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THE Bay of Plenty Times

"WE SPiWT OF THfc T(MES SHALL TEACH ME SPEED." tCJNO JOHK. ACT IV

RATUHDAY, MAY 21, ISSI

The fate of (lie 'iJeprcsenlutfon Hill is a matter llmfc iiflVols llio interests of Taur.'inga more than perhaps any ofiuu 1 purl; or the Colony. TIIO Bay of Plenty has long boon tied to Poverty I'a.y, a district with whose interests i(. hasHltle or nothing in common —indeed we have closer- relations will) even ihn people of Ounedin or O.ini.'iru than wilh our G-i shorn c 7)ei^iihor.s — and (he. ] eo])lu of 'J'jutrang.a have l"ii^ been .anxious? lo see the bond scA'erod so Ihnt ihoy wight not. any longer be a political nonentity. As it is they are almo m practically unrepresented, and if the forthcoming election is to be carried out on \he lines of the existing systo?" ■»♦' re_nresenta-

tion, the ovil will bo perpetuated to the great detriment of tho interests of the entire Tauranga and Opotiki communities. The promised measure, therefore, is one wliich jwssesses a special interest for tlie people of Tauranga and it would be a serious • blow to tlie place if anything should occur to interfere with its being passed. In a communication written from the JNorthern Club, Auckland, and dated the 18th instant, Mr E. M. Edgcumbo, formerly of this town, draws attention to this matter. Mr Edgcumbo thus writes — " To the Editor of the Bay of Pj.exty Times, Sir, — A significant item of information recently came to hand from tho scat of Government. It is one which, according to my interpretation vitally affects Tauranga as an integral part of the East Coast Electorate. Its effect is that a diversity of opinion, has arisen in the Cabinet respecting tho propriety of certain measures' being brought forward this session. Thoro is also appended tho further information — 'There- is every probability of a compi'omiso being arrived at, and it is nob by any means unlikely certain pet measures will not again be put forward until at all events an opportunity is afforded for expressing their opinion as to the utility of such measures.' Kow,. Sir, I may be mistaken, but I oannot help thinking Hint means that the long-talked of* Representation Bill,' bolter known as (lie Rea<Jjiisfmon.t of S^afs is not to make its appearance again. You arc probaHy aware that this is one of. a list of Liberal measures forced on Government; by their predecessors. It was part of tho programme brought down by tfir George Grey in the speech delivered by His Excellency the Governor at the opening oH the Hrst session at 38/9. It was one of the ■tickets' upon .which the general election following closely thereon was fought —indeed so very emphatic was popular testimony borno in favour pf that measure that when- the Hall-Government assumed oilice, after tho reassembling of Parliament he (Mr Hall) accepted it unconditionally as a vital part of his polic-y. He did so, as you, are aware at the expense of being twitted with having- been made to swallow tho measures of the Government he had succeeded in defeating. Sceptical persons of whom- there were not a few, then as now, marvelled greatly that Mr Hall should have taken Sir George Grey's place, and at tlie same time usurped his proposals, thereby showing a marked want of self-reliance. To say the least ol: it, it was a sleight of htind trick, hard to be understood. The Hall party succeeded, however in silencing adverse criticism, by the anxiety they professed to see the Representation Bill, and kindred measures carried out. The 1 ill, as you know, after advancing one or two trilling stages was shelved, on the plea that time would not admit of its completion, and, as if to mark their sense 61 regret, a distinct promise was given that it would be forward at an early stage of tho then ensuing session. Well, it did come down as we know, but they never had the moral courage to press it to a division, and then again when the session was getting to a close it was, amidst even louder protestations than ever of their determination to see it through this session, withdrawn. It is ihore than a mere whisper that the supporters of the Government are. as a b >dy, madly opposed to the passing of this measure, and, I ask. can it bo that tho announcement referred to above,, is simply a preliminary in tlie direction of disposing of the JJill altogether without allowing it (o see- the- light of day at the incoming session? Presuming that tobctho- real purpose-, you will, I think Si:', agree with me that the proceeding j'l'om first to- last has bee-n most discreditable. When Sir George Grey asked for, and obtained a dissolution of Parliament in lS7t>v the denunciation was hurled at him for not allowing his Representation Dill to go through and then,, if so minded, tight a general election on its readjustments. Assuming for arguments, sake that tho complaint was well grounded, what is to be said about these men, who were the loudest, in their complaints, and who afterwards espousing the cause of tho Bill, have kept it dangling before tlie country year after year, allowing it now to drop when Parliament is about to expire by eilluxvon of time, thereby necessitating a new election, being fought out on the old basis? In other words they are just perpetrating the very sin, in, an aggravated form, they were loudest in denouncing in the persons of their predecessors. A more flagivnt abuse of political principlo could not, in my humble opinion,, be named. I have- already said tho ovil will operate seriously upon tho interests of Tauranga and Opotiki, hitched on as they are to Poverty Bay, a district with which they possess nothing in common, not even a through line of road — the clisi'ranchisemont hitherto experienced will in ell probability continue to bo felt. Of course the dropping out of the Bill altogether is, as yet only a surmise, still I lake it to be sufficiently palpable on its face to justify me in asking you to direct special attention to this-, a grievious wrong, by which the East Coast is being menaced."

