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NEWS OF TEE DAY.

A special train will run from Christchurch to Kaiapoi on the 20th after the Te Deum concert. Telegraphic communication was interrupted yesterday between Napier and Auckland, aud between Christchurch and Hokitika. A steamer bringing, we presume, the Suez late telegrams, arrived in Auckland early yesterday morning ; but although the line broke down about two o'clock in the afternoon, some six or seven hours after the arrival of the steamer, we have received no message. The final practice at Spensley's Hall, of the "Dettingen Te Deum" and selectious from the " Messiah," for performance at the Wesleyan Musical Festival, on Thursday week, went off better last night than on any previous occasion, giving promise of a very successful entertainment. A rehearsal will, we believe, be given in the Chapel before the

performance,

We are informed that the telegram from Hokitika with reference to the cattle sales there, appearing in Wednesday's issue, is incorrect. The following are the correct prices realised at the sales on Tuesday, as supplied by the auctioneers, Messrs Mark Sprot and Co. :—SB head of cattle at £7 5s per head ; 59 head at £7 I2s 6d ; and 60 head at £7 13s. An examination of the children attending the Eyreton Sunday school took place at the schoolroom on Sunday last, conducted by Mr C. Merton assisted by Miss Row and the master, when, through the liberality of friends, sixteen prizes, consisting of books, were awarded to the most deserving of the children, and the school broke up for the winter months. We see, by a notice in our advertising columns, that the committee of St Michael's school propose to reorganise the school, after the midwinter holidays, on a new basis, as a boys' school only. They have been so fortunate as to secure the services as head master, of Mr Charles J. Merton, whose training under his father at Rangiora, and successful experience as master of St Luke's school, pre-eminently qualify him for the efficient discharge of the duties of the important post he is about to occupy. We understand that other improvements in the school are in contemplation, which will be detailed in a prospectus shortly to be issued.

A Court for hearing the appeals to the Borough assessment was held at the Kaiapoi Resident Magistrate's Court, on Wednesday last. On the Bench were G. L. Mellish, Esq., R.M., and E. G. Kerr, Esq., Mayor ; Mr C. E. Dudley, the valuer, was also in attendance. The following objections and reductions were heard and allowed—Mr G. H. Blackwcll, shop, Sec, assessed at £40 reduced to £37 ; Messrs M. H. and C. Oram, hotel, &c, assessed at £160 reduced to £120 ; Mr E. A. Lock, house, assessed at £30 reduced to £20 ; Mr Joseph Keetley, house and shop, assessed at £60 reduced to £50.

The monthly Lincoln Fair took place on Tuesday, 11th instant. About forty head of cattle were entered, and were all sold, anything like beef meeting a ready sale at fully 20s per lOOlbs. Stores fetched current rates. A considerable number were also sold outside the yards, and we cannot help censuring the practice of evading the fees which are charged at the fair, and are very small. By taking such a course those doing so will seriously injure the fair, and eventually will lose the chance of selling at all without going to Christchurch. A mob of old merino ewes in lamb to Leicester rams (about 250) were withdrawn, the price asked (7s) exceeding buyers' views, though many present would have purchased at a more moderate figure. Mr J. H. Bennett held his usual auction sale at oue o'clock and succeeded in disposing of several lots.

It is again reported that gold has beeu discovered in this province. The Timaru Herald of Wednesday, says :—Our Temuka correspondent says—l have been shown a sample of rough gold, weighing one aud a-half grains, which has been tested, and valued as worth £3 10s per ounce. Mr H. Pratt, of this town, on Monday morning, when cleaning the inside of a goose, found in the gizzard a number of small pieces of gold, weighing as above. The largest piece. 1 should say, weighs about three-quarters of a grain, and the other pieces are of various sizes : the whole show signs of

the action of water, there being no sharp edges. There must evidently be gold in the district, and payable, from the size of the samples. The same journal also says : — There is a party of three men still working on the goldfields at the Waiho, with what

success no cue can get any information, but as they have been there for some time aud

are old diggers, it is suspected they are getting gold enough to pay tucker.

