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NEWS OF THE DAY.

His Honor the Judge will hold the usual Chamber Sittings, this day, at 11 a.m.

On Saturday last the Maoris engaged at Mr Buchanan's whaling station, Ikolaki, succeeded in capturing a fine right whale.

According to a Wellington contemporary it is the talk on the beach that the Messrs Brogden are about to start a foundry somewhere along the water line.

A meeting of the sub-committee of the Canterbury Flax Association will be held at the rooms of the sssociation, Cashel street, this day, at 3 p.m.

A meeting of the Provisional Directors of the proposed Canterbury Club, will be held at 3.30 p.m. to-morrow, at the Crystal Palace Depot, to ballot for members and other business.

Mr W. Murray, of Lyttelton, had a valuable horse killed yesterday. It appears the animal got out of the paddock and strayed on the Sumner road ; a portion of the road not being fenced, it got on to the dangerous slope, and fell over the cutting, and was instantly killed.

The contractor for the alterations of the Theatre Royal, taking advantage of the few fine days we have had, is pushing rapidly forward with the work. Already the front begins to assume an imposing appearance, and the interior is, under the hands of the decorators, rapidly being changed from its former dirt and darkness character.

As will be seen from an advertisement appearing in another column, the drawing for the St. Michael's Art Union has been definitely fixed. Previous to the distribution an exhibition of the prizes will be held in the Music Hall, on the 27th, 28th, and 29th August, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. The numbers of the winning tickets will be made known on the 30th, and the distribution take place on that day and the next, between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m, and 5 p.m. and 9 p.m.

Hereford street appears destined, of all the streets in Christchurcb, to become the Lombard street, the abode of all the large mercantile establishments of the city. In addition to the three large banks, the NewZealand Insurance Company's building, and a host of merchants' stores, there is now in course of erection three large brick buildings, of a more than ordinary substantial character, viz., those of Messrs C. Clark, Jones Brothers, and L. E. Nathan, the former and latter of which are rapidly approaching completion. We understand also that another store will shortly be built between that now being erected by Messrs Jones Brothers and the office recently occupied by Mr Lean, architect.

Mr Morton Tavares purposes giving an entertainment at the Music Hall to-morrow evening, divided into two parts, the first being a lecture upon Charles Dickens, with readings from "David Copperfield ;" and the second a petite cpmedy, " Married Couple," in which Miss Surtees will appear. Perhaps in the whole range of Dickens works, there is none which for simple pathos and quiet humor can equal " David Copperfield." It is said that of all his creations the author fancied this one most, and we are glad therefore that Mr Tavares has selected this work as his jllusr tration of the genius of Dickens. From the known ability of Mr Tavares as an elocutionist, we anticipate a pleasant evening's enjoyment.

The nomination of candidates for the vacant seat in the General Assembly for the Heathcote district, caused by the resignation, of the Hon. Johu Hall, will take place this day at noon, at the Heathcote Road Board office, Ferry road. The only candidate publicly before foe /electors is Sir J. C. Wilson, C.8., X.C.5.1., but it ie uaderstppd that Mr W. H. Wynn Williams will be nominated ip opposition. The polling will take place on Friday, next. A series of meetings for the purpose of hearing the views of the various candidates havp been arranged, the first of winch wjll take place this .evening at the Wooiston schoolroom, at seyen o'clock. Other meetings in the various porfjons .of the district have also been arraujjed, in order to allow candidates an opportunity of making knpwn their views to the electors.

We beg to Remind those who intend to take part in the apprcaciimg performance of Haudel's " Judas Maccabaeus," that a geueral rehearsal takes place this evening. The Christchurch Musical Society invite the cooperation of all who are acquainted with the music, in order that the choruses maybe rendered as massively as possible, 'jffce prjee of jidinission has been fixed at 2s 6d, and we trust ithe society's endeavors will be appreciated. It must be vci-y discouraging to find, as too often happens, tiiaj evprf effort has been made to render classical music in as efficient a manner as possible, which necessarily entails considerable expense, the patronage granted is much less than is bestowed on performances of not nearly so high a CAate, and which can be produced without the constant practice er.ch music as Handel's must entail, and with, comoajajliyelj H9 cost.

Mr Yule and his workmen on Saturday last while excavating near to the breakwater, discovered a Maori skeleton. The skull is in possession of Dγ Donald, and will, we understand, be sent to the Museum.

