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A Man of Millions.

SKETCH OF BARON HIBSCH.

Every man is an envolope containing three individualities, (a) As God knows him j (6) as he appears to the world ; and (c) as he himself thinks he is. The second of these categories may be subdivided into two parts— namely, as he appears to his mends, and as he appears to his enemies. Baron de Hirsch as he appears to his enemies is a wealthy, self-seeking Hebrew, who, having acquired riches as a robber baron of the 19t;b century, .vulgarly buys with bis wealth the countenance of people of station and entrance to the Prince of set. 4 * This estimate of Baron de Hiisch's character can only (says the { Pall Mall Gazette) be accounted -"jt<k by the existence in him, as in most strong men, of indifference to public opinion, and even a secret delight in being abused for faults which really Jo not exist. The baron is a proud man ;he is a good man ; and he combines great intellectual power with cool judgment, tenacity of purpose, and singular industry. His habits are almost ascetic. The pleasures of the table have no attraction for him.. He does wot smoke. Bising early, he works steadily for six hours on end, wherever he may be. His operations of charity are so vast that he finds himself Prime Minister of a Government financed by himself, the expenditure of which exceeded last year the revenue of some of the smaller European States. In the year 1891 Baron de Hirsch either spent, or pledged himself to spend, on charity, £8,000,000 sterling, or more than four times the revenue of the Salvation Army. < As many as 400 begging-letters a day sometimes reach him. The mystery is not only that he does 40 much good but that he does it bo quietly. A few days ago it leaked out that his racehorse La jHeche wan, defactOf running for the London hospitals. La Fleche is only a part of a system. All his horses last year not only ran for the London hospitals, and a sum of £7,000 was divided among them, but the baron pays all his trainers' bills and other expenses, and then hands over to the London bos* pitals the gross winnings of his stud of racers. He hates newspapers and advertisements of all kinds, of which truth this one fact is an instance. Baron de Hirsch has been very ill* An ugly rumour of his death spread through the London clubs last week with the rapidity of a forest fire.Bad he died, facts would have come out which would have set. the world wondering that they did not recognise him as he is before he died. Perhaps the keynote to his character, is chivalry. It is told in Paris how, ; when he and another Jew who was' his enemy's son were blackballed for a certain club, he bought the building for an enormous sum. The club committee, loth to leave their old quarters, offered to elect him if he would relinquish his bargain. His reply savoured of the 14th century : * Sleep your club, but elect a Jew. I name the gentleman who was blackballed in my company.' The club, accordingly,., accepted these terras, and took back the lease from Baron de Hirsch air the price he paid for it. They elected his enemy's son. The only detail that remains to chronicle is tbat to this day that enemy's son does not know that he owes his election to the chivalry of Maurice de Hi rsob. Many well-informed people object to the friendship tbat is supposed to exist between the Prince of Wales and Baron de Hirsch. It is assumed that a friendship between the Prince and the financier cannot exist without a golden link. Their friendship, however, has no Bucb origin ; it subsists on no such tie. A few years back the only son of Baron de Hirsch died. The Prince of Wales exhibited to Baron de Hirsch in his grief some of that sympathy which he himself, for the same rea9oo, has since sorely needed. It was over the grave of Baron de Hirsch's only son that hit friendship for the Priace of Wales was founded. There is no foundation for the rumours of ignoble debt. The Prince of Wales is4be onljvsubjecfc o£ the Queen who caunot^fxeply to malicious attack. He, too, bas great and generous qualities of which England may be proud ; and his friendshiif% for Baron de Hirsch is free from itblMf sordid elements commonly: attributed to it. ? it is sometimes said, aivd uxpre, often hinted,' that the way in which Baron de Hirsch has made bis fortune*? will not bear the light of day. This* is not true. He is the grandsoß aiyl " the son of rich men. He manied a 'ady with a very large tortooe. Everything he has touched has turned* to gold, mainly in consequence of his * skill in the choice of men.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/BOPT18930428.2.32

Bibliographic details

A Man of Millions., Bay of Plenty Times, 28 April 1893

Word Count
826

A Man of Millions. Bay of Plenty Times, 28 April 1893

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