It is to be hoped that the people of Taurauga will not ))o discouraged by the reply sent to the Chairman of the Town Hoard's telegram to the Government in regard to the opening of T.uiranga- as n port of entry. It is probable that a similar communication will be received in answer to the resolutions passed at the public meeting, but, even so, we should jiot slacken our energies after one or two refusals, but should press our claims, until we obtain what we want. Now that a new trade is being opened up, it is a matter of vital importance that we should not give an opportunity to those that have adverse interests to circulate the report that vessels from beyond the seas are not allowed to land cargo in Tanranga. No matter what arrangements might bo mailc> short of opening the port, owners of vessels and shippers would be chary about sending vessels here under the existing arrangement, and our trade would inevitably suffer, as all our goods would have to be purchased second hand. Thus, not to .speak of the inconvenience of having to bring a Customs officer here on every occasion of a vessel's arriving from foreign ports, there is the further anrl more serious danger of oup foreign trade being suppressed altogether. We wero given to understand by the master of the Warafcah that he would probably return "with a cargo in about threo months, but unless some change is made in our Customs arrangements in the meantime, he is not likely to risk encountering all the troublo and delay lie met with on his first trip. We are able to state that a gentleman in the district. is negotiating with a sugar refiner in Mauritius with a view to having eonuignmonlfl of sugar sont directly here, instead of by Melbourne as heretofore. '1 he latter genth'in:\n is one of tho principal shippers of Mauritius sugar to Melbourne, and it would lie a great matter to the merchants and people here if they could get their supplies direct, saving the oxp"U3L' entailed by obtaining them from Melbourne. 'It is desirable therefore! that those i'.itisrostod in the town should make nn eflbrfc to remove all obstacles out c f the way of such an important trade. Our Harbjiir-Mast-jf in quite competent in do all the; business till the trade increases to .such an extent as to warrant us in asking for a superior officer, and with an addition of £50 a year or so to his salary for his extra duties, he would not be over paid.