The Ellesmere Mutual Improvement Association held the usual fortnightly meeting on Saturday last, Mr J. Bennie presiding. Mr H. Rothery read an excellent paper on the " Conservancy of the Canterbury rivers." After sketching the principal features peculiar to the Canterbury rivers, Mr Rothery advocated a plan of sowing the banks of the rivers with some quick-growing plant, such as English broom, which he considered preferable to gorse, as it was less liable to burn, and would consequently be a better medium for catching drift sand, or for accumulating silt where an overflow should take place. Embankments and protective works were of course necessary in the meantime to avert any impending destruction ; but the planting of the river banks was the natural, and therefore the best, way of keeping the rivers within bounds. He advocated the extensive planting of willows next to the waters' edge, then a belt of English broom, and in the back ground trees of larger growth. Mr Rothery concluded by etating that the natural conditions which had tended to the preservation of the river banks had been very much altered since the country had been settled. Flocks of sheep kept down the native herbage, and occasional grass fires swept the soil completely bare. This allowed the wind to carry off the fine sand and scoop out holes in the bank, and was the natural means of diverting the river; and he urged the necessity of restoring with all possible speed the natnral conditions necessary for their preservation. The essay was very favorably criticised by the members of the association, one member who advocated building concrete walls, alone dissenting. Mr E. Thomson then gave a recitation, "On, Highlanders, On !" which received a favorable criticism, the only defect being a too rapid enunciation. It was intimated that at next meeting Messrs J. Lambie and R. Thomson would act as principals in discussing the following question : —" Is it expedient to create a state agricultural department in New Zealand?" Mr Lambie in the affirmative, and Mr Thomson in the negative ; Mr F. Badham to give a reading on the same ocoasion.

A football match was played on Saturday last between the Christchurch Club and the College and Heathcote Clubs. These clubs have met once before this season, on which occasion the united clubs obtained three goals to one, but then the town did not play their full strength. On Saturday last, however, their side was much stronger only one or two of their good players being absent. They had a few more players than their opponents, and had also the advantage of weight. Shortly after three o'clock play was commenced. At first the ball was unpleasantly near the United Club goal, but by some good play was taken down to their opponents' goal, only however to be returned to the centre again. The game was very evenly contested, the ball being in neutral ground for a long time. At last by some good forward play the United Clubs obtained a touch down, but the try was unsuccessful. At half time no other advantage had been gained by either side. When the goals had been exchanged, the ■College and Heathcote at once took the ball up to their opponents' goal, and Mr Rutherford gave the final kick, which sent it between the posts above the line, thus scoring one for his side. The Christchurch seemed determined not to be beaten, and worked harder than before, and after about a quarter of an hour's play, Mr F. Barker obtained a touch down ; Mr Mainwaring, the club captain, kicked a goal. The game was continued with much spirit on both sides, but without any further success on either side, except the College and Heathcote obtained another touch down, but the try again failed. A great number of spectators—amongst whom were several ladies—assembled to witness the game. The match will be continued on Saturday next, when we anticipate a good contest, as each side has now one goal.

We are informed that duriug the past week Mr E. G, Wright has commenced his contract for the formation and construction of the last section of the Northern railway this side of the Ashley, viz.:—From Southbrook to the Rangiora terminus. The Government has had three different lines surveyed and under consideration, and has eventually decided upon one that crosses the Rangiora and Woodend road, at about twelve chains fropi the Junction hotel, and the station will be on the open sectipn of land opposite the Lion property, and known as Ponsonby's section. The site of the station pre-eminently suits the requirements of the place, it is in a central position and accessible from three sides. It is probable that the line will be finished in about three months, as Mr Wright's contract is to be completed by the Ist of November, and if the Government were to push forward the erection of the station buildings simultaneously with the construction of the line, it m£y be fairly opened for traffic by the nest wool an 4 grairj season. Until the Agamemnon arrives we hear that there are not sufficient railway chairs in the province to complete the line, but there is a consignment on board that vessel, and it is po be hoped that she will soon turn up, as she has been put over HO days. We are informed that it is rot the intention of the authorities to open the line as far as Southbrook until the other section is completed, and the residents of the township are looking forward with great pleasure to its then being opened. They are much gratified with fh.e consideration shown them by the Government, }£ phposing a line in accordance with their wishes, but have no dpubf but that it will be as much to the Interest of the Government as their own.

