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CHRISTCHURCH NOMINATION.

The nomination of candidates to represent the district of Chrietchurch in the Provincial Council took 'place yesterday at noon, at the old Town Hall. At the time of nomination—

twelve o'clock —the attendance of electors was not very large, but towards the close of the proceedings there could not have been less than 1500 present. The Beturning Officer (Dr. Donald) commenced the business of the day by reading the Writ, and calling upon any elector present to nominate a qualified person to represent the City of Christchurch in the Provincial Council. Mr John Ollivier said that he had again to appear before them, and very probably for the last time, in the character of midwife, and on this occasion he had two to bring forth. He would not, however, inflict upon them more than one speech. There was a probability, however, of his having to bring forth a third, but the one for whom he would first ask their suffrage was Mr. Hawkes, a gentleman who had long represented them ; and from the consistency and intelligence he he had displayed, he did not think they: would do wrong in electing him again. Hβ had been a very constant attendant at the Council, and if he had failed to satisfy all, he thought that none could be found who would say that he had not done his duty to the best of Wβ ability. The second person whom he had to propose had also been an old representative of the people, and his qualifications were so well known that he would not take up their time by dwelling upon them ; in fact they all knew him well. He was a man who had looked after his own affairs, and had made a competence, and it was only probable to imagine that he would look after the affairs of the State in the same careful manner. He had managed, while laboring in a cabbage garden, to shovel money into his own pocket, and they might depend upon it that those who were careful in looking after their own interests would be equally careful in guarding theirs. He alluded to Mr W. Wilson, whom he considered to have been a good hard-working member, either in the House or in committee, and had in every case done justice to hie constituency. He would not detain them longer, but would merely propose that Mr Hawkee and Mr W. Wilson were fit and proper persons to represent them in the Provincial Council. Mr John Anderson expressed the pleasure that he felt in seconding the nomination of both candidates. Mr Hawkes was a gentleman who had done his work well during the fonr years that he had represented the city ; and he was assured that if Mr Wilson was returned, he would do bis in an equally satisfactory manner. - . • . Mr J. W. S. Coward eaid that he,had a candidate to propose, but would take up their time for only a minute in doing so. He simply wished to nominate as a candidate for their suffrage Mr. W. Wynn Williams, and felt assured that in returning him they would be returning an able man. [Cheers.] Mr George Oram briefly seconded the nomination of Mr W Wynn Williams. Mr B. B. Bishop had much pleasure in proposing Mr Isaac Luck. [A voice—" Yes: bad luck."l Although he could not entirely agree with all that that gentleman had said— but tlits he could cay, that during the time that Mr Luck bad held office as Chairman of the City Council, he had paid the greatest attention to its duties, and perhaps the only fault that could be found with him was, that he was; a little too plainspoken. He felt assured that if Mr Luck was returned, he would devote himself diligently to the duties he had undertaken. Dr. Tumbull said that he had that day a very pleasant duty to perform.:. It..was to second the nomination of the old Chairman of the City Council. [" Who turned the gas off?"] He considered that there was a great deal in luck, and in looking over the list of candidates who were likely to come to the poll, be did not see a name* that was likely to be more lucky than that of the gentleman he was proposing. [Interruptions.] Mr. Luck's cause might likely be injured by his saying anything in its favor ; they all knew the man and his qualifications. He did not care if he saw Mr Luck and Mr Wynn Williams side by side in the Provincial Council; it was an arena in which they could both fight out their differences, and the best man would carry the most sway. (Dr. Turnbull then alluded to the rowdyism that had existed at a late meeting in the Town Hall, and stated his belief that it had not arisen by the fault of either candidate for the Superintendency.) He did not consider rowdyism in public meetings a chronic disease in Canterbury. [Cries of "What about the gas," and "stick to the point."] He considered that he was sticking ing to his point, and was stirring up their gae

pretty considerably. He considered that Canterbury had hitherto always shown a good oxample to the other provinces of New Zealind in electioneering matters, and he hoped that the present fight would be carried out in the same good spirit, and that the fight would be n fair one. They ought never to allow the electors of Christchurch to be branded as " rowdy," or

