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NEWS OF THE DAY.

His Honor the Judge will sit in Chambers at 11 a.m. this day.

The Christchurch Musical Society will resume practice this evening, Mr Landergan having returned from his visit to Kelson. We understand that Handel's "Judas Maccabeus " "will be put in rehearsal. The adjourned inquest, touching the death of Isabella Thompson, will be resumed at Waltham to-day at two p.m., before J. W. S. Coward, Esq., coroner. The inquest was adjourned in order to procure evidence from the Hurunui, and this being now forthcoming the investigation will take place. The arbitration case at Kai.apoi, Keetley v. the General Government, still drags its slow length along. Yesterday the examination cf the witnesses for J .he defence finished, and the sitting is now adjourned until Monday next, when the plaintiff will open his rebutting case, and address the Court. We hear that in a few mouths' time a dramatic performance will be given in aid of the funds of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. The piece performed will be Sir Walter Scott's " Ivanhoe," dramatised by one of the members of the society. The performance will take place in one of the large halls in the city.

We understand that Mr George Hart has consented to stand as a candidate to represent the Coleridge district in the General Assembly.

The Mccdelssohn Society give a concert on Friday ne:;t in the new Oddfellows' Hail, when Spohr's exquisitely grand oratorio cf 11 The Last Judgment " will be given, t'.getlier with some miscellaneous pieces. TLe oratorio will be performed on this occasion for the first time in Chrisichurch. and from all we can hear of rehearsals, it i≤ likely to be a success.

The Orchestral Society, which has unobtrusively but steadily been doing good work for the past few mouths, intend giving a concert of orchestral and vocal music in a few weeks at the new Oddfellows' Hall, L'chiield street. From the rehearsals wbich have already taken place we augur very favorably of the debut of this, the latest formed of our musical societies. A private match for a Whitworth rifle was fired ut the Heathcote range, yesterday afternoon, in which several of the colonial repre~ seutatives competed. The ranges were 400, 500, and 600 yards, five ehots at each, and the prize was won by Mr Buchanan, with a score of 67. The following were the next highest scorers : Brown, 66 ; McDonald, 65 ; Dixon, 63 ; Lean, 63 ; Blatch, 63; Christie, 61 ; Wilson, 60 ; Barnes, 59 ; Marshall, 59. The Tutekawa Native meeting house at Tuahiwi, near Kaiapoi, narrowely escaped being burned to the ground on Sunday afternoon, while the Maoris were on their way to prayers. At about half-past four smoke was seen issuing from the back part of the building, but the fire was happily extinguished before any serious damage was done, by bucketsful of water. Those present worked very determined, for the whole place must have been consumed. The origin of the fire is not known. • The Timaru Gazette reports : —The Drillshed at Temuka is nearly completed, and is really a prominent feature in the township. The supporters of the Mechanics' Institute are to have a meeting shortly, and there is no doubt that the reading-room and libraryi as agreed upon at t the last meeting, will be commenced, as several subscriptions, together with the site, have already beeu obtained. The hall of the Volunteers will answer every purpose for public amusements &c, but a library aud reading-room has long been wanted.

At the meeting of the Christchurch Mutual Improvement Association held last Friday evening, an essay on Milton, by Mr Armitage, was read by the Rev. Mr Martin, the writer being preventedby a cold from attending. The paper was very well written, and treated of the life, works, genius, and theology of the poet. An interesting discussion followed on the several points raised by the essayist. As the remarks had been prolonged beyond the usual time for closing, it was resolved that in future the meetings close punctually at half-past nine. Some good subjects have been undertaken by members, and the association bids fair to continue its career of usefulness. A new feature has been introduced in the shape of short competitive essays by juniors for the reading nights, and next Friday evening will be an occasion of the kind.

On Sunday evening a meeting was held in the Catholic schoolroom for the purpose of presenting Mr F. Shanley with an address on the occasion of his leaving the province for the purpose of settling in Napier. The Rev. Ecuyer presided, and called on the secretary, Mr E. O'Connor, to read the address. Father Ecuyer then presented it in the name of the Society in a few appropriate words. He expressed the sorrow he felt at losing Mr Shanley as a member of the Society and a member of the church. He had done a good deal for the Society, and as a private individual had set a very edifying example before the congregation. Mr Baker was next called on to address the meeting. He expressed a hope that they might again have the pleasure of seeing Mr Shanley amoug them. That gentleman had said that he intended to do his best to establish a societj in Napier, and if he was successful they would in all probability see him here again as the first delegate. After a few remarks from Mr O'Connell, Mr Shanley returned thanks in suitable terms, and the meeting separated.

