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The Press. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1867.

Our attention has been drawn by one or two correspondents to the advertised charges on wool carried on the Great Southern and Christchurch and Lyttelton Eaihvays, which they declare to be in excess of the maximum rate allowed by the Railway Tolls and Management Ordinance. On looking into the Ordinance, and comparing the published scale of charges with that given in the schedule, we are at a loss to understand how Messrs. Holmes and Co. contrive to charge 9s 6d a bale for wool conveyed from Selwyn station to the ship's side in Lyttelton harbour. According to the Ordinance the maximum toll on wool for through carriage for both lines is 6s per bale ; and adding to that wharfage dues at the rate of 2s 6d a ton —or 7kl for a bale of wool not exceeding 5 cwt. —wq have a total of only 6s 7%&. Even taking the separate tolls payable on the two lines, a bale of wool of 5 cwt. would only have to pay 3s lOd from the Selwyn to Christchurch (assuming the distance to be, as appears from the charge on coals for the same distance, twenty-three miles), and from thence to Lyttelton —eight miles at 4d per mile —2s Sd, making with the addition as before of for wharfage dues 7s in all. Now instead of 6s 7id, the toll prescribed by the Ordinance for through carriage, Messrs. Holmes and Co. are charging 9s 6d. What then is the extra 2s lOki for ? Surely not for lighterage. And by what authority is it imposed ? The question is one of considerable imoortance both to them and to the public, for as it is only under the authority of this Ordinance that they can levy any

tolls at all, so they cannot, go beyond the maximum rate allowed, and if any one has paid more he can recover the balance from them.

We notice some slips in the wording of the schedule attached to the Ordinance. On the Great Southern Kailway, for example, coals are charged 3s per ton " under five miles," and Sd per ton per mile " above that distance and under ten miles." But what if they are carried exactly five miles, neither under nor above ? The words should have been, "five miles or under." So again in fixing the charge for the second five miles the words should have been, " not exceeding ten miles," for the tenth mile is evidently meant to be included, though in reality it is expressly excluded. Again, on the Lyttelton and Christchurch line wool is charged 4d per mile for a bale not exceeding 5 cwt., and, if it does exceed that weight, 2d per cwt. or fraction of a owt. extra. But on the Great Southern Railway the charge is simply " 2d a mile per bale, of weight not exceeding 5 cwt." What then is to be done with a bale that does exceed ? What use is there in mentioning a particular limit and saying nothing of what is to be done if that limit is exceeded? As it is, the charge] specified in the Ordinance is confined to bales of a certain weight, while the lessees of the line are not authorized to charge an extra price for extra weight. These oversights indicate some hurry and want of attention in preparing the Act, which in a business matter of so much importance should have been carefully avoided.