Tuesday next being the Queen's BirfcbJay will bo observed as a general holiday. I The s.s. Sta^fa^ left this port st 4 a.m. on Thursday. She"4j£&' a large cargo for Te Puke, which was to be landed at Makctu on her way down tire coast. ■ A meeting ofzttc Tauranga Comity Council will be held in the Council Chambers, Government Buildings, at 11 a.m. on Wednesday next, the 25th instant. The cutter Tbfccrau arrived here from Mercury Bay on K Thursday evening "with a full cargo of timber and four passengers. She leaves again for Mercury Bay this evening. In the Wellington Divorce Court decrees nisi, were granted in the following cases : — Hedloy v. Hedloy, Wellington ; Wilson v. Wilson, Wellington ; and Mudgway v. Mndgway, Wellington. . ' The two barques Clara Hargrcaves and Martha are still lying near the sandspit at Sulphur Point. ]t is probable that the Clara Hargraivcs tvill shortly be tmverl to Auckland. It is expected that the, Martha will remain here. The Arab Chief, Ben Azzes, civil and spiritual head of the powerful tribe of "Bcni Snassen, has left Auckland tn route for Mecca, where he inten Is to spend three months in prayer at Mohammed's tomb prior to liis returning to his home in Algeria. The right to the gate money and other race course privileges in connection with the race meeting j£o be hold on the Queen's Birthday, "will be offered at public auction at noon to-day in the Harington street sale rooms, by Mr It. 0. Jordan, auctioneer. A number of ladies moving in the best society in Dunedin having expressed themselves too freely about a certain M-oman in that town, their husbands were sued for defamation of character. They settled the matter by each paying the aggrieved party £50. We have been shown a plan of the Te Puke Special Settlement, forwarded to England by the 'Frisco mail, Avhich closed here yesterday. The plan had been- very neatly executed by Mr J. B. Jackson, surveyor, and measured 12 feet long by 3 feet 6 inche3 wide, the scale being 10 chains to the inch. The drama "Midnight Watch" is to be played in the Temperance Hall on Tuesday evening next, the Queen's Birthday. The programme also contains a musical interlude, and will conclude with the comedy " Ont to Nurse."' The principal performers are Mrs Thornton,, and Messrs Thornton and Neighbour. Full particulars will be found in the advertisement appearing in another column. A meeting of the Tauranga Jockey Club was held in th» Commercial Hotel on Thursday evening, Mr R. C. Jordan being in the chair. The minutes of the previous meeting having been read and confirmed Mr James Home and Mr J. B. Jackson were appointed handioappors for the race meeting to be held on Tuesday. Messrs J. H. McCaw and E. Sheppard were appointed auditors, and Messrs J. B. Jackson and It. C. Eraser a working committee. Many of the people do not se?tn to fully understand the working of the Registration Electors Act, 1880. We hear that the people of Gisborne are continually getting new names on the roll, while thojse at tin's end of the electorate display that apathy which in too many cases is almost characteristic of the district. Persons who have resided twelve months in the colony and six mouths in one Electoral District are duly qualified to have their wines on the liat, also owners of freehold property who have been in posseasion.for a term of six months. Those who desire to exercise their privilege of voting and have not qualified themselves to vote must lose no time in doii>i; so us there will in all probability bo a general election before the end of the ..present year. The arrangements in connection with tho shipping' sorvioo between this port and Auckland arc exceedingly unsatisfactory. The Wellington arrives here on Wednesday morning and leaves again the same evening, giving merchants an.l others here only a tow hours to answer correspondence. She then returns on Friday, leaving again the same evening. Tims wo arc kept five days without any communication with Auckland, and persons wishing to visit the metropolis of the north on. business must do all they have to do on Thursday, which is often too short, or they must prolong their sojourn for nearly five days. Surely some better arrangement could bo devised than this, which is so inconvenient to business people especially, not to speak, of the delay caused in the delivery of the mails. The marine phenomenon witnessed by those on board the Glenelg on her first trip to Tauranga this week seems to have boon caused by a submarine eruption. When between the Slipper and Mayor Island a large, volume of water was- observed to suddenly vise about twenty or thirty yards, away from the steamer. It gradually increased until a circle of about sixty fecfc in circumference was covered, and rose about four or five feet in the air, mud, sand, stores, and shells being sent ilying about aver the surface of the water, which was kept in a state of boiling for some time. The Glenelg, although a short distance away, hardly felt the shock, and the eruption seemed to bo confined to a very small space. The- phenomenon may have lwd some connection with Whffce Island, which is situated 50 miles away. A correspondent suggests an explanation of the Cameron Road mystery, which, if not the true one, has at any rate tho merit of originality. Some time ago a certain gentle.man in town of an enquiring turn and well read in books, hazarded iho wild statement in public that science was advancing so rapidly that before long scientific men might be able- to educe life from some combination of forces. "This statement," he says, "may have so iin pressed itself on the mind of a certain individual in town that it is quite possible he may have conceived the idea of being- tho fkst to put the •mutter to the test by actual experiment. Certainly there must bo some reason for all the mysterious waviHgs, of lanterns and lights and what more likely one? than the one that has just been given. Of course, the experiments liavo not yet succeeded, but then that's no reason why they should libt succeed yet. Scientific men have tho bump of hope largely developed, and, as there is nothing impossible, something may conic of all those strange goings on." The census returns, which, however, arc only approximate, for Waikato district, which includes Waipa, Piako, Raglan, and Kawhia, are set down at 8,000. The Borough of Hamilton does not appear to have progressed, as the return set down (2,000) is the same as that of f 878. In the year 1871 the population of the Waikato was 3,274, so that in the space of tffiii y.oara there have boon added about 300 per cent, to the European population, of the place. Tauratiga district has increased at an unexampled rate during tho last three years, having increased 71 per cent, during that time. Auckland has advanced in the same ratio as is given for the colony :is a r whole. Otagohas rather outstepped tho. average. Canterbury has doubled its population in about nine yearn, And Wellington in a little over eight. J-tawkc's Bay has bee.i more rapid, and T.-iranaki is not much behind it. Nelson and Wesfcland, on tho other hand, have remained nearly stationary, the ono having added about 3,000, and tlioothor 1,000 during tho entire decennial period. 'I he whole Provincial District of Auckland is set down at 1i.i.000. In addition there arc 28,^00 half-eusfey ami ]Mii<>m in the district, which makes up tho total population to I'?3,o00. 'I im population of Ofcago, which includes the annexed province of Southland, is not much uun-a than 7,000, compared with the last available returns, in excess of Auckland. Compared with Canterbury, the excess is 20,000 in favour of Auckland, and something like 6C,000 as regards Wellington.

