Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

CHRISTCHURCH.

The formal declaration by Mr E. B. Bishop "the returning officer, of the election of Mr -F Hobbs as* Mayor of Christchurch for 1875 6. took place at noon yesterday, at the City Council Chambers. The proceedings were purely formal, there being no other candidate, but Mr Bishop expressed his pleasure at finding that the citizens had ratified the choice of the City Council by electing Mr Hobbs again to the worthy position of Mayor. THB MAYOR'S LUNCHEON. The official luncheon of his Worship the Mayor took place at 1.30 p.m., at Warner's Hotel, in the new billiard room attached to * -the hotel, which is admirably adapted for a gathering of the kind. The guests included the representative of the Colonial Government (Hon B. Richardson), his Honor the Superintendent and Executive, his Honor the Judge, the exMayors of Christchurch and members of the City Council, and generally persons holding official positions, either in the province or Mr Warner's catering was thoroughly good, a really excellent spread being proTided, while the wines were first class, and altogether it waa such as would have done credit to any purveyor in the city. The tables were prettily decorated with cut : -flowers, &c, and everthing that was needful for the comfort of the guests was done by Mr Warner. His Worship the Mayor occupied the chair, supported on the right by his Honor the Superintendent, Hon S. Richardson (Minister lor Public Works), Sir Cracroft Wilson, C.8., X.5.1., and on the left by his Honor Mr Justice Johnßton, Mr E. C. J. Stevens, Mr J. L. Coster. Hon J. T. Peacock, Mr W. S. Moorhouse, &c, kc. Mr John Ollivier discharged the duties of croupier, and it is needless to say in a moßt efficient manner. About fifty gentlemen sat down, and after ■justice had been done to the spread, His Worship the Mayor gave the usual -loyaltoasts, which were most enthusiastically drank. -" His Worship then proposed " His Excellency the Governor," remarking that he had won the respect and esteem of all classes of her Majesty's subjects during his lat3 visit. All would agree with him that his Excellency ''had in the highest sense of the word rendered himself popular with those of her Majesty's subjects resident here. The toast was drunk with musical honors. His Worship then rose to propose •' The •Government of the Colony," coupled with the name of the Hon E. Richardson. '[Cheers.] Hon C. C. Bowen would have "been present that day had he not been Obliged to be absent at Eyreton. It was a •great credit to Canterbury that she had two of her .residents filling bo important posts as the Minister for Public Works and Minister of-Justice, and not only so, but with so much credit to themselves and to the colony £Gheers.j So long as Canterbury produced men of such calibre as this she would have no reason to be afraid of being able to take high rank amongst her sister provinces. The toast was drank amid lond cheers. - Hon E. Richardson, in returning thanks, feaid he was proud to see that the toast was received with much enthusiasm. He regretted that the Hon C. C. Bowen was absent, and he felt certain that Mr Bowen regretted it as such as he did. He thought that in re-electing their present chairman as Mayor of Christchurch the citizens had done well,;as he had during his past year of office d,one excellent work. [Cheers. \ He thanked them very kindly for the manner in which the' toast had been drank. [Cheers. J UMS John Ollivier rose to propose the next toast, that of "His Honor the Superin-

tehdent'of Canterbury." They were met there that day for a twofold object, one to welcome the inauguration of the ntw reign of his Worship the Mayor of Christchurch, and the other to assist et amournfnlceremony, viz, the probable obsequies of his Honor the Superintendent, f Laughter,] The time had come, and the latter was doomed to the tomb of the Capulets never to rise again in Tub present capacity. But whatever capacity Mr •Rolteston might occupy, in whatever position he was found, he felt sure that it would be for the honor and credit of the province of Canterbury, and for the raising higher in the scale. [Cheers! The Superintendent had done well in the past; his efforts.had been always directed towarJs advancing the interests of the province, and though this might be the last occasion upon which he appeared before them in his present character, they would all agree that his Honor had done his duty ably and well in:the past. [Cheers.] He now asked them tadrinkthe health of the Superintendent of Canterbury. [Cheers.] The toast was drank amid loud cheers. His Honor the Superintendent, who was loudly cheered, said that he had been somewhat astonished at the remarks of the last Bpeaker at the commencement of his speech. He was reading a paper read before the Anthropological Society, in which it was stated that as language was the especial gift of man, so brains should increase in size according to Ihe fluency of language. Ii this were so his friend Mr Ollivier must b€ something like those caricatures in which it was net necessary to depict any bo**y, owing to the head sufficing for both. As regarded his-decease he might say that he was not to. accept that. --[Cheers] Looking hack as he did for eight years, b« „ •*-*•*•» teceived from the hands of thepeopk *__9hriJßichnrch'. marks' of confidence iSttii wsTOc^ ! of -which he Bhould.alwajs retain th* JvarnjQjtfeelings of gratitude; and though he sa# -that the promises which* had beer hdd out to the people had dazzled them witl

