something be done speedily, much of the material will liave to be fished out of the rivor. The bridge was a handsome and costly structure, but built of very perishable timber, and when it decayed the work could not well be repaired in piecemeal. It was considered one of the fiuest suspension bridges on the West Coast; but its weakness was its want of durability. The Christchureh coaches will now have to ford the river as of old, or proceed by the loop-line towards Hokitika.

Cockt Practice.— A rather unusual point recurred at the Supreme Court, Wellington, in the case Hodder v Wardell. Counsel for plaintiff called defendant as a witness, and defendant's counsel had in consequence no evidence to call. Therefore, when the plaintiff's case closed the question arose as to whose province it was to address the jury first. The rule states " When all the evidence on both sides is closed, the party who had not the right to begin shall address the jury generally •on the case, and after him the party who had the right to begin, shall have the reply." No provided for what should be done when they..* sno evidence for the defence. Mr AIL« that MY Travers must sum np his case, leaving him the right of reply to the whole. The Judge held that the party on whom the burden of proof lay should have the right of reply.

Paixffl Accidext. —An accident of a very painful character in relation to a printer's feelings and his probable language has been experienced by the Wellington Argut. Our contemporary had to appear on a recentafternoon with the back page of his Saturday's supplement as the first page of the paper, the print being of size that he who ** runs," professionally or otherwise, may easily Jead it. The explanation of this unusual circumstance is thus given : —" We have to apologise to advertisers and to our readers generally for the appearance of our front page to-day. Just as the formes were going to press this afternoon a stupid boy managed *Q thrust his foot through the front page, thereby converting the contents info a hopeless mass of pie. Printers will understand tae extent of the misfortune and sympathise *ith. us, while we hope our constituents in general will accept our excuses."

Actob v. M« v a ciry — 4,-fr-, flu. Wellington Resident MagutorieV i Conrt on Tiwdsy, Mr W. BT. Mctealf, an actor, sued Mr Sam Howard, the leeeee of the Theatre Royal, for £20. According to the plaintiff's statement, Mr Howard got him to remain at the Theatre bj promising that he should hare a "benefit." The benefit, however, was put off for so long a tune that it would have been useless for plaintiff to tate it. Plaintiff calculated that he had lost £20 by the transaction, and therefore he sought to recover that amount from Mr Howard. Defendant's evidence was to the effect that he had neyer definitely promised tliat plaintiff should hare a beuefit. After hearing the evidence on both sides, Mr Crawford gave judgment for defendant, on the ground that when piaintiff was engaged by him no contract was made for a benefit in Mr Metcalf 's favor. Action for Daiiaoes.—The case Irvine v Brooke, an action to recover £5000 damages for breach of partnership agreement as architects and engineers,' came to a rather unexpected conclusion in the Supreme Court-, Wellington. At the close of the plaintiff's case the jury intimated that they did not consider it necessary to bear any evidence for the defence, and that they had made up their minds as to their verdict. The Pott reports that some discussion ensued a≤ to whether the Court could accept a verdict at that stage of the proceedings, aud it was agreed that the case should be proceeded with. MrTravers then said he would call no evidence fof the defence, but would content himself with addressing the-jury. He did so, and his Honor summed up. The jury having retired for a few minutes returned a verdict for the defendant. Mklaxchoj/e Gcx Acciukst. —The Advocate furnishes the following particulars, of the melancholy accident which occurred on Sunday hist, when Mr Randolph, of Karere, near Palmerston, of the firm of Randolph and Walter, farmers, was -accidentally shot dead by his partner, Mr Walker. It appears that the partners hud proceeded to the bush to look out some totara trees for splitting purposes, Randolph going first and carrying a billhook, which ho used for cuffing supplejacks. Walker followed with a iVnvlingpiece. Whilst in this position the fowlingpiece suddenly went off, the charge entering at the back of Randolph's head, and breaking his jaw. Walker called to him, bnt receiving no answer, posted to town for medical assistance. Several* neighbors were on the spot soon ufter the accident occurred, but found that the unfortunate man had ceased to exist.