The last of the scries of eutertainment for tlie yresGpt season, which have been given under the auspices of the popular Entertainments Association, will take place this evening, and a truly monster programme has been prepared. Not only have our Christchurch Amateurs, hoph ladies and gentlemen, come forward to help in making this, tl;e last of the series, thoroughly attractive, but some of onr Lyttelton friinds have also placed their at tlje disposal of the committee. In addition ip a perfect cw^a/ , d'; richexse of songs, Hacts, readings, &c., vye have the dialogue competition for the prize offered by the association, and for which three competitors have entered lists. This portion should not be the least attractive of the evening's programme. The very Rev. the Pean. yf Curistchurch will occupj the

chair upon the occasion. We may further note that the admission fee will be 6d all round, either children or adults. Another salutary rule, and one we should like to sec carried out at all ordinary as well as extraordinary entertainments, is that no one except performers and the committee are to be allowed on the platform on the occasion. At those performances which have already taken place, not only the platform, but the approaches thereto have been crowded up so that it has hardly been possible for those engaged in singing or playing to get on the platform except at personal inconvenience. In reviewing the entertainments which have already been given, we think the thanks of the public generally are due to the committee for having provided so excellent and well-conducted entertainments as those which have been given during the continuance of the present series, and we feel certain that all classes of the community will unite in paying a just tribute of praise to those gentlemen who have so unweariedly and so successfully labored in the direction of providing a rational and at the same time inexpensive amusement for all. The amount of work and labor attached to this is only known to those engaged in it, and we can testify to the large amount of trouble taken by the hon. sec, Mr Gordon, and one or two working members of the committee, notably Mr W. R. Mitchell, to render the series a success. We had hoped that the committee would have seen its way clear to continue the series up to the close of what are considered to be the winter months, as the season being so far advanced now, it is hardly likely that the parish entertainments will occupy the ground, and there will therefore be a hiatus of several weeks.

On Saturday last one of the pilgrim fathers of Canterbury—one of those who stood by the cradle of the infant province, and who was in the olden time thoroughly identified with its public history—passed away from our midst full of years, honored and respected by all who knew him. We allude to the late Mr Kichard Packer, who though for the past ten years retired from public life, yet at one time took an active part in the affairs of the province. Mr Packer arrived in the colony at the latter end of 1851 in the Travancore, and his large —for that period —store on the site of the present Bank of Australasia in Cashel street, was quite a feature in the landscape of the then uninhabited plain. He was for many years, indeed up to the time of his death, a member of the Waste Lands Board ; he was also Provincial Secretary under Mr FitzGeratd, the first Superintendent of Canterbury, and was also afterwards a member of the Executive without portfolio. During the whole of his colonial career Mr Packer earned for himself the respect and esteem of all with whom he came in contact, and his upright conduct and unswerving honesty of purpose in the discharge of his public duties also earned for him the thorough confidence of his constituents. He represented the city of Christchurch in the Provincial Council for some years, and only resigned when he found that he was physically unable to discharge the duties efficiently. During yesterday the flag on the Government Buildings was hoisted at half-mast, as a token of respect to one who for many years held appointments under the Provincial Government. The death of Mr Packer removes another of that band of colonists now, alas, rapidly passing away, who, some twenty-one years ago, founded the thriving and prosperous province of to-day, and of whom, comparatively speaking, only a handful remain.