Funeral op Me. J. Bhutan. —The funeral of Mr Joseph Brittan took place on Saturday afternoon. He was buried in -the churchyard of Avonside, in which parish he has resided, we believe, ever since he came to Canterbury. The funeral was very quietly conducted, hut was attended by a large number of gentlemen from Christchurch and the neighbourhood, desirous of doing honour to the memory of one who during his lifetime had won general esteem. Among others were the Dean of Christchurch, the Rev. Canon Wilson, his Honour the Superintendent, Messrs. C. C. •Bowen, Harman, Hamilton, C. Wilson, Stevens, Dr. Barker, Dr. Parkerson, &c. It had been hoped that Mr Rolleston would have been able to be present, and Mr FitzGerald had also expressed his intention of accompanying Mr Rolleston from Wellington to attend the funeral, but unfortunately there was no steamer from Wellington within such time as the ceremony could be deferred. Mr Brittan, though not one of the Canterbury pilgrime» was among the very early settlers, and has taken a prominent part in the affairs of the province. He came out in the William Hyde, early in the year 1852. Soon after his arrival he became engaged in local politics, obtained a seat in the Provincial Council as member for Christchurch, and ultimately became Provincial Secretary, under Mr FitzGerald, then for the second time Superintendent. Both as a member of the Council and in his official capacity, he distinguished himself greatly. As a speaker he took very high rank, possessing a fluency and force of expression, a power of lucid statement, and a readiness in debate, which with one or two exceptions have never been equalled in the Council. His attention to the manifold duties belonging to the office of Provincial Secretary was unremitting, and in the discharge of public business he displayed a shrewdness and accuracy of judgment, combined with strictness of principle and a high sense of honour, which gained him the confidence 'of his colleagues and of all with whom he was brought in contact. Besides his ability as a speaker Mr. Brittan was also a practised writer and journalist. He was first editor and then for several years proprietor of the " Canterbury Standard," his able management of which no doubt materially added to his political influence. Towards tho end of 1857, on the departure of Mr FitzGerald for England, he became a candidate for the Superintendency, but was defeated by Mr Moorhouse. He subsequently withdrew for a time from public life, till the" close of 1859, when he came forward in opposition to the railway scheme which had been proposed by the new Superintendent and received with great favour by the public. This however did not serve to lessen public confidence, for in April, 1860, he received a pressing requisition, signed by men of all parties in provincial politics, to represent the Christchurch Country district in the House of Representatives; but he declined on account of his disapproval of the railway scheme which had been supported by the great majority of the constituency. In 186 LMr Brittan re-entered the Provincial Council as one of the members for Christchurch; and it i 3 worthy of remark, as evidence of the estimation in which he was generally held, that though an avowed opponent of Mr Moorhouse's Government and the popular policy, he was returned on two successive occasions at the head of the poll. Throughout the following session he took a leading part in the proceedings, especially in the famous " siding" inquiry ; but early in the next year he sustained a severe domestic calamity in the loss of his second sou, who was drowned while bathing, in consequence of which he soon after resigned his seat in the Council, and from that time took no further part in political affairs. About the middle of 1863 Mr Brittan, who had always been noted as a zealous magistrate, succeeded Mr John Hall as Resident Magistrate for Christchurch and Kaiapoi, but was compelled by a total failure of health to resign about nine months afterwards. He also at various times held several other public appointments, including that of member of the Board of Education, and was connected with most of the local institutions, but for some months before his death the gradual decay of his bodily powers compelled him to abandon all active duties.

Chicket.—The match between the Old College and Canterbury, which was to have taken place of Friday next, has been indefinitely put of? in consequence of a difficulty in getting-a team of the former side together. It is now proposed that the return match between the U.C.C.C. and the Albion Ciub .ehould be played on the Friday and Saturday,

beginning on the Friday at one o'clock. Both of these days have been decla-ed public holidays—the Government offices closing from noon on Friday and during the whole of ■Saturday, which is the Prince of Wales's birthday. We hear that all the principal merchants in the city intend to follow the example of the Government. Lyttelton Yolt/vtees Artillery.—The members of No. 2 Battery assembled at the rifle-range at Lvttelton on Saturday list, to compete again for the prize cup offered by Captain Ritchie, on certain conditions which have been already mentioned. Gunner Craigie was the successful competitor on this occasion, and is now entitled to the cup, which becomes his property in accordance with the conditions. The following are the scores : — Gunner Craigie, H ; Gunner Fowles, 40 ; Lieutenant Cuff, 38; Gunner Wells, 38; Sergeant Cummings, 35 ; Gunner Jenkins, 35J; Corporal Rich, 26 ; Gunner Bunker, 25; Sergeant-Major All wright, 23; Gunner Donaldson, 18. Boat Race.—A match took place on the Avon on Saturday afternoon between Messrs De Troy and J. Dudley, in the Nameless, and Messrs R. P. Crosbie and Heaps in the Old Black Eagle. The match was a time one, the starting point being near the boat-house, and the course" down the river as far as Mr De Troy's house and back, a distance of about five and a-half miles. Mr Crosbie won the toss, and started at exactly half-past four, the Nameless following five minutes afterwards. Going down the wind and current were both favourable, and Messrs Crosbie and Heaps gained five seconds on their opponents, hut coming back against stream and wind the better qualities of the Nameless-told, and she gradually drew ahead and passed the winning point one minute and forty-seven seconds behind the Eagle, winning the race by three minutes and thirteen seconds. The time was fifty-seven minutes. Fibe.—A fire occurred on Saturday afternoon, about three o'clock, at the corner of Durham and Salisbury streets, in the house of Samuel Hayes, a carrier. The fire when first observed was coming through the roof, near the chimney, and the alarm was immediately given. It appears that Mrs Hayes had left the house a short time before the discovery was made, leaving a good fire and fastening the door. A strong wind was blowing at the time, and the house, a four-roomed one, was very rapidly consumed, only a very small portion of furniture bring saved. The fire is supposed to have originated from the chimney having become ignited, and from the very bad manner in which it was constructed the flame communicated with the shingle roof. The Fire Brigade and police were quickly on the g r ound, but the fire was so rapid that the house was burnt before any assistance could be given by them. No. 2, the hand-engine, was made use of to .put out the smouldering debris. The house was insured for £200 in the London, Liverpool, and Globe Insurance Company, and the estimated loss is between £300 and £350.