The Crrii, Skbvice Lrxon.—ln connection with this subject, the Wellington Argus mentions that the new regidatioiis have led to the development of an unsuspected amount of talent in the culinary line, aud that great ■ingenuity has been displayed in improvising 'cooking utensils. One well-known gentleman ■has qxute a little canteen, comprising all imiplenwnte from ft gridiron to a kettle, and in ithe neighborhood of his office a strong flavor of sausages prevails daily, and the cup that cheers but not inebriates Is usually obtainable there. Another gentleman finds the tongs very handy for cooking red herrings. Infact^ , 'appetising odours now: so sweeten the atmosphere of the buildings that almost every one ifinds it absolutely necessary to devote far more" tune than usual to ' the business of lunch. ; \ \ <<

AXOTJIKB'''RCSH TO THE TeRE'MAKAU.— A new rush has taken place at the Tcremakau, of which great expectations are entertained. It commenced on Monday morning on a continuation of Ha yes' Terrace, Greenstone road, situate about 200 yards on Hie Greenstone side of Murphy's house, and a few hundred yards from the blue blitff on the road. The claims are pegged off on the table land of the terrace, "and fully 100 claims have been marked off. Melican and party, the prospectors, discovered tliat the ground was payable, they having obtained from seventeen" dishes an average ;of 3gra. to the dish, and from some dishes they, obtained as much as ldwt. They kept the* mutter quiet until the friends they had commiun'cated with had arrived. During the night parties commenced marking off claims, and it is estimated that there were 400 men at least on the ground on Monday morning. A number of. persons have ]>egged off business sites along the road, and the greatest hopes are entertained that the rush will be an extensive one.

Deaths 6v Old Colonists. —Private letters received by the mail report that Mr Raymond, who some years ago occupied the position of manager o£ the Wellington branch of the Union Bank, died in London on the 4th February. The deceased will be remembered by many old colonists.—The death of Mr Wm. Craighead, of the Taita, Lower Hutt, Occurred on Saturday week. He was engaged in some outdoor occupation when he suddenly fainted, but on restoratives being applied he rallied sufficiently to allow of his walking into his house; however, he then lay down and died. Deceased was well-known in the Wellington province as an old colonist of some thirty-six years standing, having arrived in the Lord William Bentinck in 1841.—Paul Inch, who arrived in Taranaki with Mr Chilman in the William Bryan in 1841, died last week. At the engagement at Waireka, Inch received a flesh wound in tlie chest. The poor old man lias been failing in health for some time. On Friday morning, 6th instant, he was found near to the Native office, having lain out in the wet all night, and this exposure resulted in his death.

The Coxference of Wakdexs.—The Goldfield Wardens constituting the conference at Wellington are now at their work iv earnest. Some of the proposals to be submitted by one of them, Mr Charles Broad, are thus indicated by the Wcstport Time* —"Reduction of the fee for miners' rights to one shilling per annum, every miners' right, wherever issued, to be valid throughout the colony, for mining purposes, but the electoral qualification now incident to the possession of a miner's right to be abolished, under the consideration that any miner desiring to enjoy the privilege of the franchise can do so by registration as the occupier of the hut he lives in. The gold duty to be maintained at the present rate, as being a duty only chargeable in proportion to a miner's earnings ; one set of goldfield regulations to be adopted for the whole colony, and such regulations to comprise a more speedy method of dealing with mining and agricultural leases. Power being vested in the wardens to give instant decisions on such applications, without reference to other and oftentimes obstructing authorities."

Items.—The tender of Mr John Robinson, of the Upper Hntt, for the Mungaroa permanent way contract, has been accepted. The price is £2663 15s.—A nice Maori lad lives near Masterton. He is not above nine years olfl. His weight is Bst 121b, and his measure round the chest 35 inches.—A lady on board the Hinemoa, while on her way to her husband at Auckland, gave birth to twins, stillborn. —Inspector Thompson, A.C., has, it is said, been appointed to the charge of the Taranaki and Patea police district.—The immigrants have found speedy employment in Wellington. Every domestic servant who arrived by that ship has been engaged.—The branch line of railway between Mosgiel and Outram will probably be opened for traffic in about two months and a half.— A meeting has been held at Waitara for the purpose of forming a company to purchase a steamer to trade between that port and the Manukau.—The report that Mr E. ff. Ward has resigned the appointment of Registrar of the Supreme Court, Dunedin, is contradicted. —The plaut of a paper to be called the Free Press has been forwarded from Napier to Wairoa, where it is to be published.

! TnE O'Keefes.— The New Zealand Herald lately published a paragraph to the effect that a gentleman in India had recently died intestate, leaving no immediate heirs, and whose estate was estimated to be worth £5,000,000. It was hinted that such a prize should be looked after bvthe large family of O'Keefes. In reply to "that paragraph the Herald has received the following letter. —" Opotik, April9th, 1877.—T0 the Editor of the Herald Ser I wish to Corrert a error in your Tauble jurnul, th'e name of O'Keeffe spelt h wrong that Gentleman that left the estate in Indie I am one of hie heirs, I sent my Clame severel weeks ago, and a nother in* Stephen Green Dublin. Are you aware thatbravename of O'Keeffe Fought side by side with Bryin Boiroinmbe at Cluaintarf For his County an Religen like Many other brave men Youe truly, M. 31. O'Kbefe."

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NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume XXVII, Issue 3677, 23 April 1877

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