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THE ARRIVAL OF THE LADY JOCELYN.

This fine ship was signalled early yesterday morning, bat no number was np till past noon, and there was a doubt as to whether it was that vessel or not. Immediately it was ascertained it was the Lady Jocelyn the s.s. Gazelle was sent for, and the health officers, agents, Captain Petherbridge, Custom house officer, reporters, and friends of those on board went off. On arrival at the ship, which was anchored nearly at the mouth of the harbor, it was found that there was no infectious disease on board with the exception of the whooping- cough, and the vessel was speedily passed. The Lady Jocelyn has made the best trip i his season, having performed the passage in 79 days. She left Plymouth on November 3rd, and brings no less tb an 577 persons to our shores. This is her second trip to these shores. There were nineteen deaths during the passage, but the general health was excellent. The Burgeon-superiutenctent, Mr H. Pearde, appeared to be a general favourite. Captain Jenkins is no stranger to our shores, and was heartily welcomed. In the sinale men's compartment there were 122 men and uoys, two-thirds of which are agricultural laborers. There are about forty Irish, a few Scotch, and tbe rest are E- glUh. The constables were W. Parker aud H. Quarterman, and we hear from the health officers that they have never visited any ship in which the single men's compartment wad so thoroughly clean. The married couples' compartment was also in excellent order. There were no 'ess than eigh y-one families, and we were here introduced to Mr Thomas o>borne, a delegate from the Agricultural Laborers' Union, who is empowered to Bend back a report as to the capabilities of the province. He. told us that 222 soul** belonging to the union were on board, being composed entirely of agricultural laborers and their families. The constables were Messrs Lyde and Wall, Mr Ostiorne was appointed chief constable, but suffered so much from *ea sickness that be had to resign. A mechanic named Jos Harrop was appointed schoolmaster during the passage, and appears to have gained general good will. This compartment, and, in fact, the whole ship, was admirably venti- j lated. Gangways ran between the bunks and the Ship's side which looked like the streets ot a town. A new feature was the use of Mr Johnson's berths, which fold up, forming stats during the day, and we hear from the doctor that in a_ the twenty-five berths that have been tried as an experiment, there has not been a single case of illness. The single girls' compartment was in beautiful order. The matron, Miss Martha Dysart, seems to have been a very good one; she was assisted by a Miss Parks. There were eighty-two girls, but many of them were very young, and bad their parents on board. The matron gave the girls very good characters: there were about twenty Irish, the rest Knglish, and with a few exceptions they are domestic servants. As usual, a lot of materials for making up into clothes had been sent on board, and these were •liven to the girls who had worked them yesterday. The constables were named Lily, Dorothy, ■and Newell, and they attended well to their duties. The girls had good fun, daueiug, singing, <fee, &c during the passage. Throughout the ship the doctor was highly praised, as were Captain Jenkins, the chief ofticer, Mr Bassett; the second. Mr Morris, Jormerly of the Crusader; the third, Mr Borman, and the purser, Mr Allan, and nearly all these are old familiar faces here. The schoolmaster had an average attendance of s5 during tbe voyage. There was a large condenser on board, capable of making 780 gallons per diem, and tbe engineer told us it had worked well. Whilst we were on board a presentation was made to Dr Pearde of a testimonial, bearing 283 signatures. Mr Osborne in presenting it highly complimented Dr Pearde o_ his conduct during the voyage, and very hearty cheers were given for that gentleman. The doctor returned thanks. Amateur theatricals were indulged in by some of the saloon passengers, ** Betsy Baker," " Whitebait at Greenwich." and several other farces, being performed by a dramatic company consisting of Miss Leach, Mrs Pilditch. Messrs J. and R. Buchanan, Saunders, Innes, and Dr Peatle, and we hear it is their intention to perform for some charitable object in Lyttelton. Two concerts were given by the immigrants, and there were two Rifle Corps, an Athletic ci-b, and a hand, formed during- tbe X? y SF*' ,; doctor was assisted by John geDoßftld, jfe whoa he givaa great praisa. Dr rearde appUtA for and procured from the Royal Society, iQstruiaeute for meteorological gbsero«

The following is the captain's report:—Left London 28th October, and Plymouth 3rd November, Was off the Lizard at noon of the 4th. from which we took our departure. On November ltth, in the latitude of Madeira, when we picked up the N.E. trades, and parsed the Cape de Verde on the thirteenth day out. Crossed the Equator 2Hh November, in lonp .6 40 W. Had moderate S.E. trades, and lost them in US. Then had a week of calms, followed by favorable winds, and reached the meridian of the Cape ol Good Hope 22nd December ,in latitude 40 20 S. From thence had fine strong westerly winds, which carried us down to the Snares, and passed them at noon of the 17th inst. Had favorable winds up the coast to the Nuggets, and w.-re oil'them *t 6 a.m. of the lsth, from thence had light winds and variables till we anchored inside the Heads at noon of the *lst. We left Plymouth with 655 souls ou bo-rd—viz., 554 emigrants, 38 saloon passenjrers. and 6:5 of a crew. During the passage we had * births, 19 deaths—viz, 1 an adult, and 18 children.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18750122.2.3.2

Bibliographic details

THE ARRIVAL OF THE LADY JOCELYN., Press, Volume XXIII, Issue 2940, 22 January 1875

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988

THE ARRIVAL OF THE LADY JOCELYN. Press, Volume XXIII, Issue 2940, 22 January 1875

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