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INTERPROVINCIAL CRICKET MATCH. OTAGO V. CANTERBURY.

The fourth of these matches was begun yesterday at the new ground in Hagley Park. In 1864 a team went down to Otago, and was rather badly beaten, but in the uext season, when Otago returned the visit, Canterbury returned the compliment, though a closer mutch was played. Last season the victory again lay with our neighbors, so that they have been successful in two out of matches. The morning was at first rather cloudy, but as the clay wore on the sun shone out, and dispersed the clouds ; but a gentle sea-breeze was blowing all through the earlier part of the day, so that the heat was not oppressive. In the morning there were but few spectators on the ground, but towards the afternoon a great many came up to see the finish of the first day's play. Mr Campbell was umpire for Otago, and Dawe officiated in that capacity for Canterbury. The refreshments were provided by Mr Oram in a manner that must have given satisfaction to the most fastidious. The ground was in excellent condition and very true, though perhaps a little too lively for the Cunterburv men.

The game was begun, at twenty minutes to twelve o'clock. Canterbury won the " tos*," and sent the Otago eleven into the field. They took up their position at once, Glasgow being half wicket keeper, half long stop, and as it turned out, doing the whole very well : Turton wae slip, liutterworth third man, Hope long slip, standing very square, Fulton point, Creagh cover point, Alurison mid oil', Chapman mid on, Parker long leg, and Downes and Hendley bowling. It. Mainwaring and A. Cotterill were the first to take the bat on the Canterbury aide At the third ball of the first over R. Mainwaring was given out leg before wicket; E. C. 3". Stevens followed and made a single, when Hendley bowled " a maiden " from the other end. Cotterill in the next over fell a victim to the last ball from Dowries, when A. J. Walker joined Stevens, who took another over from Hendley, and played them all back to the bowler without scoring. Another maidea from Downes, and Stevens made a neat cut for a single off Hendley, and then tried to get one to the olf, but it found its way into Murison's hands and was returned at onc3. After another maiden from Hendley, a safe drive was made by Stevens past the bowler, but Walker was rather slow, and they only got a single. Stevens then put one away in front of cover point, followed presently by another in the same place, but not quite so hard, after which Walker got one to leg for a single, and made a sharp cut for 2, which was nicely fielded by Hope. Parker then relieved Hendley at the bowling, and Walker got a couple of twos to square leg in the first over. Downes bowled a " maiden," every ball of which looked dangerous. A neat cut from Walker for 1 was prettily fielded by Creagh. After Walker had made one more the batsmen parted company, Stevens being caught by Glasgow off Downes after making 6 ; 3 wickets down for 16 runs. Dickenson filled up the vacancy at the wickets, and Walker tried iD on with long slip, but nothing came of it. In the first over from Downes Diekenson didn't seem to be quite at home, but ho went through it pluckily nevertheless. In the next over from the same bowler he had a narrow " squeak," hitting the ball sharply into the hands of point, who dropped it as though he had burnt his fingers. In the next over Parker bowled the first wide of the match, spoiling a succession of maiden overs, during which the bowling had been decidedly good. Parker made up for the " wide " by linding his way into Walker's wicket, who retired with 9 to his credit. The " Cap," as he ia familiarly called, of