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ELECTION OF CITY COUNCILLORS

The nomination and election of city oout" ; cillors for the seven seats rendered vacant by. the resignation of Messrs Alport and Barnard* • and by the retirement in rotation of Messrs E. B. Bishop, Macfarlan, Wbodford, LucJ ? and Fairr, took place yesterday in |be nev; Town Hall. The proceedings Were commenced shortly after noon, at which time there wera not many persons present, but towards tlto end of the meeting the attendance was ecu , siderably increased. Mr E. B. Bishop, as the retiring chairman of the Council, presided, and on the platform were Dr. Poster, the city solioitor, ana MossiM Duncan and Kuddenklau. The Chairman stated that the meeting wal called for the purpose of electing & certain number of members to represent fcbo city in the City Council. The accounts for the yef-t he was eorry to say, were not yet ob'cSneblJ from the printer, but he bed no doubt bu's that they would be rsaij for dfcrartbutiorl before the termination of the meeting, i-balance-sheet would elso be furniahedj and that was the fk'st ocoe'lon i® which such a course had b&oa paOued. .ft had been furnished by the retiring Council with the best intention, co that all the rate* payers might be able to judge of thitr real position, and be hoped that the pssctics would be continued in each succeeding ye&. 3ft" balance-sheet showed that the propesfcy of th-3 City Council "was upwards of £uG©O, which did not include the value of permanent fixtures. It was necessary that they should appoint two gentlemen to audit the accounts. The auditors last year were Mr E. 0. «f» Stevens and the late provincial auditor, Slf Wm. Thompson. H© thought; that they could not do better than to appoint Mr SteyeffiJ and the present auditor, Mr J. Ollivier. No one opposing, the above gentlemen were elected nem. con. The Chairman said their next business woulci to elect two gentlemen to eerve for one yeas , ) in the place of Mesera Barnard and Alport resigned. It was necessary the aominntow and seconders of each candidate should ho ratepayers who had paid their rates. Mr Papprill proposed, and Mr Leaio seconded Mr J. P. Jauiieson. Mr Papprill proposed, and Mr J. Caygfcseconded, Mr J. Buxton. Mr Oram proposodj and Mr Halt secondedMr Tombe. Mr Buxton withdrew in favor of Mr Tomte and tho Chairman declared Messrs Jasries o2 and Tombs duly elected. The Chairman then called for nominaliOß* for the five other candidates in place of tao that retired by rotation. v Mr Orana said that a requisition had W% forwarded to Mr I). B. Bisliop, tm gentleman to stand for re-election. Mc Bishop had always done hie duty well and po3aesst!a the thorough confidence of the ratepayersHe had much pleasure in proposing Mr E. S>Bishop. ■ ' ■ . Mr St. Quento eecooded. tbf nomioatios.