a mirage, wlfeli veiled the rising son he had near him (Hon E. Richardson), he was not one after what he bal received at tbe hands of the people to stand in the way if the people accepted the propositions of the Government. [Cheers.] By what had taken place that day, whoever might be elected, he saw that the people had accepted the scheme of the Government, and this being so he would not be one to stand in the way, but rather assist to carry out tbe work for the interest of the colony. [Cheers] His Honor the Superintendent then rose to propose tha health of " His Worship the Mayor." He thought the citizens of Christchurch had done wisely to elect a gentleman as their Mayor who had during the past year done the duty fearlessly and well. [Cheers. | He was glad to find that the Act giving power to the ratepayers to elect their Mayor had been brought into action here, and he congratulated hiß Worship upon having again been the chosen of his fellow citizens. [Cheers.] The toast was drank with applause. His Worship the MayoT, who was warmly received on rising, said that he thanked them most heartily for the way in which the toast had been drunk. During the past year he had endeavored to do his duty, and in doing so he had been ably assisted by the Council, a Council which he thought he might say was equal to anyone in the colony. [Cheers. | He regretted that the number of invitations had been limited, but had he invited all his personal friends there was not a room in Christchurch large enough to hold them. [Cheers.] He had therefore been obliged to confine it to ex-May ore, members of City Council, and gentlemen occupying official positions in the province. [Cheers.] He begged again to thank them for the warm manner in which the toast had been drank. [Cheers.] Mr J. P. Jameson proposed " The health of his Honor Judge Johnston, coupled with that of the Bar." His Honor had only recently come amongst them, but he felt sure he would receive at the hands of the residents of Canterbury a warm and generous welcome. The toast was drank amid loud cheers. His Honor, Mr Justice Johnston, who on rising was received with loud cheers, said that he begged to thank them for the kindly manner in which the toast had been drank. He was but a recent resident amongst them, but he was not a new chum in the politics of the country, and therefore he wished to say that it augured well for the future of the colony that the law makers and law administrators were thoroughly in accord with each other. [Cheers.] He felt that judges were prevented, or rather should abstain from taking, as it were, any opportunity of appealing to the opinions of the people. It had been his privilege to be associated with the Judges of New Zealand, more especially with that high-minded and distinguished gentleman who had previously occupied the seat of Judge of this district. (Cheers.) He also was glad to notice amongst those present an old friend, one whom he had known in England on the Northern circuit— he alluded to his friend Mr Moorhouse. (Cheers.) He thanked them very heartily for the way in which the toast had been drank, and more especially for the kindly expression of opinion towards himself. [Cheers.l Sir Cracroft Wilson briefly proposed the " Araiy and navy, coupled with the name of Lieut-Colonel Packe." The toast was drank amid cheers. Lieut-Colonel Packe briefly responded. Mr Justice Johnston rose to propose the next toast, that of " The Corporation." In doing so, his Honor said that these convivial gatherings, so far from being what was colloquially called " bunkum," were conducive to the very best interests of the people. On occasions like this politics were not forbidden— that is politics in the highest sense of the word for the benefit of the whole of the country. [Cheers.] At home hospitality was a characteristic of the corporation, and it had not deteriorated here. Municipal institutions to his mind in the highest degree carried out the idea of liberty so inherent in the minds of Englishmen. He was glad to have the opportunity of proposing the health of the corporation, a corporation which his Worship the Mayor, who had that day risen like a Phoenix from his ashes, informed him was second to none in New Zealand. [Cheers.] He gave them the Corporation of Christchurch. The toast was drank amid loud cheers. Cr Ick briefly responded to the toast. Mr Wm. Wilson, in a highly eulogistic speech, proposed "The Visitors," coupled with the name of Mr Wm. Sefton Mcerhouse, The toaßt was drank amid loud plaudits. Mr Moorhouse, who was loudly cheered on rising, said he was very much pleased with the reception given to him on this day. He had been associated with the province in its struggle into its present position. He could not be regarded as a stranger; every tree spoke to him ; every turn reminded him of the past. If he was a visitor, he was so as a nobleman coming down to visit his estate. [Cheers.] He was much pleased to hear a learned judge, whose eloquence he (Mr Moorhouse) as a boy had listened to with rapt attention on the Northern circuit, refer to their being associated together on that circuit where some of the brightest intellects in England were congregated. This would be to him one of the most interesting reminiscences of his visit to Canterbury which he could look to. Year after year, when he came to Canterbury, he saw the advance made by it, year after year he saw its institutions expanding and growing in usefulness, and he could not but think that, come what may, the people of Canterbury, his brethren, would return him to Parliament. [Cheers.] He thanked them heartily for the way in which the toast had been drank. [Cheers] Mr Moorhouse proposed the toast of " The Ex-Mayors," coupled with the name of Mi W. Wilson. Mr W. Wilson responded in a brief speech, Mr Ollivier proposed " The Officers of the Corporation," paying a tribute of respect tc the late Mr Gordon, whose memory he said would long live in the recollection of the people of Chtistchurch. The speaker, aftei referrine to the various officers in terms oi