the Canterbury team then made his appearance ; he certainly looked quite " fit," ns he himself would term it, and showed that he waa good for a few by the way he made his first run. These hopes were, however, doomed to disappointment, for Downes proved too much for him in the next over, and he gave place to Mytton, the renowned " slogger " Hendley went on again, aud at the second ball caught and bowled Dickonaon, who went back to the pavilion without having succeeded in getting anything, though he had stayed at the wicketa for some time. Moore followed next, and played in rather a hesitating way at the two balls he had to receive, and looked quite as if he meant to go out the first straight one. He made a single to leg, and then took an over from Downes without scoring. Hendley then found his way into the wic-ket of the "slogger," who retired without contributing any runs. K. Powys took his place at the stumps, and played so steadily that ho was always too late for the easy bowling ho had at first. Moore took a " maiden " from Downes, and after another over made a sweet " cut" off the same bowler for 2, but received bis quietus the next ball. Young nosy came to the front, and after playing a couple of balls, R. Powys tried a cut, but point was " all there," and suffered no bull to pass by that way. Young saved his " duck" by slipping a ball from Downes, and made another to leg in the next over. lie then tried to get Downes away, but missed tho bali 3 and his off stump suffered in consequence. A. Ollivier succeeded Young, and looked every inch a man, and a3 there is plenty of him j that is saying a great deal. It. Powys made a drive for 2 off llendley, and then his stumps fell to the next ball, leaving A. Ollivier at the wicket without having had a chance of doing anything*. The wickets fell for the following scores :—1 for 0 ; 2 for 1 ; 3 for 16 j 4 for 17 ; 5 for 18 ; 6 for 18 ; 7 for 19 j 8 for 21 ; 9 for 23 ; 10 for 25. The Canterbury men were all out by five minutes past one, and after a short interval play was resumed, Turton and Creagh going in to the bowling of Young and R. Powys. The field were placed as follows : —A. Powys, wicket-keeper; It. Powys, point ; Walker, long slip ; Dickenson, square leg; A. Ollivier, cover point; Stevens, mid off; Cotterill, mid on ; Mainwaring, long leg ; Mytt_>n, long stop; and Moore, short slip; but several alterations were made during the game. Young bowled the first over, which was a " maiden ;'-' but in tho first from R. Powys, Creagh made a single and Turton a fine drive to square leg for 3. Another drive by Turton to square leg for 2 was well fielded by Maiuwaring, and the next one to the same place was so well picked up that only a single was obtained. Young, by v fine bill in fie next over, put a stop to the career of Ci-eagh, who retired in f-ivor of Parbor. Ho drove tho very first ball so neir 1-in-j oil' that it must be c:iik-;l a llf<>r if Stevens had taken it, it would have beon a tine catch iiviued. Turton then made a " ti:iy " poke h:iif wfiy betvveop. the wicket?, and the batsmen stole a run. It proved unfortunate for Turton, for lie was immediately caught by short slip, and Downes took his place at the wickets. Parker made a single to square leg off it. Powys, when Young bowled an over, which he may congratulate himself passed without nny runs being obtained. Parker made a nice drive past the bowlor for a single, and Downes put one to leg, and repeated the operation on the first ball of the next ov.;r. Downes then lifted a ball to the on for a single, which j:i*t fell beyond the field, and tbo next ball Parker was beautifully caught by Moore in tho slips, with his left hand. Mr Rope caruo next, and made a single to

