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MAORI REPORT OF THE SPEECHES AT THE MEETING AT PERIA.

(From the Taranaki Herald, December 20.)

[translation.] The speeches of the meeting at Pcria, convened by William Thompson te Whaharoa. To it came the chiefs of the distant districts (whenua), and on the 11 tli day of October, 1862, the debate commenced. William Thompson stood up and said : The cause Tor which I have called you to come liither is this: it is sufficient for mc to have set up the King, but it is for you, the chiefs of this meeting, to examine dispassionately the opinions (literally words) which may be published now (or spoken). The good or the cvi) regardiifg the road at Maungatawhiri and Whaiugaroa, whether it (the road) may be thrown open or closed! These are the things you have to do. Hohai then stood up and said : I am of Ngatiawa of Whakatane, and this is what I say. Let us search dispassionately, and if we see reason that the road should be open, let it be open; but if we see reason that it should ho closed up, let it be closed up. Up stood Eparaima and said: I am from Ngati Porou of Whiiiripu. laraa voice from the thousands five, 5.000 (sic ). I am not willing the road should bft opened, to pass from Maungatawhiri to If a man be disemboweled he dies: and if the road id opened in the centre of the island the like consequences will follow, therefore let the road be closed up. William Thompson stood up and said : I called you hither, for it was a thought of mine to call you together. I saw in the newspapers that £500 had been given for the road (to Waipa), and 4s. per day to the men employed ou it, and I thought that your Pakelia friends were bringing evil upon you by what you were doing. I was suspicious lest the big guns should be brought by this road, which is close to Ngaruawahia. The Governor was right to be suspicious and to prevent us hau'ng guns and powder, lest we should turn round upon him and destroy him with it; likewise, I am suspicious about this road lest the Governor should turn round and destroy mc What man is there who would not be suspicious and take care of his own body ? The Scriptures saith that a man should care for his own flesh. Then followed Kereopa te Rau, of Rotorua, and he said : Do not eat the karakas warm. It is better to take them to the water, and then they will be wholesome food. Do not drink quickly the tutu, lest you should be made giddy ; it is better to let it be a little time, nnd then it will be fit for drink. In like manner, if we are too hasty in giving our consent to this road to be opened, death will be in jt for us. It is better, O tribe, to stop the road. Up stood Rewiti Manotini, of Ngaiterangi, and be said : This is great evil for us. My -thoughts are in my words to you. I tell you what I think, this (the road) is a great evil for all of ns. A flood will burst from this river (alluding to the road), if opened up; and I say, therefore, let the road be stopped. Up stood then another man, Matiu Wahapurua, of Ngatimaru, from Hauraki, and he eaid : I will nor five consent for my grandfather's backbone to be cut | in two, therefore I say that Maungatawhiri and Whaingaroa are to be shut up. Up stood Ngairo Ko Kahuhunu, from Wairarapa, and be said : 1 come from the fish of Operoa (from the other end of the island). I am fearful about this I road of Maungatawhiri and Whaingaroa. let it ho. \ shut up; let the matter be ended. j Up stood Paul Kaiwhata no Kahuna, trom Abu- l »n, and be said: We do not know how this land is utuated in Whaingaroa and Maungatawhiri. Who is the owner of it—the Maoris or the Pakehas? It | is tor the Waikatos to tell us this, that we may understand how it is situated. In answer to this question, Herewini to Whakaete K« up and mad«> a long explanation, which eubstan-j 'ally is to this effect, that the land at Maungatawhiri, «ad bom partly sold to the Europeans secreily; tkt wy had objected to the Pakchas coming to Maunga- j wwlnn in 1856, making it appear/on the whole, that I