The volunteer representatives take their departure respectively North and Sontli today and to-morrow. The latter leave by the Maori to-day, and the foimer will probably get away by the Wellington tomorrow. There is a slight feeling of dissatisfaction amongst the representatives, we believe, at their treatment whilst in Canterbury; but it has been more the fault of those immediately concerned with them than the general body of the people, who were, we feel certain, only too ready and willing to uphold that character for hospitality which Canterbury has so deservedly gained in other respects. But the truth must be told, and the fact is that one or two of our Canterbury Volunteer officers have made themselves exceedingly obnoxious during the stay of the representatives—a fact which is the more to be regretted as it not only reflects upon them individually but also upon us as a whole, a position we must decidedly repudiate, so far as the great bulk of the residents of the province is concerned. We hope that should another occasion of a similar kind take place, that there will be a little more hospitality shown to our visitors.

The gentlemen who have represented the press at the late rifle meeting, have addressed the following letter to Mr F. Stevens. It bears the signatures of all the members of the press who were engaged in reporting the meeting :—Christchurch, April 15, IS72.—F. Stevens, Esq., Staff Secretary. Dear Sir, — We cannot allow the Colonial Rifle Meeting to terminate without conveying to you our sense of the obligation we are under for the courtesy and assistance which, you have, throughout the meeting, extended to us as the representatives of the press of the colony. We feel that this assistance was often given, this courtesy ofteu shown at times and under circumstances which must have been peculiarly trying to your temper, but in applying to you we have at all times been sure of receiving full information, given in the most courteous manner. Had it not been for your kindness and willingness to assist us at whatever inconvenience to yourself. we should have been quite unable to have placed the public in possession of that full, early, and reliable information regarding the events of the meeting which we have, with your assist-

ance, been fortunate euough to supply. We beg therefore that you will accept our most heariy thanks, and if on any future occasion we are called upon to represent the press at the Colonial Rifle Meeting, we shall undertake the duty with confidence and pleasure, if .assured that we shall find you discharging the duties of staff secretary. We are, ifcc."

Mr Seed's mission to the Navigator group, says the Auckland Herald, would appear to clave been fruitless, as the following extract Liom the Ilouolulii Advertiser, March lti, will show : —The following is the report from the Uuited States steamer Naragausult. Commander 11. W. Meade, which sailed from Honolulu January 27. arriving at PoDga February 14, in eighteen days under canvas, officers and crew all well. On the 17th, the Maunga, or high chief, made a treaty with Captain Ivlcade, granting to the United States of America the exclusive right to the harbor of Ponga Ponga (the finest in the South Pacific), as a coaling or navp.l station. On the Ist of March the Samoan flag was hoisted on shore and saluted with 15 guns from the Naragansett, Captain Meade ordering two companies of his men, with their officers, on shore, drawn up in line in front of the flag. The Naragansett visited the island of Apia, on the 18th of February, and detained the brig Leonora, W. H. Hayes, master, on suspicion of cruising about in an unlawfully armed vessel, levying contributions on the native chiefs among the Islands, but there being no evidence to sustain the charge, Hayes was released after three and a-half days' detention on board the Naragansett. On the 23rd of February, the Naragansett returned to Ponga Ponga to complete the survey of the bay. She was to sail from Ponga Ponga on the 19th of March, for South American ports. On the sth of March, the high chief was to have given a native dance, and had invited the officers of the Naragansett to witness it. The Americans have forestalled the British, in taking possession of Ponga Ponga, for in reality the consent of the islanders in such a case is quite a secondary consideration. Te Maunga must have felt immensely flattered by the American war ship saluting the Samoan flag; but we doubt not he was much more strongly impressed by the two companies of armed men, which Captain Meade sent ashore to take " line in front of the flag." No wonder that the "high chief" at Ponga Ponga " made a treaty with Captain Meade, granting to the United States of America the exclusive right to the harbor of Ponga Ponga (the finest in the South Pacific) as a coaling or naval station." Poor Mr Seed, he was permitted to shake hands with the " high chief," but he wanted the persuasive arguments which Captain Meade employed to induce his chiefship to make a treaty. We are glad, however, that any civilised power has selected this harbor as a naval station. The islanders will be decided gainers by the presence of Americans. Commercial intercourse with the islands of the South Pacific will likewise increase.

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY., Press, Volume XIX, Issue 2794, 16 April 1872

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1,818

NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume XIX, Issue 2794, 16 April 1872

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