leg, and the over was completed without any more trouble. He played the nest ball under bis leg for a singlo ; Downrs followed suit, but. not hard enough to mute it safe, for il Dii-ktfiison hadn't " fumbled " it, Hope must inevitably have been out. However, Dovvnes was by R. Muiuwanng at square leg, oil a hit that would have been good for three any day. Sanson's name wjs next on the list, and m the first over Cotterill fielded a ball vt-ry i sharpk at lone slip, and no run was made. Hope "tried one to the off, but Stevene prevented him; he was more successful «ith the next ball, which went down to leg tor - Mr Murison made a single to the oil, ami ins partner kept long off hopping about during the rest of the over, lie then made a -. and an attempt was made by the wicketkeeper to dispose of him summarily, but tlie umpire ruled " not out," and Murison kept his place. At two o'clock an adjournment was made to the pavilion for lunch, and at ten minutes to three R. Powys resumed the bowling, Hope scoring a single to the off. A slight mistake was made by the wicket-keeper who failed to put the stumps down when the batsmen were running a sharp run—a clear life to Hope. Murison then made a drive for 2. Hope put one down in the slips for 2, and an overthrow made a 3 of what should only have been an easy single ; ho also made a fine drive for 2 on the on side. R. Powys then made way for Moore at the upper end, and from the way in which " Tommy " handled the leather, it looked as if lie would bo dangerous. Murison made a pretty little hit to leg for 3 off the second over from Moore, and then put one of Young's down by corer point for 2. Hope made a splendid hit to leg for 4, and then played one under his leg for a single, and put Young down in the slips for 2. Murison gave coverpoint something to do in fielding a cut for a single. A change of bowling was now made by Dickenson taking the place of Young. After a " maiden " Hope made a single to leg, and then a couple off Dickenson. Murison tried to get one away in the slips, but Cotterill was too quick for him. Another to Hope on the on side, though rather n sharp one, nnd another at the other end. Moore then bowled a "maiden" over to Murison, every ball of which was put off in a very funny way, nnd Hope also received a "maiden " from Dickenson. In the next over Murison gave a chance to short leg, but it wasn't taken, and he scored a single, Hope making a nice hit for 2 to leg. Mytton misaed the uext ball, and a bye, the first in the match, was the consequence. Dickenson then put a stopper on Murison by a first-rate bailer, and Pulton came out from tho pavilion, but returned at once, a ball from Dickenson finding its way into the wickets off his pads. Chapman then faced the bowlers and made a drive to long off for a single, which certainly ought to have been stopped, and another for 3 over the bowler's head. Hope tried the " Cambridge poke" several times, but the two square legs quite checkmated him. Chapman made a single to the off, which looked very like a catch to longslip, and almost immediately afterwards he gave a chance to point, quite an easy thing, and this was also missed. Four or five " maidens " followed this, when Moore gave up his place to K. Powys, and Chapman made a, neat cut for a single, falling a victim to Dickenson almost directly afterwards. Glasgow followed and had a close shave of being caught in the slip. Hope made a 2 to square leg, and Glasgow a single to the off, Hope getting one more in his favorite place; Glasgow a " small one " to leg, and a fine 3 soon after. Point seemd to be standing a little too far off, for several chances were given round about the wicket and none of them taken. A pretty drive frome Hope for 3 added another valuable item to his score. He " wanned " the next over from Dickenson, but the field seemed to be always in tho way. Again the bowling was changed, Young going on at tho other end, but Glasgow cut him short for 2 and then for a single. Anutber one to the same man in the slips, which was very poorly fielded by Walker. Dickenson bowled a really capital over to Hope, but thut gentleman was now proof against the best of bowling, having " got his eye in." One more for Glasgow on the slips. A forward drive for 2 and a fine square-leg hit for 3 added materially to his score. An nasy run was lost to the off, and a fine hit for three at least was nipped in the bud by A. Ollivier, who returned it sharply to the I wicket-keeper. The c;iptain then put on the slows and placed his field accordingly, but Glasgow inu.de a single in spite of all precautions ; however, in the next over from Young, Glasgow lifted ono rather high, and it fell into square-leg's hands. Uutterworth now appeared on the scene and put the slows away for one ; Hope tried to do the same but nearly made a mess of it, the field being too quick for him. Butterworth gave a skyer on the on side, but the opportunity was not taken advantage of, and two runs were made while the field were wondering how the catch was missed. The slows proved fatal to Hope at last, for he was driven on to his wicket. Hendley now took up the batting, but ought to have 'jeen sent back at once, for he gave as easy a catch to Walker, who was standing mid on, as one could wish for, the ball falling nearly into his mouth, but coming to the groucid instead. Butterworth made a fine hit to leg, but owing to the capital fielding of A. Ollivier, only got a single. Hendley was caught and bowled by Young, and very well caught it was. The last wicket fell at a quarter to five for 9-1 against 25, the total ol their