A special meeting of the Presbyterian Church Extension Association Committee was held on Thursday last. Present —Revs. C. Fraser (president), A. P. Douglas, W. S. McGowan, J. Campbell ; Messrs Anderson, Watt, Sutherland, Macpherson, and the Secretary. Dr Campbeil was also present. The meeting having been opened with prayer, the minutes of last meeting were read and confirmed. It was notified that the Bey. H. M. Murray, one of the Association's ministers, had arrived in Christchurch, and the special business of the meeting was the consideration of the field of labor most requiring Mr Murray's presence. A letter and telegrams from Mr R. A. Chisholm, Secretary Presbyterian Church, Timaru, were laid on the table, requesting the Association to grant one or two months supply of Mr Murray. The Rev. W. S. M'Gowan moved—' . That the Rev. H. M. Murray be appointed to Timaru for one month, dating from Saturday, 27th instant. Mr Anderson seconded the motion. Some discussion ensued and ultimately Mr A. Duncan moved as an amendment —"That the Rev. H. M. Murray be appointed to labour in connection wUh the Timaru branch of the association for one month, dating from Saturday, 27th instant." Mr J. D; Macpherson seconded the amendment, which, on being put, was carried by a majority of two. The Bey. A. P. Douglas gave an account of the services conducted by him afc Ashley Bank, Sefton, and Leithfield on Sabbath last. The report was a most encouraging one, relative to the important field of present vacant through the translation of the Rev, W. Hogg to Ross. The secretary urged upon the committee the desirability of assisting the Westland Association in tiying to provide for a minister at Ueefton. and suggested that the Association might cons ; der whether they could not supplement the offer of stipend made by the Westlfind Association. It was moved by tho Rev. J. Campbeli, seconded by Mr J. D. Macpherson, and agreed to—" That the president, secretary, Rev. A. F. Douglas, Mr Watt, and the mover be appointed a committee to consider what steps may be taken to provide supply for B.cefjton." The report of the Rev R. Ewen, dated July 10th, wa§ received and cousidpred, apd the association expressed iheii - entire satisfaction with the work done by him, and farther, that the suggestion made by him in the latter part of his letter be referred to the Moderator of his district, with a request that he make arrangements to carry the came into effect at his earliest convenience, i'tte committee then adjourned.

In the Assembly the other day Mr Johnston cioyed that there be laid upon the table .1 return of the names ot &ii persons for whom travelling espouses have been paid duriug the financial year ending June 30, 1872. The hon. member, says the Indepen-

dent, stated }.hat as there had been an. utter absence of political agitation throughout the colony, and of any other cause which could divert the miuds of the Government, it was only reasonable to suppose that their admiuistraiive duties would be performed in as

perfect a manner as possible ; and he hoped the return would prove that this had been the case. It was his duty, however to point out that the departmental and travelling expenses should be reduced as much as possible; in fact he thought the absence of the disturbiug causes to which he had referred was a good reason .why the burdens of the taxpayers should be very considerably lightened. The Government had large sums of money confided to their hands to be expended for the public welfare, and they were bound to show in what manner they have performed their trust. He did not insinuate for one moment that the money had been improperly expended, but it was the duty of the House to look strictly into such mattersMr Fox said there was not the slightest objection to furnish the return, because he agreed with the hon. member that it was perfectly right that the House should have specific information on all subjects involving specific expenditure. He would merely observe that while the Government would procure the return with all alacrity and pleasure, it would be found that there had been considerable amounts disbursed in the expenses of officers of the departments who had travelled in the service of the Government. There were fixed scales of allowance for the different grades of officers in the Government employed on such service, aud only in very exceptional cases where there might be special reasons were those scales departed from. The return he believed would show that there had been no extravagaut expenditure under this head. Motion agreed to.

Our correspondent at the Cust writes : — The ploughing match committee met at Messent's Halfway house, for the purpose of an anqing for the match. Present:—Messrs Howson, Dobbs, Morrison, Free, Cumming. White, Collier, and Garland. Before the committee proceeded to the business of the evening, it was hinted that it would be as well if Mr Howson were to read the reply received from Rangiora with regard to smiths' charges, as there were a goodly number present expecting that there was to be a public meeting about it. Some were of the opinion that a meeting could be held after the other business was over. Mr Garland said that it would be impossible to have the two meetings that night. It was drawing on late in the evening, but he thought that if the reply wae read to those who were there, and a meeting held that night week, by that time it would be well circulated, and a large meeting might be expected to carry the resolutions passed at the former meeting into effect. The reply was then read, which was to the effect that the "former prices are to be strictly adhered to." The ploughing match business was then proceeded with. Mr Garland proposed, and Mr Free seconded that Mr Howson take the chair. Carried. Minutes of last meeting read and confirmed. It was proposed by Mr Garland, and seconded by Mr White, that the match take place next Wednesday fortnight, the 14th instantWith regard to Mr Guild's proposition at last meeting about the wheel and swing classes, Mr Garland thought that the swing and wheel should go together, as he thought that a sufficient field of swings could not be brought together so as to warrant them in giving a prize. After a deal of argument for and against, it was at last decided that there should be two classes. The following propositions were carried:—"That there be three judges for horses and harness, and three for ploughing"; " That the following gentlemen be written to, requesting them to act, viz., for ploughing, Messrs M'Gregor (Leithfield), Stevenson (Flaxton), and Atkinson (Fernside) ; for horses and harness, Messrs Edwards (Kaiapoi), M'lntyre (Fernside), Dalzell (Leithfield) " ; "That a notice be placed in Messent's, requesting offers of land for the match, to be sent in by next Saturday night" ; " That Messrs Garland, Dobbs, White, and Collier be appointed a committee to select land suitable"; "That Mr Howson be requested to get a flag made, to.be the property of the committee,' ; " That tenders be invited from the Cust and Oxford districts for the publican's booth, also a confectioner's stall; " That the meetings be alternately, between the two houses;" " That the dinner be tendered for at so much per head by the resident publicans;" "That there be a champion, wheel, double-furrow, boy's and swing, if sufficient competition." All tenders to be in by next Saturday night. Some of the subscription lists were handed in when the secretary showed an amount of £22 in hand, besides several extra prizes. The next meeting takes place at the Cleveland next Monday evening, at 7 p.m. It is hoped that the committee will be more punctual than at the last meeting. pi