Mr. Inspector Pkndbb.—The following is the text of the memorial to be presented today to his Honour the Superintendent, praying that the contemplated removal of Mr Inspector Pender may not be carried out. The petition has upwards of 300 signatures, many of which are those of Justices of the Peace and the principal merchants, and we believe the names of the whole of the members of the City Council will be found in the list, which is headed by the chairman, Mr W. Wilson : — t; We, the undersigned memorialists, desire to represent earnestly to your Honour the inexpediency of removing Mr Inspector Pender from Christchurch, as we believe is at present contemplated. During the long period of Mr Pender's official residence in Christchurch, notwithstanding the establishment of a goldfield in the province and a large influx of criminal population, the community has enjoyed quietness and peace, which circumstance we believe is mainly owing to the experience and vigilance of Mr Pender and the force under his control. We also believe that the presence in Christchurch of such an officer as Mr Pender continues to be a matter of urgent necessity, and we cannot but fear that his renwral /ram «i,o- immrdiiti; control of the large force now under his command mußt-result in its demoralization to a greater or lesser degree, and that consequently crime will have a greater chance of escaping punishment. In conclusion, we beg to state that we are actuated in presenting this memorial by a feeling of strong personal regard and esteem for Mr Pender, both as a man and an officer, and we believe that his present removal from Christchurch would very generally be felt a social bereavement. Your memorialists therefore pray that the contemplated removal of Mr Inspector Pender from Christchurch may be reconsidered, with a view of complying with the wishes of your memorialists." The memorial, if it does not obtain the desired object, will at all events be a very flattering record of the regard of those who have signed it for Mr Pender.

Inquest.—The inquest on the body of the unfortunate half-caste whose death we have already noticed took place at the Leithfield hotel, before Dr. Dudley, coroner for the district. Mr John Leith was chosen foreman of the jury. Charles Edwin Paget, landlord of the Leithfield hotel, deposed to having known the deceased for some time, and that he went by the name of Ned, the half-caste He had lately been living at Mr Sanderson's station, and came to the hotel on horseback late on Thursday evening. He seemed very ill with a bad cough, and complained of a pain in the chest. He went to bed soon after arriving. Witness thought he was tired from his journey. He heard him coughing all night, and when witness got up, soon after seven, he was outa'.de of the house, but after breakfast went to bed Bgain, and had some gruel. Witness sent for a doctor, and advised deceased to go by the coach to the Hospital. He appeared better after having some medicine, but his cough was very bad, and he spat blood. He said he had been ill three or'four days, and had lain out without blankets. Witness last saw him alive about noon, when he was still about the same, and thought he would be able to get to the Hospital. In about half an hour after, when witness went to him, he was dead. Dr. M. Morris said he had been sent for to see the deceased, whom he found suffering from inflammation of the lungs, and very ill. He complained of a cough, and also a pain at his chest. Witness thought he appeared quite fit to go to the Hospital. He had not the slightest doubt that death resulted from the inflammation of the lungs. Deceased said he had been ill since the previous Saturday. The jury returned a verdict" That the deceased died by the visitation of God." Inquest at Leithfield —The inquiry into the cause of death of John Anthony Crocker took plac*e at the Leithfield hotel on Friday last before C. Dudley, Esq., coroner for the district, and the following jury : — Messrs Leith (foreman), Bailie, Muir, Barclay, Trail Matthews, Lewton, White, Parker, Sliaw, McNaught, and Mahler. Ths first witness examined was James Rowc, who deposed as follows —I am a carpenter living at Christeh'irch, and acquainted witli the deceased. We wero working together at the St. Leonards station. He was a carpenter and about thirty years of age. We had finished our work and were returning to Christchurch on Tuesday morning last. I was with th.3 deceased and David Melville in a dray with one hors-\ We had to cross the Hurunui river, at which we arrived about half past seven in the morning. When we got about half-way across the horse stopped and refused to go further. Mekille, who was driving, tried to return, and in turning the dray was capsized, and threw us all three into the water. We had our tools and swags with us. I believe the same horse had previously crossed the river at the usual ford. I managed to swim to a boat moored«at the side of the river, about 100 yards off. Melville got out at the opposite side on a spit. I saw the deceased floating down the river. The boat was fastened and locked. I ran down the river side, about 300 yards, till I met two men on horseback, "who told mc that deceased had sunk, and that they could not see him. I then got the boat, and crossed over to Hastie's accommodation-house, when I changed my clothes and went with assistants to search for the body, which we found

