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THE MAYOR'S BANQUET.

In the evening his Worship the Mayor (E B. Bishop, Esq ), gave a banquet at the (Jlarendon Hotel. About fifty gentlemen sat down to a capital repast provided by Mr Gr. Oram. His Worship occupied the chair, having on his right hand His Excellency the Governor, his Lordship the Primate, C. C. Bowen, Esq., the Resident Magistrate ; and Dγ Hector ; and on the left his Honor the Superintendent, his Honor Mr Justice Gresson, Capt. Pitt, Col. Packe, and Hon Joha Hall; the vice-chairs being filled by H. Sawtell, Esq., the retiring Mayor of Christchuxeh, and Mr J. P. Jameson.

Ample justice having been done to the banquet, the usual loyal toasts were given and duly honored. The band of the Yeomanry Cavalry under Herr Biinz, played several selections on the lawn in front of the Hotel durin? dinner.

In proposing the health of " The Queen," his Worship said that he had been informed by his Excellency the Governor that H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh had spoken to him of the hearty aud warm reception he had met with in the province of Canterbury during his visit there. [Cheers.] ■* The Chairman then rose and gave the health of ,s His Excellency the Governor," remarking that it was a matter of deep regret that his Excellency was about to leave them, and he might say that though his Excellency was going from them he felt sure that any intelligence of his Excellency would be received with every demonstration of interest by the colonists of New Zealaud, over whom he had presided so ably and well. He might say that his Excellency had intended to leave Christchurch for Akaroa that morning, but he had, with very great condescension, postponed his visit in order to be present at the dinner that evening. On the part of the City Council he returned their very best thanks to His Excellency for this mark of condescension. [Cheers.] He gave them the " Health of His Excellency the Governor. [ Cheers.]

His Excellency the Governor, who was loudly cheered on rising, said that he should like to express to the gentlemen present the deep feeling of gratitude he felt at the marked expressions of respect which always greeted him on his visits to Christchurch. [Cheers] He bad had the pleasure of being entertained by four Mayors on the occasion of his four visits to Christchurch, first by his friend Mr Anderson who, he was sorry to find was prevented from being present that evening, secondly, by his friend Mr Jameson, who was worthily fulfilling the duties of vice-chair that evening, then by his friend Mr Sawtell, who was also discharging the duties of vicechair most efficiently, and lastly by his very good friend the present Mayor of Christchurch. He thought that the citizens of Christchurch had made a very judicious selection in electing as their Mayor, a Bishop! more especially when they recollected that the settlement was one founded 03 a Church of England settlement. [Laughter.] He hoped his excellent friend the Primate would not feel jealous of the new star which had arisen, nor did he think he would be so, as he had seen the two Bishops making very amicable overtures to one another. [Laughter.] He would not sit down without expressing the very great gratification he felt at noticing on his visits to Christchurch the great strides made by the province of Canterbury, a progress which was made more particularly manifest in connection with the Exhibition opened on Monday last, and he might say that he would here like to take the opportunity of expressing the gratification he felt at listening to the very admirable address of his Honor the Superintendent on the occasion of the opening of that exhibition, an address which, he felt sure, would do good to Canterbury, both in the colony and at home, and he would take care that it was published at home, in order that all might see the progress made by this, the

youngest of colonies. He begged to give them the- bealtb-of his. Worship.the Mayor and tbe City. Council of Gfaristchurch. The toast was drank ieith loud cheers. His Worship the Mayor responded, and said before sitting down he wished to repair an omission into which he had unintentionally fallen—viz., the omission of the name of Lady Bowen. [Hear, hear.] He would give them the health of Lady Bowen. His Honor Mr Justice Gresson proposed the health of "The Aimy, Navy, and Volunteers, con pled with the names "of Major Pitt and Colonel Packe."

Major Pitt briefly returned thanks on behalf of the army.

Colonel Packe rose to respond on behalf of the volunteers. He might say that he felt exceedingly pleased to be present that evening as the guest of his Worship the Mayor. That gentleman had been the first volunteer -who had spoken to him (Colonel Packe), and had persuaded him to become a volunteer. There was only one drawback, and that was that his Worship had persistently refused promotion. He stuck to his post as the right hand man of his company. He had very much pleasure in responding to the toast. His Excellency the Governor rose to propose the next toast, " The health of his Honor the Superintendent." [Loud Cheers.] His Honor, who was loudly cheered on rising, briefly responded to the toast. Mr C. 0. Bowen, resident magistrate, then proposed " The health of the clergy of all denominations, coupled with the health of the Primate of New Zealand, Bishop Harper." [Cheers] His Lordship the Primate, in responding, spoke of the pleasure he felt at being present that evening as the guest of his Worship the Mayor, who waa one of his flock, and who he might say he was glad to see in the position he occupied that evening. [Cheers.] The Hon John Hall then rose to propose the " Bench and Bar of New Zealand." He might say that he felt sure that no one amongst them could fox one moment doubt that the province of Canterbury possessed a Bench and Bar second to none in New Zea land, as far as integrity of purpose and singleness of heart went. His Honor the Judge, they all knew, had in his capacity as a private citizen, earned the respect and esteem of the whole community, aud iv his official capacity he had shown them how an upright judge conld bear himself. With regard to the Resident Magistrate, Mr Bovven, he might say that no man had made himself so popular, without for one moment seeking to do so, as Mr Bowen. [Cheers.]

His HONOR the Judge said that he desired to return thanks to the company present for the kind manner in which the toast had been received. Although some time must elapse before they could hope to attain the eminence and. ability of the Bench of England, he would say that the Bench of New Zealand would not yield to any one in a wish to do their dnty uprightly and honestly, and with a strict impartiality. [Loud cheers.] Mr C. C. Bowen briefly returned thanks. Dr Foster also returned thanks on behalf of the Bar.

Mr John Ollivieb proposed the toast of " The General Assembly and the Colonial Ministers," coupled with the names of the Hon John Hall and his Honor W. Kolleston.

The toast was drunk with loud applause.

The Hon John HALL briefly acknowledged the honor done in the toast. He felt sure they would not wish him on an occasion of this kind to enter into the realm of politics ; therefore, he would confiue himself to returning thanks for the kind manner in which the toast had been received. [Cheers.]

His Honor the Superintendent also returned thanks.

At this stage of the proceedings his Excellency the Governor retired, expressing the great satisfaction he felt at spending his last evening in Christchurch so pleasantly.

The following toasts were afterwards proposed and drunk with all the honors :—:"The Provincial Council,' by his Honor the Superintendent ; responded to by Messrs luglis and Andrews. '' The City Council of Christchurch," by his Honor the Superintendent ; responded to by his Worship the Mayor. "The gentlemen who formerly occupied the chair, either as Chairmen or Mayors," by Mr Inglis, and responded to by the hon John Hall and Mr Wm Wilson. " The City Solicitor," respondel to by Dr Foster. ''The Board of Conservators," by Mr W. Montgomery ; responded to by Mr Harman. " The Officers of the City Council," proposed hy Mr' H. Sawtell, ex-May or; respouded to by Messrs Geo. Gordon and C. Cuff. " Our Visitors," proposed by Mr C. Clark, and responded to by Dγ Hector. "The Ladies," proposed by Mr J. P. Jameson. After which the company broke up.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18721219.2.21

Bibliographic details

THE MAYOR'S BANQUET., Press, Volume XX, Issue 2304, 19 December 1872

Word Count
1,458

THE MAYOR'S BANQUET. Press, Volume XX, Issue 2304, 19 December 1872

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