the Waikatos were justified in the steps they were taking to stop the road in that direction. Up stood Karaitiana, of Kahuhunu, from Ahuriri, and he said: It is right when a piece of the king's land is mixed with land held by the Europeans, that all should be treated as the king's land. Therefore, stop the road. Up stood Wmhana ngati Kahuhunu, from Ahuriri, and he said : This land is in some measure situated like land that we have in our country, and I will.vote with the majority. Up stands Hohaia Whakatane, and he said: God made mc a man, and he made this place for mc to live in. Portions of this land have been parted-with, and the Government want to get it all from us; but now it has come to this that no more can be parted with, and the road must be stopped up. Up stands Te Hira, of Ngatihaun, from Wanganui, and he said : I am only one ; but I come here to carry the words of 500. Shut up the road. Up stood Wiremu Toetoe, of Waikato, and he said : Listen to mc, all you tribes of this meeting. I was the bad man in the days of the reign of king Potatau (the first) ; but I have been to the countries of Europe, and I have seen the kings, each one who is sitting (or ruling) in that great country of Europe. The power or jurisdiction of one king does not overlap the power or jurisdiction of another king. From having seen these things. I first became aware that the idea of the natives in setting up a king for themselves was correct. Therefore, I say, stop the road. Up stood Wirenmte Waharoa, and he said: We have bad sufficient on the former subjects (the roads) Now listen to mc, this meeting. I have three roots of talk (subjects for discussion), to lay before you. Rent; shall we rent, or shall we not? Shall we take credit, or shall we not? The old debts, shall we pay for them, or shall we not? The Europeans who are living within the bounds of the Maoris, shall we expel them, or shall we not ? It is for you to consider these matters

[ These tilings being accordingly considered by all the people, it was written down on paper: — Ist. We must love the Pakeha who are remaining within our bounds who are of good appearance (well behaved); but the Pakehas of an evil appearance we must expel them. 2nd. Rent is not to be consented to, at least at the present time (land not to be leased), because these days are days of trouble and confuMon. 3rd. Old debts are to be paid.^ 4th. Credit roust no longer be taken. sth. All disputed lands are to be inquired into by the Court (whakawa) which shall examine and decide upon thorn. fr On the 27th October, 1862. the King got up and said: come bore the men of the east, of the north, of the west, and of the south, come here to Waikato We have always been a noble people. Although our skins are dark, let the understandings of the statesmen be bright; and let them adhere to law, to love, and faith. Up stood and said : Salutations to you Matutaera, the chief of Waikato. This is what I have to say to you. Let there be but one law—the Queen's law; let there be but one authority (mana) — that of God. Do not divide the law and make them two, lest there be confusion. 0 William Thompson, give up Waitara, that it may be judicially inquired into; also Tataraimaka, let it be returned to my widows (the expelled settlers). Let them return to their place (homesteads). It is for you Thompson and Matutaera to consent to this. If you hold Tata* raimaka mc and my widows roust return across the sea, and leave this land a land of confusion. Then stood up Kereopa, from Rotorua, and he said: Listen to mc this meeting. I consented formerly that the question about Waitara should be judicially inquired into, but now it is impossible to do so. It may be compared, to a sack of wheat, which has been epilt all over the ground. Who is there that can pick up the grains of wheat and make the sack exactly what it was Uefoye. Up stood Hoera, of Ngatipornu, from Waiapu, and he said : It will not be right for the mana of the Queen of England to override the mana of King Matutaera It is not possible to yoke a horse and a cow in the same yoke. Thi3 is »what I fliink about Waitara. Why was it not judicially inquired into formerly when it was easily possible to have done so ? Do we not see that needlce and other small trifles are inquired into judicially when they are stolen/but Waitera this great thing leave it to be wakawaed by blood. Up stood W Thompson te Waharoa, and be said : O Bishop, if Wnitara is to be inquired into, how about the king ? You nay there only (in reference to Waitara) lies the difficulty. According to mc the king is the thing of most consequence. At the time we were fighting nt Waitara your (plural) letters came to mc and they faid, " William, go and makepeace." There was no question in tbt m about the king. I therefore went and made peace. When 1 had made peace I came back, arid you then say to mc, '• 0, William, let down the mana" (king). Then I began to think that I was being humbugged (manuitra). Who can be prepared for the manifold tricks (raweke) of the Governor ? lam preserving the island; but lam out of breath (exhausted). Who can parry attacks on every side ?

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Bibliographic details

MAORI REPORT OF THE SPEECHES AT THE MEETING AT PERIA., Press, Volume III, Issue 97, 3 January 1863

Word Count
1,737

MAORI REPORT OF THE SPEECHES AT THE MEETING AT PERIA. Press, Volume III, Issue 97, 3 January 1863

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