The receipts for the New York Hcral advertising range from 2500d01s to 3000dols per day, according %o the chances in the busy season of the year. Bennett's income from his real estate and newspaper is 225,000 dole per year, and that of his son 45,000d015.

The fjnanci tl statement of the Canadian Dominion shows extraordinary elasticity in the revenue of the dominion. The surplus in 1871 was nearly 4,000,000 dole. ; in 1872 the surplus is estimated at 3,500,000 dols., and in 1873 at 1,000,000. The expenditure proposed for public works, exclusive of the Pacific Railroad, 15,000,000 dol. No alteration will be made in the tariff,-but the capitation tax upon immigrants is to be abolished. The Premier has introduced a measure giving effect %a tho Canadian clauses of the Treaty oil Washington.

A majority of the Senatus of the Edinburgh University recently decided to defend the action of declarator brought against them by the lady students, and they have just given in their answers of condescendence of the pursuers. Six of the professors (Benuet, Lorimer, Calderwood, Massou, Charteris, and Hodgson) have, however, declined to be parties to the defenqe of the action, and have entered a minpte giving at length their rea T sons for such refusal, the last being that they would "individually feel ashamed of appearing as defenders in such an action."

A fearful storm brpke over Manchester on May 16tb. In the morning tlic weather wag bright and warm, but towards noon it grew dull, and the clouds gathered so rapidly tljat at four o/clook it was as dark as during an eclipse. At that time a govere thunderstorm broke over the city, and lasted for about an hour. The iirst peal of thunder was of a most terrific character, and it was rapidly followed by other peals, though not of the same violence. The lightning was very vivid, and ti,e rain descended in tor* rents to such an extent that in a very short time tnahy of the drains were choked, ami several of the principal streets were flooded. The storm undoubtedly was one of the most violent and prolonged that has occurred in U>is district fyr many years nast.

The Xatal Colonist wptes :—"A rac.c meeting is .advertised to take place 'at the Diamond fields, aud from all accounts will be the richest in stakes that his ever been ijeld in Sr,utU Africa. From v private lettcf we learn wa a 'paid for the monopoly of the site for a grand stand, and that on the day following the purchase no lass than :;00U tickets at a guinea a-picce were sold,"

A rumour is afloat that Mr Qladston not seek re-election at Greenwich W W stand for Chester. ' l *ill Dr W. B. Carpenter, probably the hit>l, authority on the subject of deep-eea tlr i ing, says that the temperature of tronil seas differs so much in proportion to a depth, that below two thousand fathoms a cold is as great as that of high latitudes Iα the animals found at these great depths aemble the forms which occur in the eiren 1 *" polar seas. nm "

The Philadelphia Ledger says that opium eating has become common in the Unit i States, and particularly in the West. Tv, Legislature of Kentucky, in order to'cherv this practice, has just passed a Bill that the affidavit of two respectable citizens' •> person who, through the excessive opium, arsenic, hasheesh, or of any drJ" has become incompetent to manage or his estate, may be confined in an asylum and placed under guardianship, as in ♦?' case of habitual drunkards or lunatics, %