Hβ Aβ" one 6f a deputation v irom the Ratepayers' Mutual Protection Society had waited upon Mr Bishop, requesting him to allow himself to be nominated, but Mr Bishop declined, but ho understood and he was very glad to hear that Mr Bishop had changed hie mind. He hoped for the future that all public works would be let by contract, and instanced as a necessity for such being tie case the immense cost incurred in forming Madras street by day labor. Mr E. B. Bishop was exceedingly obliged to hie proposer and seconder, but those gentlemen seemed to be laboring under a misapprehension. He had stated to the deputation, and to his friends that it was his intention to retire. He had been in the Council for the last four years, and he now wished to make room for some one else. His time at present was also fully occupied, and he should like others to find out what the duties of the Council really were. He begged to decline. Mr Oram pressed Mr Bishop to reconsider his determination. Mr Bishop again declined, and hoped that Mr Oram would propose some other person. Mr Oram said that at a late meeting of the j Batepayere* Mutual Protection he had promised to propose certain persons, and he was there to do so. The first on the list was Mr T. Cooper, and he had great pleasure in nominating him. Mr J. Hart seconded Mr Cooper. Mr Oram proposed Mr Preston. Mr Preston said that he was not eligible, end therefore could not stand. Mr Oram proposed, and Mr Jamieson seconded, Mr Henry Thomson. Mr Oram proposed Mr Henry Jenkins ; ho h&& not seen that gentleman, but understood that he would stand the election if nominated. Mr Papprill had seen Mr Jenkins, and knew that he would not stand. Mr J. Caygill had much pleasure in proposing Mr J. Buxton. He should like to see, in the absence of the town being divided into wards, one member whose interests were on the north side of the Papanui bridge. Mr Leake seconded the nomination. Mr Tompkins would like before going any further to ask the proposed new members what they were going to do if elected. The present Ordinance had, evon in the hands of tried and experienced men, proved very defective, and he did not think that men not used to the work were likely to do much better. He thought Jthat the present meeting ehould be allowed to fall through, as the Government would then be compelled to proceed at once with the new Ordinance. Mr Oram, who, throughout the meeting was very indistinctly heard, was understood to say that he considered the course proposed by Mr Tompkins a very cowardly one. Something to their advantage was likely to be done by the new Council. There was a good deal of their money lying idle in the yards of the Council in the shape of pans and pipes, and he should like to hear what every candidate would do with them before elected. If the Council had the power to buy the pipee, he did not ccc why they had not the power to selL Mr Tompkins was again proceeding to addteas the meeting, when Mr Duncan said that he considered the discussion an irregular one, and hoped that they would proceed to the business. He had 8 member to propose, viz., Mr William Hislop. He agreed with a former speaker, that the different quarters of the city ehould be represented, and Mr Hielop's qualification was situated in the S.W. district. The old Ordinance had been found to work well enough as long as the Council had the Government grant of £20,000 to dispose of, and it would probably continue to work until the £800 which still remained was disposed of. He considered that the old Council had done well. On accepting office they found themselves heavily in debt, and had to contend against the opposition of the Batepayera' Mutual Protection Society. They, had paid off the debt, and had now a balance to their credit; had kept the streets passably well, and had been enabled to form fresh ones. He had much, pleasure in formally proposing Mr William Hislop. Mr Oram seconded Mr Hislop. Mr Carter proposed, and Mr Buxton seconded, Mr Calvert. Mr Eoddenklau proposed Mr William "WuboS. lhat gentleman possessed large property in the town, and he considered him a fit and proper person to represent them in the -Council. Mr Papprill seconded Mr William Wilson: Mr J. Hart considered that if they went on as at present they would be getting nothing bat gardeners in the Council, and the streets would be, as the Town Belt had been, planted with trees instead of being formed. Mr Anderson would lite to know what Mr Hart alluded to $ did he allude personally toMrWileon? Mr Hart did not allude to Mr Wilson. If all the gardeners propoeed were returned there would be three in the Council. Mr John Tincent proposed Mr Tompkins. He did not consider it advisable to return a man who had such a great amount of interest with the ratepayers as Mr William Wilson. He was oppoaed to the ratepayers being heavily taxed for the purpose of making drains, contending that it was the duty of the Government to do so. The work ehould be paid for by borrowed money, so that posterity might bear their fair share of the burden. One main drain ehould be formed by the Government, end the freeholders should be compelled at their own expense to make side-drains into it. The whole of the surrounding districts benefited by the healthiness of the chief city, and the making of the public drain ehould therefore become a public work. Mr Tompfeine was very much obliged to MrTincent for proposing him, but at the same time would not stand. He did not wish to be made a puppet of by the present Act. Mr Lee wished to ask Dr. Foster a question relative to the new Act. The Chairman ruled Mr Lee out of order, but would allow the question to be put to himself. If Mr Lee asked Dr. Foster questions he must expect to pay for the answers. Mr Lee asked if it was fair that the leaseholder and freeholder ehould be compelled both to pay rates. The Chairman stated that under the new Act the tenant would be compelled to pay the rates; and it would be the duty of any tenant to enquire before taking the property whether all back rates were patf. He hoped that the »ew Bill would be before the public for some time before it became law, so that all the ratepayers might express an opinion on it. He hoped that it -would be printed this eeseion, and passed during the next. Mr Lee said he shoujd therefore understand that it was the intention to shelve the Bill Until next session. The Chairman said that if the Bill was hurriedly paeeed it would only lead to freah diffi©ultiee. Mr Oram proposed Mr John Anderson. He was a thoroughly practical and industrious man, and he did not think they could elect a better. Mr Henry Thomson seconded Mr Anderson. The Chairman then asked if any one had another candidate to propose, and no one coming forward, was about to proceed with the election, when Mr Caygill said that before the Chairman proceeded, he thought it would be as well to put a few questions to the candidates. He proposed that they should be questioned in the order in which they had been nominated. Tho resolution was seconded and carried. Mr Thomas, Cooper then went upon the platform, and the following questions were put to him. Mr St. Quentin asked if Mr Cooper was in taTor of an underground or surface drainage ? Mr Cooper expressed himself ia favor of surface drainage for the present, although eventually underground drainage might become necessary. The town was not so large as to make it dangerous on account of fever. Hβ should like to see more artesian wells sunk, was to thoroughly flush the side channels. Mr St. Qiientin—Will you agree to sell the pipes? . •>.-&.?. Mr Cooper would sell all the surplus pipes, tratkeep some for their requirements. Mr St. Quentin—Would you let all works by tender? Mr Cooper—Y W j he certainly did not be-

