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THE FUNERAL.

The interment of twenty-eight of the dead took place on Sunday. The other bodies were taken by t ain to Dunedin and Green Island, and there interred by their friends and relatives. A special train ran on Sunday to Kaitangata and from Dunedin, Green Island, Waihola, Stirling, and Balclutha, numbers came to join in showing how widely the anguish caused by the accident had spread. The Rev. Father Larkins, Roman Catholic Priest of Dunedin, was in attendance to perform the necessary offices for those of the departed who belonged to his Church. Shortly after 12 o'clock, the tolling of the church bell announced that tbe melancholy ceremony was about to begin, and eight drays left the building in which the dead had been coffined, carrying each the remains of two of the departed. Eight<md-twenty graves dug closely side by side, lay open for the reception of the coffins, and perhaps, the most melancholy sight of all was the turning back of the drays after they had left their first loads at a short distance from the cemetery gates to receive a second. As the coffins were deposited on wooden bars stretched across the open graves, the Rev W. Ronaldson repeated the words, " The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away : blessed be the name of the Lord." The bodies of those who had belonged to the Roman Catholic Church were met at the cemetery gate by the Rev Father Larkin, of Dunedin, who performed the service for the dead according to the practice of his Church. The Rev Mr Ronaldson then read a portion of the Church of England burial service— the 39th Psalm, and the 15th chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians, from the 20th verse. The Rev. J. Chisholm afterwards addressed the assemblage. He said : My dear friends, I have been asked to address you shortly on this mournful occasion. I am sure Ido but express in words what

yduall'feel-whfen l "^y'thfet-thiscal^ity,r Avhich hWfef^m^ ... ;■ ; less , anjiii many _,- a. c wlfeV jn^mingj- nag* stunned us all to our hearts. lam sure s we ; all pity --frith the utmost 1 intensify: those ywlio have been bereaved a 'of rtheira " ;l husbands ¥nd ! of 1 thHr^fathera. think of the present .grief, thtifc- lias to be. borne— when we think of v the' sehse of lonelineas-that will settle down when tlie first greafc excitement is oyerTrrwhln ywei think of- the.; toilsome, weary days that ■ will have to be spent? by these widows 'us,* fwe'-'may well 'feel full of/ pity And shall we, my friends, imagine fpr[ a single moment tbat..arGod.V.whp:h'uVmaiei oiir hearts capable of such pityi looks upt|n : them with utter indifference;?- He thjit ; fpi*med. an eye, shall ; Be not" see ? ije ,< that formed a human heart Y and made jit capable of such feeling, shall He not feel-H shaUVHe not 'look AvithAintense- pity ; aiid V sympathy for thbse'who. . are now" left f° A lonely and sohelpless? Ikbowwhat questions wiil arisein the thoughtful mind when suchacalamity asthisoccurs. IsthereaGoA; in heaven, all-mighty; all-preseitt, mdst wise, most holy, most loving, when such calamities occur in a world thatispre-i served and Governed by Him ? I knpw such qhestibhs kre asked: not . here at present tb j ustiiy the ways bf Gpd to man* — I am not here to account for kll Gods , dealings. I believe there is i a mystery in such a dealing as this, fpr instance, which we cannot unriddle. ; I believe that there. are natural -laws, ahd that when these natural laws are crossed* er violated, punishment is entailed. ButI also believe that tbe Infinite Onehfas a* natural law, and transcends it. V "Donatural laws tend to fetter His free will? No ; tbey are methods in accordance with! which He works-— lines along which His energy moves. .G-od is law, -say ihe wise*.; 1 so let us rejoice. 'Closer is He- thani breath, and nearer than hauds and feet. Whilst, then, we cannot unravel such! a; mystery as this-^and we '^ would need ito; be gods to clear up -all the venigmas>of life and make plain all these mysteries — We j believe that God is over all, ] and: that 'in '■ so me way or other He is working , out His kind purposes. Now we know in pare, prophesy in part, but ' wh en tli at which is perfect is . cone, we shall know even ..as :we . are : . known. Now we. see as through a glass, darkly, but then faceito face. -And there abide three things : faith — not knowledge, .-• not sight — •>. hope and love, and the greatest of these is love ; and. he ;that loveth not knoweth not God, for God is love. And this calamity does furnish us with an occasion lor tbe exercise of this love, which shall lead us into a clearer and fuller knowledge of that God aboire us whose name is love. This calamity. I am sure, is meant to teach us come great and important lesson., : Ihope there i 8 not one of us so uncharitable; as to suppose that those who have suffered, — those wboee.bodies are now lying beside vs — were greater sinners than others be** cause they have so suffered. I think our Lord and Saviour most conclusively rebukes such a spirit as that. On one memorable occasion, ycu remember, there came to Him certain Galilean*, when He asked if it was supposed that these Galileans were sinners above all Galileans. He said tbey ,we : pc not, and that except we repented, .we .should all perish. We haye no right to measure men's sins by the severity of the afflictions which come upon tbem. But what does this teach ? ; It teaches thiß- idea — the uncertainty of life. Scripture, on almost every page, tells us that our life here is uncertan— , but a vapour, a shadow, flitting away ere you can point its place or grasp it. We know not what a day may bring forth. Oh ! we are willing enough, all ofj us, to asaeiit to that general truth— we are quite willing to admit that man is mortal and. life uncertain.; and whilst thus assenting, how slow we are to make a speciarapplicatibri of the truth to our/ selves. Let us' realise- the uncertainty of life, for if we do, then surely shall we set about preparing for judgment and eternity. We are not all prepared for death, I think — Scripture emphasises this fact, but I need scarcely repeat in your ears what you 'have heard from, childhood, that alt have sinned and come short of the glory of God; that there is none righteous — no, not one.; We differ very much, as we stand here,, in form and feature— We differ in the complexion of our mental and: moral natrue, in our attainments, in our social standing., But God's Word goes below all this surface difference. It looks upon. us. as men, and sees that there is, no difference in this respecL— -that all have sinned and cuine sHo'-t i f tho elory ofjEj-pd. Do we assent tothat truth ? Are we, willing o make a special application of it P, , The ' Word of God declares — and lamnpt-here to utter guesses or to specula,te,— in awful acceot.tha}; the wages of sin is death. , My , friends,, the Gospel .comes in now,, and -' brings *?ladv tidingsindeed—^-God so loved the world that he gave His only begotten to die. for us, poor sinners; and we. are promised that whosoever believeth in the Lord Jesus Christ shall not perisb, but have eternal \lifeA. l beseech you, then| my friends, in yiew^pf' the uncertainty of life, to yield yourselves to Christ even now ju'et as jou 'are^'wltnout bhe plea, but.;; that his blood wasVslied for you.' 'Hesays:* "Without Me you can do' ;nbtii.ing.'' V Withputv'Ciinst death wiil' he 'pad indeed ; withpuVliimf life ': cannbt VDe'^rofiVtJ-ible. With i'Hi'm r iy matter 8 hot where you! die* i —whether y ; OU are 'buried, ihVyoUr shottedhammock ehroud, or/whefher ypu : die , -. 1 witfrf^^^ tp moisten ] [■AA you^parched^.lips^ "'and.triTnj'ster ! to'- yoUi*; ■) A ' wants; * To' the widows;' ! afound me I '. J wOiild say) 1 thiPk pfYrJim s whb stppd and ; ; j wept at the' grate. 1 of Lfkkarus;in sympathy with th|p f bereaved- sisters;^ ' bjf : Vßethah*y ;' : : thfhk .6^ hisYfehd'er cpmpayßipn- : ;ah'd ; care < for the '■'' 'children/"' Oiye -mpthtirsl and re-" ; u ih|mher' tbi6 'He L is* the- same'* ; y e'sterdtiy, ;J .j L ' i; i*id¥yfatfd tb-mbtrdw^ 0D j s-'- ai -' • <