eulogium, coupled the toast with the name of Dr Foster. The toast was drank amid loud applause. Dr Foster briefly responded, expressing the conviction that municipal institutions were expanding. His Worship the Mayor proposed the "Press of Canterbury," speaking in eulogistic terms of the way in which during his term of office he had been treated by the editors of the papers. His Worship also paid a compliment to the reporters of the locarpapers, and expressed his opinion that the press of Canterbury was equal to that of any part of the colonies. He would couple the toast with the name of Mr Veel, the editor of the PRESS. Mr Veel responded in an appropriate speech. Mr Moorhouse said that he had made a discovery, which was that this was his Worship's birthday. He had therefore to propose his health, with a hope that he would live for thirty-four years more. [Cheers.] The toast was drank amid loud cheers. His Worship responded in appropriate terms. He had always had a wish to try to render some service to his fellows. He had taken as his motto that it was a man's duty to do all he could to advance the interests of his fellows, and had endeavored to cany this out. [Cheers.] . Sir Cracroft Wilson then proposed the health of "Mr Superintendent Harris," of the fire brigade, speaking in the highest terms of his services. The toast was drank amid loud applause. Mr Superintendent Harris responded. He had come to the front, in his present position from a feeling that it was his duty to do all he could for his fellow citizens. fGheers.J , If it were not that he was surrounded by an able band of men, ho felt that he could not do his duty as well as he had. In fact from ■many difficulties in his way he should.like to be relieved from the position he held. i ["No, no."] :He thanked them heartily for \ the way in which hia health had been : drunk. ' '"" " ' Mr Ollivier proposed in a humorous speech " The ladies," coupled with the name of Mr E. B. Biahop.

' Mr E. B. Bishop responded in appropriate terms.His Worship the Mayor proposed the vicechairman, *' Mr John Ollivier," who, he remarked, filled a position in Christchurch which was unattainable by any one but him. [Cheers.] If any thing was wanted for the city, for any charitable matters, there was their friend Mr John Ollivier. [Cheers.] His Worship then passed a high eulogium on the services rendered by their late departed friend, Mr George Gordon, and the services rendered by him to the snorts committee. Mr Ollivier, finding that the sports were likely to collapse, came to the fore, and the result was that the sports were a greater success than they had ever been before. [Cheers.] In one day Mr Ollivier had collected over £100, and this waa only one of tbe services which Mr Ollivier had rendered to the public of Christchurch. He trusted that for many years Mr Ollivier would live amongst them, to promote everything which had for its object the wellbeing and interest of the mass of the people. | Loud cheers.] The toast was drank with loud cheers, and musical honors. Mr Ollivier responded, in a very humorous speech, in the course of which he expressed his wish to be to see Canterbury take the lead in the matter of material prosperity amongst the provinces. Mr Ollivier proposed the " Health of Mr Stevens," which was drank amid loud cheers. Mr Stevens responded, in suitable terms. Several other toasts were proposed, including the "Legislative Council," coupled with the name of the Hon J. T. Peacock, who responded, expressing his strong conviction that if the constitution of the Upper House was changed to an elective one the colony would rue it. The company then separated, having enjoyed a very pleasant afternoon.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18751218.2.13.1

Bibliographic details

CHRISTCHURCH., Press, Volume XXIV, Issue 3214, 18 December 1875

Word Count
2,668

CHRISTCHURCH. Press, Volume XXIV, Issue 3214, 18 December 1875

Working