The s.s. Katikati arrived from To' Puke yesterday afternoon, and' will leave for Katikati this morning. Mr Maclvor writes from Mclbourno that the Sulphur Company for working the White Island deposits will be formed. his Excellency the Governor has licensed Jules George Wilson, Esq., of Cambridge, and R. C. L. Reay, Esq., of Tauranga, to act as interpreters under tho Native Land Court Act, 18S0. Mr R. C. Jordan offers ' himself as a candidate to represent the Katikati Siding in the Tauranga County Council, should Mr Pcrcival Cr<3no tender his resignation as expected. Mr Jordan's address appears in another column. Creditors who have not proved their claims in the estate of Henry Smith, of Tauranga, master mariner, with Mr Thomas Macftarlauc* trustee, are requested to do so on or before the 23rd instant, when a first and final dividend will be payable. The sightasoope will O2>on to-night with an entire change of views. A shipment of new goods having arrived by the steamer, the proprietors express their intention of giving some good prizes away, including, also, a watch and other valuvble- articles.. Professor Eraser left by the s.s. Glenelg last evening. Professor Eraser's visit, notwithstanding the poor attendance at his lectures, has been a success, and we understand that be intends spending a few days here next spring, when he and Mrs Fraser will pay a visit to the Lake District. At a meeting of the Waste Lands Board, it was announced that Messrs Grant and Foster lud notified their willingness to pay tho Agent-General the preliminary deposit of £3,000 inspecting the To Aroha lands, and that tho Premier bad cabled the AgentGeneral to accept the deposit. The members of the Board expressed their satisfaction at so satisfactory a. result. The following visitors are staying at Mcnzics? Tauvanga Hotel— Mr Rhodes, Mr Ludbrook, Major Tisdall, Captain and Mrs Johnson,,. Mr Graham, Mr Craig, Mr Dixon, Mr Knapping, Mr MacPhcrson, Mr Johu Chad wick, Mr Coleman, Mr Dignan, Miss Duncan, Tho Hon. Mr Rowley, Mr Andrews, Mr Tntbill, Mr Clavke, Miss Mclntyre, Miami Mrs Dai ley, Mr .Simpson, Mr Teasdalo. I The steamship Glamia Castle has arrived at Cooktown from Hong Kong, with SSO Chinese passengers, mast of whom are en route for New Zealand. A small consignment of natives of the Flowery Land arrived in Auckland on Thursday. If things go on at this rate, the colony will soon be flooded with Celestials, and the Yellow difficulty may be as troublesome here as it has been found in America. Mr Parker, who lias been appointed teacher of the native school at Ohinemutu, in the room of Mr Creek, removed to Waiomatatini, near Gisborne, arrived hero by the I Glenelg, and, we understand, will leave for the new scene of his labours to-day. Mr Cre"ne, late of Katikati, has, we are informed, , received the appointment of teacher of the I native school near Whangaroa, vacant by the removal of Mr Barker to the Lake District. Our attention has been called to the delays in our local mail service to Opotiki overland. j The native mailman readies Tauranga on i Saturdays, and the mail lies here for four ' days before, going on to Auckland and . Southern ports. It ought to arrive on Tuesdays or Wednesdays, and then it would be in time to catch the Wednesday's steamer, which reaches Auckland i:i time for the Southern steamer by the East Coast for [ Wellington, Duuedin, and Melbourne. It is also ix shame to have valuable mail matter : so destroyed by chafing and wet, as is often , the ca3C in all horse borne mails. Mails ought to be p:\oked on the sides of the horse, and not on the pommel. 