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ANNUAL DINNER OF THE GERMAN SOCIETY.

The first annual dinner of the Canterbury Deutscher Verein, or German Society, took place last evening at Barrett's hotel. A really splendid spread was put upon the table by host Herr Schmidt, the cuisine being all that could be desired. Amongst the delicacies provided for the guests was zimmetkuchen, for the first time iv Canterbury, which was highly appreciated by the sous of Fatherland. About fifty gentlemen sat down to dinner, the chair being occupied by Past President Herr Ruddenklau, supported on the right by Herr Sandstein. Present— President of the Deutscher Verein, and Herr Bourgeois, secretary ; and on the left by Herr Thielc and Herr Furhmann. The vice chairs were filled bj Herr Schmidt and Herr Vogel respectively. Ample justice having been done to the good things provided, The Chairman rose and gave the health of ■' Her Gracious Majesty the Queen," remarking that they as Germans were proud to be under British rule, the more so as they claimed the Queen as one of their country women. The toast was drunk with enthusiasm and loud cheers. Song—Mr Thos. Hobbs. The Chairman then rose and gave the " Prince and Princess of Wales, and the rest of the Royal Family." He felt sure that they as well as all Englishman were rejoiced to hear of his recovery from his recent dangerous illness, and he felt sure he was only echoing their sentiments when he said " God bless the Prince of Wales." The toast was drunk with loud cheers. The Chairman then gave " The Deutscher Kaiser, the Kronz Priutz, and United Germany." [Cheers.] He was sure the patriotism of all present would respond to the toast. [Loud cheers.] It was a great thing for Germany and the world in general, that Germany had united in one vast confederation. [Cheers.] The toast was drunk with the utmost enthusiasm. Chorus—"Die Wacht am Rhein." The Chairman rose, and said the next toast he had to propose was " The English and German Army aud Navy." He coupled these together, because in old times the English and German armies had often fought on the same side, and he hoped they would long do so. In fact, if the German and English armies and navies were combined, they would defy the world. [Cheers.] The toast was drunk with three times three.

Song—Herr Schneider. Herr Bourgeois replied on behalf of the German army. He had been in that army for some nine years, during which period he had gone through the battles of Solferino, Sec. He thought if England modelled her army on the German principle they would find it much to their advautagc.

Mr Andrews replied on behalf of the English navy. He felt it would be unnecessary for him to say much about the navy, as their deeds were written in history. He could say that whenever in the course of his travels he had come across a German or other vessel, they had always met with the greatest courtesy. He hoped the present amity between the two Governments would last for centuries vet to come.

Herr Sands! ien then rose and proposed the next toast, " The Governor of New Zealand and the General Assembly." They had much cause to be grateful for the liberal laws under which they lived—a liberal Government quite as much as any

man could desire. The General Assembly had initiated a system of immigration, and had sent for a uumbcr of Germans, as it had been said that Germans mane the best colonists. He hoped the Assembly when they had tried the experiment, would find that the German immigrants were a credit to the country from which they come. [Cheers.] The toast was drunk with three times three. Chorus— i; Out in the distance." The Chairman then gave''The Superintendent and the Provincial Council." These bodies made laws for the province, and he thought that they ought specially to be grateful to the Council, seeing that they had voted a liberal sum for their church. The toast was drunk with three times three, aud three cheers for Mr Joynt. Chorus —" Lutzow's Wild Chase." Herr Thiele then rose and proposed the next toast—'• The Mayor and the City Council." He thought they were much indebted to the City Council for the many improvements visible in Christchurch from the old times. He thought, however, that the City Council should look into the drainage of the city, and see that it was propoily drained. The toast was drunk with loud cheers. Song—Herr Schneider, "The Land of Tyrol." Herr Ruddenklau responded to the toast. He looked back upon the period when he was a member of that Council with much pride, not on his own account, but simply because every member worked for the good of the city. [Hear, hear.] He thanked them on behalf of the Mayor and the City Council for the manner in which they had received the toast. [Cheers.] Chorus. " The Morning Ray." Herr Fuhrmann rose to propose the toast of the evening, " Prosperity to the Deutschcr Verein." He would like to say that the union of the Germans was not only for Germans but for Englishmen, and they were always glad to see them present amongst them, as was the case that eveniug. He was in favor of union, as it was strength. With regard to what had been said about armies, he hoped the day was coming when the sword would be laid aside, aud national disputes settled by arbitration, as in the case of private disputes. If instead of arming themselves to the teeth, the nations of the world would follow the example of England in the Alabama case and refer their differences to arbitration, the day would soon arrive when the sword would be turned into the reaping-hook. [Cheers.J He looked to the day when they would have one language, one postal system, and one law of national arbitration. [Cheers.J The toast was drunk with loud cheers. Chorus—" Eundesleid."

Herr Sandstein returned thanks on behalf of the Verein. They were associated to assist those who might be in need, in cases of sickness, which was a wise provision. [Hear, hear.] From this had sprung the German Church — [hear, hear] —and now that the Germans were united they had begun to look after their spiritual as well as their worldly concerus, and it was felt that seeing that a number of immigrants from Germany coming in it was only right that they should have a place of worship in which they could worship in the tongue of their fatherland. [Cheers.] They had, as a society, been most successful, as all had been coming in and none going out. For their success they had been much indebted to their late president, Mr Ruddenklau, who had worked hard in their behalf. [Cheers.] Song — " Fiinfthundert Teufels " — Mr Bourgeois. The chairman then gave the toast of " The Press of Christchurch." All had been done by the press of Christchurch to advance their interests. He had much pleasure in proposing "The Press," coupled with the name of Mr Hart." The toast was drunk with three times three and musical honors. Song—" Heart, why so Dreary," Mr JacobBen, junr. Mr Hart and Mr Hebden briefly returned thanks. Mr Sandstein then in eulogistic terms proposed the health of " The Chairman," stating that the German Society and the Germans generally of Christchurch were indebted greatly to his increased efforts on their behalf. The toast was drunk with loud cheers. Mr Ruddenklau returned thanks. "Our English Visitors," proposed by Mr Fuhrmann, and other toasts, coucluded the list, and after spending a very pleasant evening, the party dispersed.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18720613.2.7

Bibliographic details

ANNUAL DINNER OF THE GERMAN SOCIETY., Press, Volume XIX, Issue 2844, 13 June 1872

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1,274

ANNUAL DINNER OF THE GERMAN SOCIETY. Press, Volume XIX, Issue 2844, 13 June 1872

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