about a mile and a-half clown the river, washed on a spit. Deceased was quite dead when found, and we took the holy to Mr ITastie'* fie had fold ;ne he was hardly able to swim. None of us had been quarrelling, or wore the worse for liq u )r The horse was drowned, and the too!-; ; iS well as the swags were 10-t The deceased expressed no fear at crossing the river. The driv?r was in mv opinion careful as to crossing.—Davi.l Melville 'said ho was a horse driver, and resided at the St. Leonar is t station. He was engaged, on Tuesday last, to drive the last witness and deceased across the TTurunui to Tlastie's accommodation-house. The horse was quiet, and had been driven by him two or three times before. He was light j loaded. One man with two horses from the station was crossing the river at the same time, and he intended to follow. When they got to the deepest part the horse stood, and refused to go. He tried to get the horse forward, and thought at" last to get it turned towards a spit, and pass the men and goods across. In doing so the dray turned over. The river was not high, but was quite fordable. He swam to the shoro. He saw the deceased going down the river, and took off his coat to run down the bank to render assistance, and saw deceased sink. Witness called to two men on the opposite bank that some one was in the river. One of them rode into the stream, but the deceased was not to be seen. He went with others to search, and found the body about two hours after, quite dead. They did all in their power to rescue the deceased. He had previously crossed the river at the sams place, when much higher. Mr Wilkin had told him that if the river was not ford able he was to take the men to the ferry ; but he considered it efficiently low to cross with safety. The jury returned a verdict that deceased was " Accidentally drowned." Race poh the Telegraph.—The Melbourne " Herald " has received some particulars of the lasjb exciting race for the telegraph wires at Sydney on the arrival of the Panama August mail. It appears that Greville and Co.'s boat by some means got entangled by the steamer's side at starting, and the "Argus" boat thus obtained an advantage of about six lengths, which, however, was reduced to two lengths before they reached the shore, although the "Argus" boat was pulled by five pairs of sculls and Greville's by only four. The two horsemen then commenced the land race, the "Argus " horse having a slight advance in the start. The odds, however, were still considered to be in favour of Greville's horse, which was the better animal of the two. In the gallop up the town the "Argus" horse fell, leaving Greville's courier in sole possession of the field. The rider of the "Argus"horse was not much hurt. Coolie Labour.—The " Cincinnati Enquirer" says : —The emigration of Chinamen to the United States is becoming a very important matter, and is attracting attention in the Eastern as well as the Southern States. We have already noted the fact that certain New England manufacturers have made arrangements to secure several thousand Chinese labourers for their factories. The Chinese can afford to work for one-half what Americans require. Southern planters are also importing Chinese from Cuba and other places to work their cotton and sugar fields, as they form more reliahle hibonrers than the blacks, and are more faithful to their contracts. But is it Bound public policy to introduce such a population in such numbers among v*, not only on account of their capacity to work cheaper than Americans, but on account of low mental and moral condition ? What effect will their introduction huve on society ? Will it bo everlasting, or the contrary ? Or is the whole thing to be regarded in the same light as would be the introduction of vast numbers of mules or other working animals ? These questions will have to be answered, and before long. A Railway in Tubeky—Tho "Times" says that there is no doubt that the Sultan's first railway journey in his own dominions was a great success. The line from Rustehuk to Varna is about: 120 miles in length, and runs through some of the finest hill and wood sopne'-y of Bulgaria. Hi 3 Highness, after a stay of two days at. Rustehuk, left that city in a train consisting of nine carriages, painted white and emblazoned with the star and crescent in white and gold. The engine was also elaborately ornamented, and was in charge •of an English driver, named Frank White. The journey occupied seven hours, as the Sultan received deputations' en route at Rasgrad, the Schumla road, and Pravadi. The embarkation at Varna was made before sunset, a stay of only three hours being made at that port. The Imperial suite of 700 persons, with their baggage, horses, &c, were conveyed to Varna in nine special trains,' and no hitch of any kind occurred during the journey. The Sultan has signified his intention of conferring the Order of the Osmanli on Mr J. Trever Barfcley, who was in immediate charge of the Imperial train, and who has been actively, engaged for many years in forwarding railway enterprise in Eastern Europe.