'Iho first football match of the season, I '('own v. Country, is to bo played in the Domain Ground to-day, and should create some little interest, as the teams to play outside matches during the season will be picked from those exhibiting the best play in the home games. Play is to commence at 2 p.m. sharp, and it is hoped that those picked, as well ai others who may wish to play, will be on the ground in good time. Ihe teams are : — loivn — Messrs Yates (captain), Andrews, Uoiiuer, Cavauagh, Matthews, Mattier, 0' oore, Philp, Rauroti, Rawiri, Reweti, Tovey, Turner, .Stewart, Stoddard, and i Walter. Country — Messrs Farrcr (captain), Barclay, Barrington, Galbraith, Duncan, I Kensington (2), Tookey, Snodgrass (2), Stevens, Leighton, Vercoe, and Whelan. Tho Bishop of Waiapu, who is to preach in Trinity Church at morning and evening service to-morrow, makes an appeal to the I pcoplo to contribute funds to enabje the ! Rev Ihaia te Ahu to have a suitable building I erected at Ohiuemutu, in which to conduct ! religious services. 'J he want of such a building has long been felt, and the Hey Ihaia, who has been labouring among the Arawas for many years, believes that it would promote the interests of Christianity among that people. Tho Maoris have offered to give a site in n commanding position on the shores of Lake Ilotorua, and aa tho building will be available for service iiv English, as well as in Maori, the Bishop expects that Europeans should contribute liberally t« the work. The appeal will be found in another column. Captain. McGregor, manager of the Northern Steamship Company, accompanied by Mr Thomas Wrigley and Mr W. M. Commons, paid a visit to ' c Puke during this- week. They left in the s.s. Staffa on 'I hnrsday evening, transpipping to tho Katikati at .^faketUj^ndjP^ceeding up the Kaituna river to^alJ^ft'iaOT'junotiorv, tho present landing place for goods for the settlement. From thence tliey proceeded by canoes to Canaan, where the future landing place will bo as soon as tho snagging of the river is completed. Captain McGregor expressed the opinion that the river could readily ha made available fov steamships of light draught as far as Canaau, and we. have reason to believe that his visit will result in an eftbrt being made to utilise the water of the district, 'he assistance- of the County Council would in no. way retard this very necessary work. The following visitors were staying at the Commercial Hotel, Strand, during the past week, — Hon. Mr Marsham, England ; General and Mrs Mitchell, England ; Captain McGregor, Auckland; Mr George iirindlccomb, Victoria ; Mr John Jobson, Alnwiok ; Rev K. W. Young, KdinburghjMr Goold, Edinburgh, Scotland; Mr Fearus, Dunedin; Mr Lewes, Auckland; Captain May, Thames f Mr and Mrs Duncan, Jarana'd ; Mr J Euko, J names; Mr Duglee, Opotiki : Mr AY. Hotley, Cambridge ; Pro. Frasor, Auckland; Mr McDonnell, Katikati; Vr F. S. Hoeing, Katikati ; Mr C. H. Sykes, Te Puke ; Mr W. H. Mathewson, Newcastle-on-Tyno; Captain Kill's, Auckland j Mr J. ljuchnnan, Auckland : Mr J. IT. Taylor, Ohincmutu ; Mr anil MrsCroeke, Ohinemutu; tho Missc'3 Creeko, Ohiuemutu ; Messrs Levey and party, Auckland ; Mr E. M. Campbell ; Mr C'cisslor, Kakikafci ; Mr"Mellao,. Wairoa. In consequence of the illness of some of tho.se that had arranged to participate in the amateur concert, announced to bo held in tho Temx^pranco Hall on Thursday evening, the concert had to be postponed tiil the 2b'th instant. Mrs Esultiile, a lady who hns taken a great intercut in making the entertainment a succsss, h.i-j been suffering from a severe cold, and, though up to noon on hnrsday she expected to bo able to carry out. hor part of the programme, she was so ill as to bo unable, to appear. As others also wore; iiulisp.>scd, it was deemed advisable to postpone tho concert f<n" a week, in order to eiioiiro its success. 'J lie postponement caused grsat disappointment, n-i man}' had come from a distance to atten.l. The tickets already sold j will be available for Thursday night. Tho promoters hope that their effort will result in raising as much as will enable the Committee of the Mechanics' Institute to make a substantial addition to the library.