the term of " rowdyism " to be applied to the province. He considered that in choosing a representative, they should take the man who had shown practical wisdom in managing his own affairs, and Mr. Luck was a gentleman

who had doDe this : it was therefore likely that he would make a good man to manage their affairs. [Interruptions.] Chriatchurch surely did not want two lawyers to represent it in the Council. He considered that one good one— Mr. Ghirrick—out of four members, was quite sufficient; and he could tell them sincerely that he would only support those whose intentions he believed were to do good for the whole province. The fault that Mr. Wvnn Williams had committed was this: instead of doing as that good old midwife, Mr. Ollivier, had done; instead of fostering Municipal Institutions, he had raised mountains of difficulties in their way, and against the progress of the city. [Disapprobation.] He would only speak on one other point regarding Mr. Luck. The business of Mr. Luck's life had been such

as to render him thoroughly conversant with their wants, and therefore he could not fail to

prove a good servant to them in the Provmcio Council. [Cries of dissent.] Mr. Ollivier said the present was probablj the last time that he should have the pleasun of addressing them from any hustings, and In did not consider that he could have a bette opportunity than the present of making i farewell speech than by proposing th< nomination of Mr. Garrick. That gentle man stood so high in public opinion and reputation, and his past conduct had been of such a character, that he was sure no one could be found who would etate that he was not fully capable of representing them in the Provincial Council. He had promised nol to occupy their time, as Mr G-arrick, who had not already done so, had expressed a desire to explain his political views at some length. But before sitting down, he wished eitaply to cay a few words in taking leave. They were all aware that he was a candidate for the office of public auditor, and that if b,e had contested the election and been elected, and after-

wards should have obtained the appointment, it would have necessitated the giving up of his seat for the city, in which case it would have been very probable there would have been another contested election ; and seeing that bo many good taen were being brought forward at the present time, he had felt it his duty to retire. He also began to fiud that years and natural infirmities were telling considerably upon his constitution, and he thought that it was pretty nearly time that the old man should shut up. [Cries of "No! no!"] Ho must <sxpres3 hie gratification at the indulgence which had from time to time been afforded him, and could assure them that, although he was now aware that he had not always been in the right, he had always to the best of his ability endeavored to study the welfare of the province which he held so much to heart; he hoped that he might be succeeded by better men than himself, and by men who would use> their best endeavors as he had done, and he wae thenjeure the province must prosper. [Loud cheers.] He begged to propose Mr Garrick, as a fit and proper peraon to represent them in the Provincial Council. Captain Wilson had great pleasure in seconding the nomination of Mr. Garrick. He had always looked upon him as a very clever man, and he would no doubt make a very useful member. Mr St. Quentin had great pleasure in proposing a man whom he thought would be of great service in the Council, although he was an untried man. But they should recollect th at all public men had at one time been the same. He thought that a little new blood in the Council would be of great service. He would propose Mr S. P. Andrews as a fit and proper person to represent them in the Provincial Council. He came forward as the advocate of the laboring man; and as all the principal interests in the province were represented in the Council —bankers, merchants, tradesmen, &c, —he did not see why the working men should not have their representative. He hoped that all who had the good of the province at heart would come forward the next day and show their interest in the laboring classes by recording a vote for Mr Andrews. ' Mr Vincent considered that the time had arrived when working men should be represented in the Provincial Council* and he thought they could not have a better representative than Mr Andrews; and felt sure that if he were returned he would do his duty to all, irrespective of class. He had much pleasure in seconding the nomination of Mr

Andrews. . Mr W. Wileon eaid he had agreed to nominate Mr E. J. Wakefield, as that gentleman had come to the hustings unprepared for the occasion. Mr Wakefield had expressed his determination of not making a long speech, and he would follow hie example, and simply propose Mr B J Wakefield as a fit and proper person to represent them in the Provincial Council. '

