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DINNER TO MR. S. D. GLYDE.

A complimentary dinner by the inhabitants of Prebbleton and neighbourhood, to Mr S. D. Glyde, was given last evening at the hotel, Prebbleton, on the occasion of his leafing the province. There were about sixty persons present,. including several gentlemen from Christchurchl The dinner •was served up in! the best style by Host Helms, and everything passed off in the most successful manner.

Mr A. C. Knight, the member for the district, took the chair, and the Eev W. E. Paige, the vice-chair.

After the cloth had been removed, the usual loyal toasts were given by the chairman, and received enthuiastically. Song—Mr F. Martin.

The Chaibman next proposed the health of "his Excellency the Governor, and the Government of New Zealand." ' He felt sure that the toast would be received with the greatest favor, inasmuch as the present Government had propounded the greatest, if not the only colonising scheme, which, if carried out- in "its integrity, would be the making of New Zealand. . He felt certain that the toast would be received with the greatest enthusiasim."

■The "toast was drunk with enthusiasm. Song—Mr A. Duncan, "When the kye comes hame."

The Chairman next proposed the "Army, Navy, and Volunteers," coupled with the names of Captain Brett and Lieut. Strouts, which was responded to by those gentlemen.

Song—rLieut. Strouts, "Row,/.row, homeward we steer."

The Chaibman next proposed " His Honor the Superintendent and the Executive." He coupled them together without any disrespect to his Honor, as he knew they would receive them very heartily. The .present Executive were certainly very popular, and and without entering into politics he would simply say that he trusted his Honor would see his way to work with the Executive; and also see that he must respect the wishes of the poeple of the province. This office must be filled by a gentleman who would work with the Executive and respect the voice of the people, and be hoped it would continue to be filled by one who would do so. - Song—Mr Grey, "The Irish Jaunting Car.". ..

Mr Oxuviek proposed " The Health of the General Assembly and the Provincial Council." He regretted that the toast had not fallen into abler hands. They must bear ia mind that he was not in a position to give expression to hie political opinions. He had the strongest sympathy for both bodies ; the one was a necessity, and the other was growing into something of the past. [Laughter and cheers*] They were looking forward to great things at the hands of the next session i of the. General Assembly, and he believed that the whole future of New: Zealand rested , on their action at next session. He hoped j that every member would go to the Assembly free from all party motives and pledged to his utmost to represent the trne interests of the province. There was a great future before them if that future were carefully watched over by those to whom they had delegated their interests.. There was no province in New Zealand so flourishing as Canterbury, and it could hold its own against all the others, if their representatives attended to their true interests. As a non-politician, lie hoped that their interests were placed in xhe hands of men who would watch over such. With regard to the Provincial Council, he looked upon it as a sort of nursery for the Parliament of New Zealand, and he wished that all those whom he saw around him that evening would look upon the matter in that light; and he had no: doubt that there were many there who, if, they only put their ehoulders to the wheel, Vould leave their dark behind them if they chose to aspire to a seat in the Council. He believed' that Canterbury was suffering from great apathy .and indifference in that respect. ■would look forward to the time wherTthey should represent their various districts in the Assemblies of the colonies. They must , not waste their energies on Road Boards, for .-.if- they did so they would see their.Councils ignored and set aside. The Council had .dene a great deal hitherto, and if xig"htly handled it would dp a great deal still. He believed ihe only reason it had not done so was as a friend of hie .had s&id*thatthe Provincial Councils were "too big , for their boots." (Hear, hear.) If they looked upon themselves as purely municipal institutions be believed that no effort would be made to put them down. He thought thai the district had reason to congratulate itself oh the able manner in which it was represented, and he would call.on their respected member, Mr Knight, to respond to the toaet. Song —Mr Steadman — " Old English Melodies."

Mr. KNIGHT (the chairman) in response to the toast, said he /was Sony that there was no mezaber of the General Assembly present to reply to the toast. He had no doubt that the next Bes.-ion of the Assembly would be one of the toe*t important ever hnld, and he wgnld say farther that the Provincial Council might strengthen the hands of the Assembly VsL." very much. He W3S happy that they:were ptnng to have the privilege of meeting, soon. \Ssaa> heat.}. With re^rdto.ti^wisbex-

'pressed by~Mr Ollmer that-he-fthe •Chair--man) might-aspire fto the Government benches, he would saythat he would always try "to keep" clear of them." [Laughter.] They were a bed of thorns. [Renewed laughter.] Aβ regarded provincial institutions, they ibad done good, 5 and might I continue to do still more in the future. jAs far as they could see, however, they required remodelling and simplifying as much" as possible. For instance the Superintendent should have a seat in the Council., .His..powers were such that he could, if he chose, set at defiance the wishes of the people although that had never been done in the Province until lately, but still that showed them, however, that the office might be abused. It was said that provincial institutions-were expensive, but heconld not agree with'such an assertion : they could not be more economically managed than at present. He begged to thank them heartily for the mariner in which, they had responded to the toast.