English society papers mention thojrdnother marriage is arranged between a lady'Sf "(nature age, much wealth acquired, by brewing^ %nd well known for her. charities, and a young gentleman who is only a little above tvveiity • years old. ' -, Considerable interest, appears to be manifested in the 'forthcoming sculling match between Hearne, of Wellington, and White, of Mercury Bay. It will be pulled off at Wellington on the 9th of July. A meeting of Hearne's supporters was held at the Pier Hotel on Friday night, when the\amount of the challenge money, viz., £100, wasfguaranteed in the room. — New Zealand Tdme&* The candidates who passed at the April Civil Service examinations included Benry Edward Elliott, of Opotiki, (educated at the Government school there for 3£ years, and by a private tutor for 2£ years), and Fred. George Dalziel, of New Plymouth, (educated at the Tauranga District School 4 years, and 3 £ elsewhere). Mr Elliott took the secosd place with 309 marks In English, 449 in arithmetic, 300 history, 224 geography, and 200 in Maori ; total 1,482. Mr Dalziel go the sixth place with 223 marks in English, 337 arithmetic, 240 history, and 273 geography ; total 1,082. The maximum number, of, marks attainable was 3, COO.

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THE Bay of Plenty Times, Bay of Plenty Times, Volume X, Issue 1043, 21 May 1881

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THE Bay of Plenty Times Bay of Plenty Times, Volume X, Issue 1043, 21 May 1881

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