Captain Wilson said that he also had only juat been asked to second the nomination of MrWakefield. He had known that gentleman fora long time, and considered, if returned, from the intimate knowledge which he possessed of the affaire of the province, he (Mr Wakefield) would prove of great service in the Counqil; he had therefore much pleasure in seconding his nomination. The Beturnlng Officer then asked if any other elector had any other candidate to propose; and, hone coming forward, he called upon the candidates themselves to address the electors. • ■ ; Mr Hawkes said that he had little more to cay to them than that he had already published in his address. Hβ asked them to renew the confidence which they had reposed in him for the last four years. He did not wish to refer to his past career, and to point out any particular services that he had rendered to the electore. His acts had always been before them, and if they had satisfied them, he hoped they i would signify the same by returning him toj morrow. If such were not the case, he could only say that he should consider that he had been tried in the balance aud found wanting. On occasions like the present it was usual for candidates to refer to their intended policy, and he would not depart from the custom, but would condense his remarks as much as posai-, ble. The question of education he considered was the most important one that had been brought before the electors, as npon it, to a certain extent, the future of the province depended. He was in favor of an educational rate, to be equally distributed over the province. The system of endowments was one also worthy of consideration, but he considered that the system introduced by Mr Tancred, at the last session of the Provincial Council, to be too expensive and far a-head of the requirements of the times, and, if carried out, would have the effect of crippling their resources. He would give his support to any scheme for the establishment of a public library, as he considered by such a course the laboring man would be much benefited. He considered that a great proportion of public works should be carried out by loans raised for the purpose, provided that the money waa obtainable at an equitable rate of interest. He alse- thongbt that a* soon as the present contracts for the construction of railways were completed,, no fresh ones of a similar character abould be entered into. He considered that the present lines were being constructed in a far too expensive a manner. He was in favor of light tramways being constructed to points where it was ascertained that minerals existed; in fact, to every place where the requirements of the locality necessitated them. He would also offer every inducement to private capitalists to undertake such works, the Government giving a guarantee of a certain rate of interest. Eegarding immigration, he thought it would be impolitic at the present time to bring out any great quantity of male immigrant ; it would only be spending money to feed the goldfields. As soon as possible, however, he should like to see assisted immigration carried on to a limited extent, as it was only by the country becoming populated that it could become prosperous.

