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TEA MEETING AT BROADFIELDS.

A tea meeting was held at Broadfields on Tuesday night for the purpose of bidding farewell to Mr XHyde, who has been chairman since the establishment of the school, and also to inaugurate the completion of the school building.

The room was crowded, for Mr Glyde was widely known, and what is more, widely respected, and so in spite of the terribly mnddy roads, traps and drays, and horsemen and pedestrians, hastened from miles round to pay him their tribute of respect. No man in these districts has done more to forward the cause of education than Mr Glyde;- in fact, the Springston and Broadfields schools almost owe their existence to him, and it mnst be gratifying to him on the eve of his departure to find people of all denominations laying aside their petty differences, eu4 . waiting to do tom-koiwr.

Th~e"tea tables were dames Royd, Early, Aiken. Can , , Granger, and Mills, and we need hardly say groaned under the sweet things provided. After tea the schoolroom was got ready for speaking, and the Rev Mr Neal took the chair, Mr Jno. Tosswill who was to have done so. being unavoidably absent. The evening was commenced by the singing of a glee—" Hail Smiling Morn," which was nicely rendered by Mrs White, and Messrs Helms and Dunn.

The Rev Chairman then called upon Mr Lloyd to present to Mr Glyde a very handsome illuminated address, beautifully framed, a gift from his fellow committeemen and the schoolmaster, Mr Cotton. The following is the inscription:—"To S. D. Glyde, Esq. Dear Sir—Wβ the undersigned, members of the School Committee, beg to express our united thanks for the very "efficient manner in which you have discharged your duties as chairman since the formation of the district, and deeply regret your departure from among us. With kind regards for your future welfare—We are, dear sir, yours (signed) W. W. Lloyd, W. Craighead, G. Ward, P. Saxton, M. Granger, and John Cotton (schoolmaster)."

Mr LαWRY was then called upon to present a very handsome annotated paragraph Bible, a gift from the children attending the Broadfields and Springston schools. On the fly-leaf of the Bible was the following address : —" Presented to S. D. Glyde, Esq., by the children of Broadfinldeand Springston districts, as a token of gratitude for services rendered in assisting to establish their schools."

Mr Glyde then returned thanks to the donors in a short but touching speech, beggiug them to remember hie last words, and to use their best endeavours to educate their children, cautioning them that those very children might become the rulers of New Zealand, and warning them of the terrible effects of uneducated power. He said he was a thorough democrat, but that be wonld rather /be ruled by an educated despot than by uneducated masses. He also warned them not to admit of clerical interference in the schools. The masters, before t they were appointed, had to undergo a severe examination as to their Bible kuow-' ledge, and were quite compelent to impart all the religious instruction required in aj secular school, and be had always found that admitting a minister, never mind to what denomination he belonged,,was likely to cause dissension. In conclusion he said he was a poor man, but that if they were to ask him which he should like best, £50 or what they had given him,lie should certainly choose their present, as it showed that he had gained their affection and esteem.

Mr Davis then sung, " I cannot sing the old songs," very nicely.

-■Mr Perriman was then called upon to give some account of the country to which Mr Glyde is going (Adelaide), which he did in a short but humorous spqech.

Mr Shinab Helms then sung "Gentle words."

Mr W. Lawby then spoke, reviewing all that Mr Glyde has done, and bidding him an affectionate farewell. :

A song by Mr White, "Never forget," wa deservedly encored, and was responded to bye the singing of " Somebody's courting somebody;" i

A reading by Mr Jacobson, " High-water mark ;" a song by Messrs Davis and Tanner, "Poor blind boy," and a speech from Mr Cotton, brought a very enjoyable evening to a close.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18710706.2.15

Bibliographic details

TEA MEETING AT BROADFIELDS., Press, Volume XVIII, Issue 2552, 6 July 1871

Word Count
700

TEA MEETING AT BROADFIELDS. Press, Volume XVIII, Issue 2552, 6 July 1871

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