An Auckland contemporary of Ju ne ~ gives the following account of & murder at Papakura :—On Thursday ing about 7 o'clock, Mrs Gray, wife of Thos Gray, an old settler in Papakura, reports' to Constable Walker that her husband «*! dead or dying. The constable immediate!* proceeded to the house, and found Gray lying partly on his face in bed, quite dead and cold. On examining the body, he dis covered an iucised wound on the left aide of the face, between the nose aud cheekbone, about an inch long, from which a form quantity of blood had flowed, which appa r . ently had been caused by some sharp instru". meut. It seems the deceased and bia wife had been quarrelling during the morning and that Mrs Gray had left home about elwen o'clock, and had gone to the Tapakura How where she remained some hours, statin* to the people at the time that the old mauVa bad, and she had left him in bed, and had locked the door and taken the key with ha From the different statements and unsatis' factory answers to the questions put to her by Constable Walker, he apprehended he? og suspicion of having been concerned in tka old man's death, and lodged her in tbs lock-up. The constable proceeded to Auckland the same night to inform the Coroner aud an inquest was held yesterday. The deceased was about seventy years of ag» and his wife is about fifty.

A shocking talc of sufferings at eeaistold by the Louisville Ledger, which Bays;— " The Holland arrived at New York on the 21th of March (from what port is not stated) after a long and boisterous trip, with 650 passengers on board, being at least 200 mot! than she had accommodation for. The vessel had been at sea but a few days when it was discovered the stock of provisions was terj light. In less than a week all the flour, potatoes, and other vegetables were eihausted, aud the passengers were reduced to a diet of ship biscuit and horse beef, and this of the poorest quality, and doled out in the smallest portions. Starvation begnn to stare the wretched emigrants in the fsice, although the ship's officers and crew eecmed to have plenty of good and healthy food. To all appeals for v fair division of this food among the emigrants, the officers and crew only an. swered with curses and blows. Sickness broke out among the emigrants, and in their desperation some of them made an effort to secure more food, but were knocked down and kicked and beaten by the crew. Many of these miserable people—men, women, and children—were exposed on deck to the cold, aud were badly frozen. To such a degree of starvation were these emigrants reduced, that when their scanty allowance of foodws issued to them, they had to fight for its possession, the desperation of the half-starved passengers, under the impulse of self-preserva-tion, leading them to try to take by forw from the weakest their share of the wretched food. The horse-beef was absolutely half rotten, and its stench almost stifling, yet the emigrants were forced to eat it to save thens from the horrible death by starvation. The limbs of many women and children, as ■well as those of a number of men, were so severely frozen that in many cases amputation will k necessary. A report of the sufferings oi these emigrants was made to the authorities in New York."

The Wellington Evening Post gives tio following particulars of an improHttiftivt made by Mr Kelly in flax-dressing machinery :—At the meeting of the Philosojffifcal Association on Saturday eveuing last, a model of a new flax-dressing machine, made by Mr Kelly, M.H.R., was exhibited. In explaining the principle of the machine, he said that having found in the practical working of Price's small machine many defects of construction, he had endeavored to remedy them in this model. The principle of operation was the same, viz., beaters fixed on the face of a drum revolving at a high speed, adjusted to dresa the flax on the face of the lower feed roller. The principal fentures of his improvements were a means of adjustment of the space between the face of the lower roller on which the beaters operate, and the beaters, while the machine is running. This is effected by n. differential screw, which operates on the bearings of the lower roller. A halfturn of this screw moves the bearer the one hundred and twentieth part of an inch, which is sufficiently fine for all practical purposes. The indiarubber spring?, which keep up the lower roller to the revolving beater, are placed in the rear of tbe standards which hold the bearings of tb? feed roller, enabling the roller to be replaced without displacing any portion oi the machine or being liable to lie saturated with oil from the bearings. An improrement is also made in fixing and adjustiojj the scraping plate ; larger bearings are used. An improvement in the guiding of the feed motion, in the keying of the cast iron collars to the roller spindles, and the making and fitting of the cover. He stated that the principle he went on was to feed at the rate of from 120 to 125 feet per minute, give not lees than 10 nor more thau 12 blows to the inch, and drive the stripping drum with a surface velocity of not less than ?0 feet per second. If those conditions were complied with the stripping would b* effected, although there was an open space between the lower roller and the beater, When the surface velocity of the drum a lowered to 40 feet per secoud, it necessitated the machine being set close, and consequently cut the fibre. Mr Kelly stated that his improvements could also be applied to Huch as Gibbons', which pressed on a fi* 6 " bar, as he had designed a composition bat *£ be applied to such machines.

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NEWS OF THE DAY., Press, Volume XX, Issue 2884, 30 July 1872

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5,491

NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume XX, Issue 2884, 30 July 1872

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