Song, Mr Goodwin, 'INever give up." Mt SfEATttIAN proposed "The health of the Clergy of New Zealand." Without them they would soon go to the wall. One thing to be said waiTthat'lhe people of Canterbury did not forget tne'mazims of their ancestors. He beg to couple with the toast the name of the Rev. Mr Paige.

Song, Mr Rossiteif—" The Slave Ship." Rev. Mr" Paige responded, and thanked the company for the kind manner in which the toast was received. He was glad to see that the clergy of Canterbury did not hold themselves aloof from the social gatherings that occasionally took place. He expressed his gratification that his lines were cast in such pleasant places, and he would wish to see other congregations behave themselves equally harmoniously.

Song, the Chairman-^—* The Schoolboy."

The Chairman next proposed the toast of the evening—the health of their worthy guest, Mr S. D. Glyde. [Loud cheers.] He regretted that the task of doing so had notfallen into abler hands. They were all met there that evening to bid him "Good bye." It was a word which he abominated, although they.-had.ta use it occasionally. There was no more fitting time than the present to do so. They all knew Mr Glyde intimately, and they could, not tell how much they should miss him. He went at all events to a drierclimate—[laughter]—and they all hoped that hisntmost expectations would be realised. [Cheers'.] He had served the Springs and Lincoln Eoad Boards for a period of seven years in the capacity of, surveyor and clerk, and had given great satisfaction. He had also taken a lively interest in all matters affecting the well-beingf of the whole neighborhood, and had worked with a will in everything, and in a most satisfactory manner. [Hear, hear.]" They would miss him also in another way, for he would ask them to whom did the laboring manj the contractor, the farmer, and their member in the Provincial Council go to for advice, but to Mr Glyde.. [Cheers.] It was impossible for them to tell how much they should miss him. He could also name to them a most happy trait of his character, in that he was able to gather around him such a large number of friends without a single enemy—[cheers]; and he hoped they would try to imitate his example. On the part of the residents of the' Lincoln and Springs district, he had now to ask Mr Glyde's acceptance of this trifle as a token of their regard for him. He only hoped he } would live long enough to see it worn out. i The presentation consisted of a very handsome clock,bearing the following inscription, on a silver plate:—" Presented to Mr S. D. Glyde as a token of regard for the valuable services rendered to the settlers of the Lincoln ?larid Springs' district, Canterbury,' New Zealand." He had also to ask his acceptance of another small token of their esteem —a tankard which bore also the same inscription. They were aware when they were thinking of presenting himjwith those testimonials, that it was not their value which would enhance them in his eyes. He would now ask them to drink his health in champagne with all the honors. [Loud cheering.] .7- ••.■•■■ The cup having been filled with champagne was then sent round the table. Song—Mr Duncan—"The Brave Old Oak." Mr Glyde, on rising to respond to the toast, was received with great enthusiasm. He said he begged .to thank them most heartily for presenting him with such valuable testimonials, and for the manner in which they had spoken of him. From the bottom of his heart he begged to thank them most heartily, and if he failed to giverexpression to his feelings, they must put it down to his inability to do so fitly and properly. He had longago felt, that the manner in' which he had been received and treated in the district left him indebted in a way which he could never hope to repay. [Cheers.] He had received from every one present the utmost kindness and cordiality, although he thought they must see that his position was one which must occasionally bring him into collision with them. He had,- however, to thank them for the charitable way in which they had received him, otherwise his position would have been a very rough one. [Cheers.] He had occasionally shut his eyes to many things which came under his notice, because he did not think that a man in his ppsition should strive to carry out the I strict letter of the law on all occasions, but should so act as to be able to see the law carried into effect for the greatest good of I all concerned. [Cheers.] There was hardly one in the district whose hospitality he had not to acknowledge, and they might be sure it was no slight matter for him to part with so many friends. When he came there seven years ago, he found that district in a very different position to what it was now in, and he had no doubt they were beginning to see the dawn of better times. [Cheers.] Most sincerely he hoped that that was the case, and he hoped also soon to hear that Canterbury had regained her former prosperity —not the prosperity, however, of seven years ago, but one which existed on a sounder basis. And why should not that be the case? The farmers were the backbone of that prosperity, and no one else. Hitherto they had been beasts of burden, and it was to a great extent their own fault. Had he remained among them longer, he would have lent his aid to establish a farmers' club in the district. £Cheers.] They had one of the best agricultural districts in the province, and had facilities-to make it; & most ( prosperous one. Perhaps in the country be was goingto hemigbtwisli to retrace his steps and might want to come back among them again. At any rate he could never forget their kindness to him that evening, and for the past seven years. He would look upon the presents made to him that evening as a sort of credential that he had not been kicked out of the country. [Laughter.] He again thanked them most heartily, and he had yet to learn that those jjood wishes of theirs for his welfare would not be without effect with Him with whom were long life, and health and power. [Loud cheering.] J