A public meeting took place at Messrs Neuleton and McDonald's woolshed, Waikuku. near Wocdend, on Tuesday evening last, in compliance with a wish of the inhabitants of that district, to have the following district proclaimed an educational

district, in accordance with the provisions of the Education Ordinance, IS7l—" Commencing at the nortu-east corner of section 865 ; thence westerly along the northern boundaries of the said section, and section 1126 to the north-west corner of section 1126; thence southerly to the north-east corner of section 1241; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said section to the north-west corner of said section ; thence in a northerly and north-easterly direction along the road forming the western and north-western boundaries of sections 3064. 4718, and 3933, to the south-east corner of section 1270 ; thence northerly along the eastern boundary of said section to the north-east corner of said section : thence westerly along the northern boundary of the said section to the south-east corner of section 1785 ; thence northerly along the eastern boundary of said section to the south bank of the River Ashley ; thence easterly along the southern bank of the said river where it meets the sea ; and thence southerly along the coast to a point due east of the starting point; and thence from that point in a straight line to the said starting point." From the interest taken in the matter, there was a very numerous attendance. Mr Thomas Wilson was voted to the chair. J. P. Restell, Esq., Inspector of Schools, on behalf of the Board, explained the various provisions of the Education Ordinance. It was then proposed and carried that the district described be constituted an educational district, to which proposition there were only two dissentients. A committee of Messrs T. Wilson, W. Morris, J. Skivington, J. F. Nettleton, P. Mahar, Leggett, T.Grevis, lvens, and Ayres, were then elected. Messrs Smith and A.Ellis were elected auditors. It was decided to proceed at once with the erection of a district school, for which Mr Wilson (the chairman of the meeting) has kindly given a suitable site of land.

A largely attended meeting of the German re.-idents of Christchurch interested in the establishment of a German church, took place at Barrett's hotel on Tuesday evening Mr J. G. Ruddenklau in the chair. The principal business before the meeting was the consideration of a letter from the Rev. Mr Meyer, in which the rev. gentleman intimated that he was unable to accept the position of pastor to the church. After some discussion a committee was appointed to take immediate steps to obtain a pastor from Germany to take charge of the church. We may mention in connection with this subject that the sum of over £500 has been subscribed by the German residents of Christchurch exclusive of the £230 voted by the Provincial Council, a fact which reflects the highest possible credit upon the unwearied exertions and liberality of our German fellow citizens. A section of land at the corner of Worcester and Montreal streets, near the Museum, has been obtained for the site of the church, and a very handsome building designed, which when carried out will be a credit alike to the locality in which it is situate, and also to the city in general. The erection of the church will be proceeded with in a few weeks, so soon as the plans are agreed upon, and it is expected that a pastor from one of the German Universities will arrive in Canterbury within six months from this date. In view of the importation under the General Government scheme of immigration of a large number of German immigrants, this provision for their spiritual welfare is highly creditable to the German residents here.

We yesterday inspected the plans recently prepared for the alterations of the Theatre Royal, under the lesseeship of Mr John Baylee, who intends initiating his accession by a series of long wanted and necessary improvements, which will render the theatre an ornament to that portion of the city. Iv front of the present building—the unsightly projection of the dress-circle staircase being removed —a nicely arranged front will be erected, comprising a parapet with entrances arranr-ed, so as to separate most entirely the three classes of patrons to the Theatre. In this part there will be four circular headed windows, giving light to the various rooms which are described below. Above this parapet rises a handsome and showy front, with an ornament capping the whole, and below this will be an emblazoned scroll work on which the name of the Theatre will be painted. This part when completed will be exceedingly handsome and in very good taste. Commencing down stairs, we come first to the dress circle entrance, which is situate at the end of the building nearest the Criterion hotel. On going in at the one side will be a ticket office for the dress circle only, and on the same side a large and commodious cloak room for the use of ladies patronising the dress circle, which is lighted by the windows from the street before referred to. Passing on beyond the ticket office and cloak room we ascend a staircase, broad and commodious, affording plenty of room for ingress and egress, which going up to the height of the present windows, reaches a landing, and from this, entrance to the dress circle is gained by means of a pair of folding doors so constructed as to prevent any draught coming into those seated in the circle. In the dress circle itself the present inconvenient and incommodious chairs will be removed, and circular benches cushioned, and with sweep backs, each seat being divided off with arms, will be substituted. The seating will be for 200 persons, but on an emergency fifty or sixty more can be accommodated, by means of extra seating put down. The pit entrance will be through two large folding doors in the centre, and on each side is a ticket office, one side being for the stalls, aud the other for the pit. Entering the auditorium we may note that the floor will be raised on a gradually ascending scale from the stage towards the back of the pit, thus affording a full view to all, the rise being so proportioned that the range of vision of the line of seats behind each other will be over the heads of the one immediately in front of them. The present passage down the centre of the pit will be done away with, and passages on each side substituted, the seats also being cushioned and gas lamps supplied at the back of the pit to remedy the darkness atjpresent so prevalent there. As will be noticed from the foregoing description the entrance to the pit is completely isolated from any of the others. The stalls entrance is the farthest eastward nearest to the Shakspeare hotel, and will be nearly upon the site of the present stage door. From this through alargedoor.eutrauee to t'.e stalls will be joined by a covered way leading up to very nearly the present dressingroom door, where a stall entrance will be made on the eastern side of the building. Iv the interior we may meutioi that it is

