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Saw Heaven in a Trance

. TAUS OF PENTEOO3TAL VISION

rjfte members of the etout little Penj^tal Church in Utica Avenue, Brooklyn, says the ' New York World ' -fuse to be either excited or angry . rer the statements of Mrs Goodttle, nC e a member of the church, that the ii panifea tations " which frequently kke place at the religious meetings are caused by the hypnotic suggestion of the # cv William Howard Hoople instetid of by the Spirit of the Holy Ghost.

"There was a time," cay they, (i ff jiea wo would have got angry. But gince we have received the Bccond inversion, which is there is peace and joy in our souls flbich cannot be destroyed by any attacks instigated by the devil. We fc Q ow that we have seen the face of God. Let people say what they will It does not disturb us. God in His own good time will make all things plain." Miss Paulin Vauclair is one of the youug women of the church who were alleged by Mm Goodale to be subject to the pastoi's strange influence. She does not deny that she has been under B orne 8 range and unusual spell, but ascribes it ail to the Holy Spirit. She is a young woman who does not court publicity. But she does not shrink fom sanding a3 a witness to her God and her religion. She is a deaconess in the church, a dark-eyed young woman, with ft face expressive of a strongly emotional nature. She lives with hei 1 mother at No. 1721, Bergenstreet, and in her pleasant home related her experiences modestly, but with evident baiief in the truth of every word she utoared. " This t-lk uf Dr Hoople being a hypaocV, is absurd," she said; " The statements made by Mrs Goodule are born of a desire to do cur lit' le congregations harm beciuse we will uob permit her to rejoin us. It is the spirit of God which inspirt s us to act as we do, and Pastor Hoople has no moie to do with it than you have.

"If I tell you that I have been to heaven and walked with Jesus you v. ill doubtles3 scoff. But it ia

true." There was no questioning the sincerity of the woman. That she had walked with God was beyond question in her mind. She related her experience as she had done before while the congregation knelt at the altar, singing and praying alternately, while men fell prone and women fainted, and many saw visions tbat seemed to come from heaven. "It was at the time my father died," she said, " some months sgo. I was at his bed-side, as were other members of the church. As my father parsed away someone at the bedside said, ' Amen, 1 and at that instant I eauk to the floor unconscious I was not really to. It wai only my body that was unconscious. I fell my fou] borne up. It soenued to be floatiug away from earth, far out into thn darkness of space. Suddenly, from oat of the impenetrable darkness which inrrounds me, a fair, white hand was

laid upon my own. Then a voice, the sweetness of which still lingers wih me, ottered one word, ' Come.' The darkness," Miss V*uclair continued 'faded away to give place to a bright. neas the like of which I have never R?n on earth. Then I beheld the features of my guide, and knew that it Wai the Christ. 'Father,' I ex claimed, and He bent upon me a look of love and an3wer?d : ' Come ; and thou ehalt see what it is that is promised thee.' Fiocks of angels came lad hovered around, singing, oh ! so beautifully. We entered the gateß of h ! ;ivn and walked through streets all crowded with little children who ran before ug and flew about us like flocks of doves." " Did you reo giise any faces that you hew?" asked the reporter. "Many Of them," replied Miss Vauclair. " I aw onp woman there who had prayed for my salvation on earth. I rememher particularly, ' And thou hast Wtne at last ?' she said as she came to me eagerly. Bui Jesu3 raised His land w,;rning!y and said, ' It is even & Bit s'io will return again with messages to the faithful on earth. Teen He lid me to the gates and me through the light into fte darkness, where He left, me."

Miaa V Midair stated that a number °f the church had been blessed with foilir experiences. She said that the tances did not always take place in l ta preaenco of Pastor Hoople. They J ere not connected in any way with to presence or absence. Several mem of the church are well to do. the oi is Pastor Hoople. He is c son of a wealthy leather merchant. & j work in the church is a work of He receives no salary. The ■i"le church he bailt and paid for * l ft his own money. He is described *** Urge man with a commanding teence and great earnestness of "toner. There are five Pentecostal

churches in Brooklyn and fifteen altogether, all offahoots from the parent church, which is the one in Utica Avenue. "Pastor Hoople possesses no power save that which comes of the Holy Ghost," said one of the deacons fervently.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/BH18970727.2.10

Bibliographic details

Saw Heaven in a Trance, Bruce Herald, Volume XXVIII, Issue 2880, 27 July 1897

Word Count
893

Saw Heaven in a Trance Bruce Herald, Volume XXVIII, Issue 2880, 27 July 1897

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