Song—Mr J. S. Bruce. —' boys together."

•♦When we were

Mr DtWCAJ? said he had to apologise for the absence of Mr J. Anderson, who having a prior engagement was unable to be present that evening. He wished to propose the agricultural and pastoral- interests of Canterbury. It used to be the reverse, but now the agricultural interestscame first. The Abels of Canterbury were giving way to the Cains in the best sense of the term, and not in the worst. They grew more grain in Canterbury i than in the other provinces of New Zealand, and that showed that they had men here \ who were fitted in every way to take their J place as agriculturists. They all knew that Ibe had . held ; advanced-opinions on the quesfcioWof the-iand end k was now seen that others were Goming gradually round to hi* opinions. They would find that before long they-would- have agricultural meetings in places which now were barren wastes. They bad men that, evening who, like Mr Tosswill, Mr Gammack, and Mr Todd, were looked np to with reve-

iai«i

|"Tei««~"isy""tliose~~aTOTrnd-"theni. Therer | was one however of those whose name would I not go down to posterity in the manner it ishouM. He alluded to Mr Gammack. (Laughter.) He could leave no name behind him, and he hoped if a farmers' club were I established that an agitation would begot up to impose a bachelors' tax. He begged toconnlewith the toast the names of Mr Tosswill, Mr Gammack, and Mr Todd. The toast was drunk with the usual honors. Mr Tosswii/L said he felt overwhelmed at the enthusiastic manner in which the .toast had been drunk. He thought it showed that the agricultural and commercial interests were closely allied, when they saw Mr Duncan come from Christchurch to do honor to Mr Glyde. He was also glad that the pastoral interest was included in tihe toast. It had done good in the past, but he of course could not say that it must not give way to that of the fanner. There was no doabt that the next session of the Provincial Council would affect the interests of the fanners to a great extent. There was no doubt they were, as was expressed by a previous speaker, "beasts of burden." He begged to thank them for coupling his name with the toast. i

Mr Gammaok returned thanks for the manner in which the toast had been drunk, though, no doubt, the proposer had censured him considerably. [Cheers.] No other province could vie with Canterbury in agricultural produce. In Auckland. 130 miles from the chief town, the horse was fed on Canterbury oats, and other produce consumed he found was also from Canterbury. That was owing to the superior manner in which the Canterbury farmers conducted their agricultural operations.

Song—Mr- Gillingbam.

Mr J. G. Murray proposed the health of their member in the Provincial Council, Mr Knight. No one could say that he had not acted most conscientiously throughout hie whole career. He hoped yet to see him in tha Assembly as their member. [Cheers.] Mr Knight thanked them very sincerely for the manner in which they had drunk his health. He had never tried to satisfy the views of all his constituents, but he believed he had satisfied the majority of them. He tried to do his duty to the whole province. [Cheers.] Song—Mr Murray.

Mr Glyde proposed the health of the " Members of the Road Board." The chairman, under whom he had served, had exercised great discretion, in the supervision of their districts, and that without any great purloining of the moneys of the province. He begged to couple with the toast the names of Mr J. Tosswill and Mr Goodwin.

Song—Mr Grey.

Mr Tosswill returned thanks. He wished to take this opportunity of saying how much the road boards and the whole country were indebted to Mr Glyde for the services he had Tendered, thereby making his duties so much the lighter.. [Cheers.] Mr Goodwin also returned thanks, and paid high tribute to Mr Glyde for the services rendered.

The remaining toasts proposed were "The Visitors," responded to by Mr Ollivier ; and " The Press," responded to by Mr Smithr The health of the chairman was then proposed, and the meeting broke up before 12 o'clock, after having spent a most pleasant evening.

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Bibliographic details

DINNER TO MR. S. D. GLYDE., Press, Volume XVIII, Issue 2552, 6 July 1871

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DINNER TO MR. S. D. GLYDE. Press, Volume XVIII, Issue 2552, 6 July 1871

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