Herein day work. A party of idle persons were often employed by the Council, and other such things. He was in favor of contracting, unlea a really fair day's work could'be obtained. A Voice—Hare you paid your rates ? Mr Cooper—Yea ; apply to the Town Clerk. Mr Thomson, the next candidate, then came upon the platform, and the former questions were put to him by the Chairman. Hβ was in favor of eurface drainage, but as the town progressed another system would have to be pursued. He would not dispose of the pipes at present, as they had been ordered for a speoifio purpose, and he did not think that they could lawfully do so in fact under the present Ordinance. He was in favor of letting work by contract, and had paid his rates. Mr Oram said that the pipes, when they came out, were packed in coal, and if they had no power to sell the pipes they had no power to sell the coal. Mr Thomson said that the Council must abide by the advice given by their legal adviser. The pipes and coals were bought for two very different purposes, the one to lay down and the other to burn, and he had no donbt but that the coals had been used in a proper manner. Mr Vincent wished to know how Mr Thorneon would raise the money to carry out an underground system of drainage. Mr Thomson thought that it would be advisable for the Council to apply to the Provincial Council for power to borrow money for the purpose. He did not think the Provincial Council should be called upon to do the work. Mr J. Buxton eaid that he considered the drainage question of the utmost importance. If practicable, he would prefer seeing the underground system carried out. Hβ was in favor of money being borrowed for the purpose, and thought it unwise to spend money on temporary expedients. In answer to several questions, he also said he was not at present prepared to etate whether the city was at present able to bear the expense of carrying out the proposed system, but it would also cost a large amount to lay down side channels. He was in favor of all work being let by contract, and had paid his rates. He also hoped that the new Ordinance would be passed during the present session. Mr Calvert said that he would much rather not contest the election, and hoped that they would allow him to retire. [Cries of " No, no."] He did not see, owing to the very level state of Christchurch, how any eyetem of underground drainage could be effectually carried out. Side channels would still be necessary whether they had underground drainage or not, the one was essential the other necessary. He would not advocate the underground system at present. As a business man, if the pipes could be legally disposed of, he would do so, as he considered the amount of capital lying idle in them could be most advantageously used. He was in favor of work being done by contract. Mr Hart—Are yon in favor of the pans being made here instead of importing them from other countries? Mr Calvert said that Mr Hart was talking shop, and had no business to introduce it at that meeting. He supposed Mr Hart really wished to know whether he would like to make the pane. Mr Caygill—Would you be in favor of employing a legal gentleman as town clerk ? Mr Calvert could not altogether answer the question. If it were found that one man could properly fulfil both offices he should be in favor of such a step, but whether or no he should like to see the most rigid economy carried out. Messrs Hielop, Wilson, and Anderson were not present. The Chairman then called for a show of hands, which was declared as follows; — Mr T. Cooper 16 MrH. Thomson 29 Mr J. Buxton 1 MrH. Hislop 35 J MrH. Calvert 43 Mr W. Wilson 22 Mr J. Anderson 31 Messrs Calvert, Hielop, Anderson, Thomson, * and W. Wilson were declared elected. Mr Cooper demanded a poll. The Chairman announced that the poll would be taken to-day at the City Council office between the hours often and four. The meeting then adjourned. ~

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18670109.2.13

Bibliographic details

ELECTION OF CITY COUNCILLORS, Press, Volume XI, Issue 130, 9 January 1867

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2,595

ELECTION OF CITY COUNCILLORS Press, Volume XI, Issue 130, 9 January 1867

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