opponents. The fielding of the Otago eleven was certainly admirable, their quick returns proving anything but a source of profit to the opposite side. On the other hand, tho fielding of the team representing this province was, with some brilliant exceptions, much below the average.

The Canterbury team went in again at five minutes to five o'clock, Downes and Hendley doing their best with the bowling. Cotterill made a 3 to leg,and A. Ollivier the finest hit of the day —a'square leg nearly through the fence for 4. Several singles were scored, the batting and fielding being of the best description, ilendlej was superseded by Parker at the bowling, and Cotterill cut him away for a single. A. Ollivier gave long leg a chance by lifting the ball very high, fortunately for the ■' young-un" it was missed, and he drove the next to square leg for 3, after which Glasgow put a stop to a very lively innings by a firstrate catch just behind the wicket. The runs? had been, made during A. Ollivier'a stay at the "sticks" faster than at any other time during the day. Stevens came nest, but Cotterill left him without adding to the score, which, on the fall of the first wicket, stood at 18. Mainwaring succeeded Cotterill, and played his first over very carefully. Stevens was caught by Hope at short slip off a ball from Parker, and still the total etood at 18. Walker contented himself with guarding his wicket for (he first over, after which Mainwaring made a single and Walker a pretty 2 to square leg, but was caught in the same over by Hendley. Four wickets down for 22 runs. Moore took Walker's place, but Downes veryquickly found his way into his timber yard, and sent him back to the pavilion. Total still 22. Captain Powys filled the vacant place, and contributed 2 by rather a high one to square leg. Mainwaring found Parker's bowling too much for him and went horns to the pavilion. Six wickets down fir 24. Diekensoii then came niU, and in the siime words that we chronicle his appearance ;ve may notice hie disappearance, for ho Ci\;ne out again on receiving the :hird bail from Parker. Young cams up in time to take tiie la.*fc ball of tiie over. Sorerai "maidens" were bowled,and balls to hit were let alone in the most obliging manner. At Jist Young hit a bill to leg and mido a single, but the fates were not propitious, for his wicket fell to a " shooter ! ' from Downes. Eight men were out for

25. Mnton soon niude his appearance, and it seemed fo be the fervent hope of the well-wi3hers of Canterbury that he might uuike a " heap." A 2 to square leg laid the foundation, and the "Captain" drove the bill down to square leg for 3. Mutton followed with a single to the off, and as the clock struck eis. time \v;i3 called, the score standing at eight vackels down for 31, making their grand total 56, with two wickets to go down, against 9& made in the first innings of Otago.

Tho match will be played out to-day, though thero appears to bo small chance of giving a beating in ono innings with runs to -pare" The finest inning* of the day wn undoubtedly that of Mr Hop«, who bsxttccl i-xceedingl.V well, especially after his first, life, when ii chance that ho give, rather curly in his inninsrs was not taken advantage of. The following are the scores in full •' — CA>'TEI!BPIiY. First Tunings'. Second Timings Cotterill, b Downes 0 c Hope, b Dowries G 11. Mfiiiiwaring, 1 b w, h Downes ... 0 b Parker 2 Stevens, c Glasgow, b Dowries ... G c TTopo, b Purker 0 Walker, b Parker ... 9 c llendley,bParker 2 Dickenson, c and b Heudley ... 0 b Purker ... 0 A. Powys, b Downes 1 not out ... 5 Mytton, b llendley 0 not out ... 3 Moore, b Dowries ... 3 b Downes ... 0 R. Powya, b llendley 2 Young, b Do wnes ... 2 b Downes ... 1 A. Ollivier, not out 0 cGlasgow,bPurker 11 Leg bye, 1 ; wide, 1 2 Wide ... 1 25 OTAOO. Turton, c R. Powys, b Young 7 Creagh, b Young ... ... ... ... 1 Parker, c Moore, b Young ... ... 4 Downes, c Main waring, b Young ... 4 Hope, hit wicket, b A Powys ... ... 30 Murison, b Diekenson ... ... ... 12 Fulton, b Dickenson 0 Chapman, b Dickenson ... ... ... '> Glasgow, eR. Powys, b Young ... 17 Butterworth, not out ... ... ... 5 llendley, c and b Young ... ... ... 1 Bye, 1; leg bye, 1; wides, 5 ... ... 7

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INTERPROVINCIAL CRICKET MATCH. OTAGO V. CANTERBURY., Press, Volume XI, Issue 1328, 8 February 1867

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INTERPROVINCIAL CRICKET MATCH. OTAGO V. CANTERBURY. Press, Volume XI, Issue 1328, 8 February 1867

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