,-; v oiV; though >now-i ascended up*j on high, >y -,] .-. },-., ri ..ri Hefbends on.earth a.brother's eye : ; ■; i - Partaker of the human name, ( iV AM'still^re^iSnflWßrs in^esktek, ■" '■'■'■ ■a axa", oJlis^tearajr and' agonies, and; cries - ■ •j ted b^^ o^^?^*!?*^*?^*'.-.^??^* *ho.hewrt. ■■ .; .. j r -Ths man of .sorrows had a part"; ■•' '■- : Ly : 'H* sy^a^es^kb r. '* ,* •-• A ■; And tb^thVsu&erer sehdslrelief." ,; - Oii'! ( iet~us all, theu, look 'to Jesus, the , worlds hope. vh These c open, graves, these i coffins, surely I 'preach M'Vmore eloquently than ha man. words cm do. 1 beseech you again, by the Jbroa tbfit loves you ; by Christ, who died for 'ypu; fetid 'the. 1 Holy GhosS wtio 'is striviDgfbr vob — to, !Y'<-;.t!|i . •*aAii.«yi. sir ,f>7f)r it* ■"> -if ■ V yield now to Jesus, and never throughout ypur 1 ife will h eileeer t y bu/ I prity G-od '.' . that 'thiß occasion may heiblessea'to all. of 1 "us] and while it affords scope for the 4 ] ' exercise of love and vsy mpWtihy . and a bestowal ofhelpta those who have' been bereaved of their bread winners, TJ would have ybu remember that' ,J God , has some phrpose of; His Wh r in* this calamity^ and I^trus't'/wW shall all .take to ! ' heart the lessons it is in'tffcn ded to teach. ' :,; * Aftera prayer by the ! J Rev ; . Mr "Allan," V the coffins were lowered - ' into' the' graves, ! and the number 'assembled at 'the furieral dispersed, the spebial i;raih ! leaving for' Dunedih at half-bkst three n c(' clock. ''*"'"'

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Bibliographic details

THE FUNERAL., Bruce Herald, Volume XI, Issue 1091, 25 February 1879

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1,636

THE FUNERAL. Bruce Herald, Volume XI, Issue 1091, 25 February 1879

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