Hβ would deprecate any m-eat «n T""" , * the land regulations, wiWe £??*»h those relating to the pre-emptive Sf' 0 * <* he thought might be beneSwS !j»»*h had been decided by the other candM f" , ' II th,y should ecfin/their JZoZ t* f" a tune as poss.ble, and he therefore wJlh ** detain them longer. If ho had doneht J "J* ho would emm their rotes to-morrow tf* he hoped they would reject him w»> D 5 not adapt this course they would not bo!?* their duty to their country. He honed ♦ 8 early at the poll a sufficient numbe? of* T recorded for him to make him confiaU being returned ; and he could »S"2 ° f that m the event of such being the"! ? would use his best energies and endeavS . promote the interests of the province Mr Win. Wilson could simply pohi his past conduct as an earnest of ~y ' would do for the future. They all kne»v and know what he did do he did with He did not wish to act contrary to the p agreed upon by the other would conclude in a few words breirin? «, tho assurance that, if returned, he wonM all the ability and energy of wbjSiiS possessed towards the good of the col™* generally. Mr Wynn Williams had decided not t* occupy too much of their time nt that l»t stage of the proceedings ; all candidates W plenty of opportunities during the last tbw> months of fully explaining their polS sentiments; and if they had neglected tie on portunity, it was their own fault and not hu He had not done so ; ho had called meeting at the Town Hall, and injseveral other and had given every elector an opportunity of knowing his opinions. The " Press" \ai etated that he had occupied the time of public meeting in the Town Hall for fully fcm hours, and what he had said then, he would stick to now; he had givon his views fully and plainly, and would not now repeat them, H« hoped that in the present contest all personal feeling would bo thrown on one side. If $» believed that a fair and equitable Act «tr required for properly conducting tfo affairs of the city; and if they wished such an Act introduced, "he was the man." In the " Proee" of Thursday Jjjt would be found one of the most sounilouj and cowardly articles that had ever been written, and in which it-had been etated that he was not fit to ueosiate with any gentleman ; but the conclusion >f that article showed the gist of the writer ? What did it wind up with ? Why with fchew irords : —" He can speak for two hours at s itretch, and will likely get in;" and tfee ffords were made use of, after the writer had ibused him like a pickpocket. He could issure them that he had no peouniary motive for going into the Council; Ma principal motive was to obtain for tho citizens a fair and equitable act. Mr Williams then ex* plained his views on the division of the city into wards, and contended that by thU means alone could justice be done to the different sectione of ratepayers. If elected, he would use his utmost endeavors to get the present difficulties between the ratepayers and the City Council adjusted by tho passing of a new Act, and would also endeavor to do hi» duty to the beat of his ability for the welfare" of the whole province. ;/i Mr Luck then came forward, and wee received with mingled groans and cheers. He end that he stood before them as a candidate for the representation of the city in the Provincial Council, and he was vain-enough to think that he had some claim on their indulgence. Since hie arrival in the province many yean ago, he had always endeavored to be associated with any work that had for its objeot the benefit of his fellow-colonista. They had already been tofd that an arrangement had been made with the candidates to out their various addressee as short as .possible ; and,'althonghithere wb»! many subjects on which he wished $o epwJLhe would not depart from the rule already laid down by speaking at any length : and in the short time that was allowed him, it would be impossible to condense to auch an extent that a charge of plagiarism could not be imputed to him, as evory eubject had been so fully spoken and written about. Bufc what he would *y was this, that if they liked to elect him, fo would do his duty. There was afri&ttthing he wished to mention, having refewsK* to the City Council. The law undaf wwen that body was inaugurated, whether good« bad, waa the law which the Council m to carry out ; and he was a* sorry even the bitterest of hie opponent*-u» the law had proved faulty, and that the present difficulties had arisen; but aU the CourcU could do waa to carry the law oat aethey wA found it. [Here some one in the crowd pro-: duced a cartoon, whiobjhad originally appe&reo in " Punch," and which had beeneiteneiTf? , circulated in town during the -last fow- TOM and, holding it up to Mr Luck, aiked ka : what hetboughtof.it.] Mr Lack Hated thj he possessed a copy, and was muoh amused mra it; there was certainly something in appearing in " Punch," hut he could not see the force OS paying for it; and those cartoon* lmaet certainly have cost his opponents no He should take the cartoon home, «*»]"**» up in his nursery, properly glazed and ™>®**> as a memento worthy of » a chadren. He deplored, as much «:**TgJthe personal antagonism that haS beei»-iBWJ luced into the present conteet, and wow 'ssure them that if Mr Wynn Wffl-J J»J himself were returned he should ■"WjjJJJ gentleman on the floor ofthe H«»;«4j»J ; ' vor, as far ac lie consistently could, to *«*2 him for thefcenefit of the province, Hβ that the electors would t°:™™**f%s before giving their votes, who bad bj»-»J tried friends, and would in whom they had confidence, party feeling. Iα conclusion, he ™$*% the W men might be returned, and^JM Council would be composed of WW» WUO J u » do credit to their judgment. He neja-o say, as had been said by an, elected him he would do ■»»«-*5£ l Jg. to further the interesU, not oalyof■-»•«*« but of the whole province- [Obeete *» gro i&. e "Garrick eaid that after the ■jjg**! had been cast upon him by Mr. appeared before the electore u***m WJJ. able circum-tanoee. Sβ labored, fe>«'«-. under one difficulty, h refer to hie past experience, but.» himself to be tolerably d^'ff rf pledge himself that, if elected, J^Jji he alluded to eeparaboj ffig&m electors then, ac he bad^ tola,-jW"» fl g that hie opinion on that *$«*,*"£,; &* as ever. He was decidedly of O£U»om "dees the interest orthis «la«d con-idered in the ehquld be driven into m separation. But that jj. »£ JV^ which fiiirly "e«Be i « aef *^. I S£ e SIU- the of the Provincial Councd. The jb Council could do would and he tion to be forwarded to new r proxmeed that if such a r"*^ I *™* Josed, before giving his J*» gSgpjh-*) place fcia resignation ™J*f f ™s£ The most important; eubject^ for WJJ tion of the Council was %&«»«« tion of the F°™»- **<,&#* ** £70,000 in debt, and it Jf* under Superintendent to have to ta» each a burden. »«g any meaeures by whieh_he ««• clearly to relieving the pro*™ burdens and providing fond* ws * m tratiouofthe Government.. w hich works, there were ««", && ■■» the province ™. * would demand th f of the Council that ff Bhould be carri«d out and "jJJJ. «p *• fiUed. Howiu m 1 "f ■ country by % state of the pubho funde M . -,« » adopt the cheapestmean» of <» confc be done br pledge much the better, but hecouij ft wW