South Austbalia. —The report of Mr Boothby, the Government statist, dated 18th May, shows that the wheat crop of 1856 67 in South Australia has amounted to 6,561,451 bushels, an increase of 83 per cent, over the scanty produce of the preceding season, and giving an average of more than 14 bushels per acre, the largest average ever yet obtained. 457.628 acres were under wheat, 2y acres to each head of the population, and 62 per cent, of the whole 739.714 acres in tillage. There are very many districts where farming is carried on upon a large scale, and with appropriate appliances, where the yield of the wheat is from five to ten bushels more than the above average ; the average is kept down by a great portion of the land being sown with wheat for many successive years, and, being in the hands of small proprietors, receiving only the minimum of cultivation, this cereal being preferred because of its cheapness in cost of production and gathering, and often irrespective of soil cr climate. 11,723 acres were sown with barley, 3909 with oats, 2526 with potatoes. As many as 111,339 acres were sown for hay, and the aggregate produce was 147.159 tons, an increase of 66 per cent, over the previous year. The hay crop was secured in excellent condition. The average of the whole colony reached 26 cwt. to the acre, an increase of 9 cwt. over the previous season. The total area of purchased land in the occupation of freeholders or leaseholders at the end of the year 1866 was 3,424,721 acres, or 20 acres per head of the estimated population. Large areas of land wero enclosed for agricultural purposes during the year; but the very large increase shown under the head "Enclosed Land" is mainly due to the continued fencing of country devoted to sheep-pasture, especially in the South-eastern district. The total area enclosed, 4,539,089 acres, exceeds the area sold by the Crown by 1,114,368 acres, or one-third—representing, approximately, the extent of fenced runs ; while deducting the cultivated land from the total area enclosed leaves 3 799,375 acres of fenced land available for depasturage. The number of sheep is returned at 3,911,610 —an increase of 132,302 over the previous year. The numb, r of cattle continues to decrease, and has fallen to 123,820. Ten years there were in South Australia 310.460 head of great cattle, or three for each individual of the population ; at present there is but threequarters of a bea-t, and between 6000 and 7000 fat cattle have to be purchased yearly, I chiefly from the Darling runs.

Flexible Stoke.—A great geolo<sieal curiosity has just been deposited in the museum of the Hartley Institution, at Southampton, consisting of a piece of flexible stone about two feet long, seven inches wide, and more than one men in thickness, having the appearance of rough sandstone, which bends with slight pressure like a piece of india-rubber or gutta nercha of the same size. Thi3 very interesting specimen of geology has been placed in a glass case constructed for it, fitted with a lever, by touching the key of which on the outside of the case the flexibility of the stone ia shown. It was presented to the Hartley Institution by Mr Edward Cushen, from his relative, Mr R, S. Munden, who obtained it from Delhi, in the East Indies. In its natural

position the stone is said to run in thin layers in the soil in which it is found, buf is so rare

in India that it (bids a place in the museum* it Calcutta. We are informed that there h a simil ir -tone, but not so wile as the one tin br notico, in the Hrhish Mu-tuim, and another in the museum of the Seh.iol of Mine*, bn! spe -inieiis are very rarely to bs met with Although the stone has a gritty appearance iin grif or dust is thrown oil' by the motion given to it when under pressure.