intended to raise the present ceiling three feet and to cove in the sides, having a dome iv the centre in which will be the sunlight and improved ventilators. The private boxes will be carried out at a sharper angle, thus giving more room, and will also be pannelled up to the ceiling, having four pilasters in front, and being lighted exclusive of the sunlight, thus completely ensuring privacy, and adding greatly to their comfort. The act drop aud scenery will be new. and the footlights arranged on the patent float principle, so as not to interfere with a complete view of the stage, which will also be further attained by the reduction of the height of the orchestra. The stage, under the able superintendence of Mr Rose, will be refitted after the latest London model, and both before and behind the curtain every effort will be made for the comfort of both audience and professionals. Mr Baylee is, we understand, in communication with two gentlemen of high professional standing in Australia for the renting of the theatre for a season, Mr Baylee stipulating that the season, which is to be divided into two, shall not exceed eight mouths, and that all the latest novelties shall be produced here as soon as possible. The alterations will cost close on £500, and will take about two months to finish. We hope that the spirited lessee will reap that reward which his enterprise so richly deserves.

Several specimens of a second crop of strawberries have been exhibited lately in Christchurch. As another proof of the mildness of the weather during the past autumn, we may mention that an apple tree in Mr J. L. Wilson's garden at St. Albans, has a second crop of fruit upon it.

Last evening, His Worship the Mayor, accompanied by Councillors Bishop, Jones, Calvert, aud the City Surveyor, made a tour of inspection, for the purpose of comparing the illuminating power of the new lamps recently erected in various parts of the city with the old ones. The improvements in the construction of the new lamps are of a twofold character; the base of the interior of the outer lamp being contracted throsvs less shadow around the immediate vicinity than those made on the old principle, and the upper part of the lamp being made of tin instead of glass has a greater reflecting power than formerly, besides being incapable of being broken. The new burners likewise are on a different principle, being psrforated so as to cause a current of air to flow over the flame, and thus creating a greater illuminating power. On comparing the different degrees of illumination between the new and old lamps it was found that one of the latter cast a shadow to the distance of fifteen feet from the lamp post; one of the new burners placed in an old exterior lamp threw a shade half the distance of the old one, and with about the same illuminating power around, while the new burner placed in the new exterior lamp cast considerably less shade immediately in its vicinity, but the light diffused to a distance was of the same intensity as the old lamps. The following are the situations of the new lamps, and others will from time to time be added, as the city funds will admit of the outlay :—One at the corner of Gloucester and Manchester streets ; one at the North town belt in Durham street; one at the intersection of Chester and Barbadoes streets; one at the junction of Colombo and St. Asaph streets ; one in Antigua street on the South town belt, and one in Hereford street on the East town belt. The members of the Lighting Committee were satisfied with the result of their experimental tour as far as it went, but it is obvious that there is yet room for considerable improvement in the construction of the public kerosene lamps, until the gas is laid down in the outskirts of the city.

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF TEE DAY., Press, Volume XIX, Issue 2844, 13 June 1872

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2,673

NEWS OF TEE DAY. Press, Volume XIX, Issue 2844, 13 June 1872

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