#„ that of an advene majority. Another very n«rtent subject w*» that of education, which considered, that parents who had the S^Ttoeducate their children should be left without assuttance, bat that schools K*nld be established by the Government TfzJhout the province, and education be SeSpuboty on afi. If any parent; not educate their children he would STthem awarand educate them whether S would or not. [Cneem] .He SiW bowerer in iaror of denonunaS.l education. [Cbee»-3 He w« opto any alteration in the land laws, {"fcring tbst they were sound in prmciple, Ilf thit the only error by in then- adminisSLoTana I* wL sure that the holder, of ZZmvdn right* would meet in a proper i fSTJn, propel to do away with existing other subjects that would -ZTmider the notice of the Council, but he Sednot refer to them all; he would only add, JwTifekcted a* their member, he would use £&3forUtodo.ll that he could for the JUS* o* tl» pWTince as a whole. [Ap-

P Siriad»w» eaid he had explained hie «*: i> faagth in the Town Hall and other I?!!! and h*d abirked no qoeetkra of importthe province at large. He came forfld v the repreeeutative of the working rsppkow] not by hie own choice, *™ .Section had been taken to him that he flStTwpporter of Mr Moorhouee; but KJj£ bXSI that he traa likely to offer ZJrhtdoat opposition to Mr Moorhonee, it [Cheer*.] Hi. Sn-aSti* were among themoet hard"•£!J*Snb«, of Mr MoorboWe comZmbT He ahould leave himeelf in the hands *ftheelecterß,and if he waa returned aa their and there was any matter to 23Tt!U? wkbed to direct hie attention he 25d be happj to meet them w*™ l "'!™"* [Cheer*} Ife B. J Wakefield had had opportunities hie opinions on all important ZiZ-kand it would be a waete of time to ZSpftulate them. There were only two point* mutt cay a few words. In the fLTnkor if be were elected, and found at fnV time that he dimwed with the electors on Jitter of principle, eftw meeting them in Lj£> ed baring the matter out so that they SS be «» ther understood each other if ♦EVeoald not oome to an agreement he should inaediataiy resign hi* seat. Then with regard to tb, put he had taken in opposition to Mr Voorhoose, he wished to say distinctly and TmMicfr that as Mr Moorhouse had been Jwed by » gnat majority he should offer him Bobatioe* opposition, but whether in or out o/ the Oewncil would aaeist him, as fcr as he could, to carry on the gOTernment of tbe proTHM4. FAPttJaHUO* I The Betuming Officer then called for a show of hands, which be declared to be in fcvor.of Meant, earrick, Hawkea, Wyun Williams, and Aa&rewa. A poll waa demanded, which it wat announced would be held to-day from nine aan. to fourp.m, and the official declaratioß gt the remit made on Monday afternoon, at fop o'clockAnte of thanks to the Beturning Officer. provoMd by Mr Wilson, seconded by Mr Wakefield, terminated the proceedings.

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Bibliographic details

CHRISTCHURCH NOMINATION., Press, Volume IX, Issue 1119, 9 June 1866

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4,177

CHRISTCHURCH NOMINATION. Press, Volume IX, Issue 1119, 9 June 1866

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