The Atlantic Tklfgkapjt axdCkimiv\ls — European rogues, observes the " New Yorl Times," who have been wont to ilee hither fur safrey after the commission of extriditnbie offences, are stopped by the Atlantic telegraph from availing themselves of this country as a convenient refuge. The ocean no longer puts a barrier between the criminal and the offended law. for no matter how great the speed of tho vessel in which the fugitive takes passage the information of his guilt is conveyed in an instant across the ocean by the voiceless messenger which stretches its length from Valentia Bay to Heart's Content, and tho officers stand ready to pounce upon the rogue the moment his ship comes to anchor. The telegraph has long been made use of in the pursuit and capture of thieves, hut not till last week was that line which connects tho Old World with the New brought into requisition for such a purpose. We may now include among the benefits which tlie Atlantic cable has conferred upon tho world its assistance towards the suppression of crime Of course criminal fugitives from either hemisphere will be fewer now that this new and potent agency is at work for their apprehension, and a great deal of expense hitherto attending the examination of prisoners for extradition before our Federal Courts will in future be avoided. We may all be glad of this except tho criminals and the lawyers who havo profited by their arrest and examination. Ratlkoads and Modern Warfare.—An American paper says : —"The wonderful part which railroads play in modern warfare was first manifested in the Crimean campaign, though if, was the subsequent Italian war which brought out the fact in its astonishing significance. The Danish hostilities reiterated the les-on for Europe, and the Prussian war of 1865 crowned the commentary. Yet it is in America, after all, that steam transportation, both by land and sea, has won its greatest triumphs. Tho recently-published report of General Parsons, tho chief of rail and river transportation, exposes a marvel of achievement in his department during the war. Take, for example, the transfer of the Twenty-third Army Corps, in January, 1865, from Eastport, Mississipi, to Washingtou. Twenty thousand men, with all the corps' artillery and over a thousand animals, were carried by rail and river from the Tennessee to the Potomac, a distance of nearly 1400 miles, in the dead of winter, over rivers and mountains blocked with snow and ice, in an average time of eleven days—less than seventeen days being occupied both by advance and rear-guard—and all without the loss of life or property. Such a feat is probably unexampled in history, and it illustrates the enormous influence hereafter to be exerted by the question of transportation in war. This is but one of a numerous series of triumphs recorded in the document just quoted.' 7 New Substitute for Gold —Increased Application of Tin.—The desirability, for the welfare of Cornish tin mines, of finding some new application for tin litis frequently been pointed out'in the "Mining Journal," and it is gratifying to find that these suggestions have not failed to attract thvt attention of inventors. An ingenious American has discovered a beautiful alloy, which lias been most successfully applied as a substitute for gold; it is composed of pure opper, 100 parts ; pure tin, 17 parts; magnesia, 6 parts ; tartar of commerce, 9 parts; sal ammoniac, 3 6 parts; and quicklime, 1.6 parts. The copper ia first melted, then the lime, magnesia, sal ammoniac, and tartar are added, little at a time, and the whole is briskly stirred for about half an hour, so as to mix thoroughly, after which tin is thrown on the surface in small grains, stirring until entirely fused. The crueiblo is now rovorod, and ttie~ fusion kept up for about thirty-five minutes, when the dross is skimmed off, and the alloy found ready for use. It is quite malleable and ductile, and may be drawn, stamped, chased, beaten into powder or into leaves like gold leaf—rin all of which conditions it is not distinguishable from gold even by good judges, except by its inferior weight The alloy has already been largely applied in the. United States, and requires only to be known in Great Britain to become a general favourite. Experiments with Safety-lamps.—On Wednesday and Thursday some highly important experiments were made at the Barrirdey Gasworks by Mr Hutchinson, the manager, and Mr Wilson, steward of tho Darfield Main Colliery, for the purpose of testing the relative value of the various kinds of safety-lamps in use when exposed to a current of air and explosive gas. The experiments, which were rather extraordinary, were made in the presence of a number of colliery proprietors and viewers. For the purpose of testing the lamps a rectangular box, twelve feet long and eleven inches by four inside, was attached to the flue of the retort-house chimney; the draught being three-tenths of an inch, as indicated by tho water-gauge and by the anemometer, was found to travel at the rate of live miles an hour when regulated by a damper. Inside tho box was a glass sight-hole, opposite to which the lamp to bo tested was placed. Whco all was in readiness a stream of gas was allowed to flow into the end of the box, sufficient to surround the lamp with an explosive atmosphere. The different lamps were then tested with the following results : —The Davy lamp with no shield on the outside exploded tho gas iv six seconds, and with the shield inside the gauze in nine seconds. The Belgian lamp exploded in ten seconds, the Moza'rd in ten seconds, the small Clanny iv seven seconds, the large one in ten seconds, and the Stephenson in seventy-five seconds. Although the Stephenson is undoubtedly the best, it ] will be seen that none of tho so-called safetylamps can bo depended upon when coming in contact with a strong explosive current of firedamp and air.

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The Press. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1867., Press, Volume XII, Issue 1558, 4 November 1867

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The Press. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1867. Press, Volume XII, Issue 1558, 4 November 1867

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