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The Bruce Herald,. "Nemo me impune lacesset." TOKOMAIRIRO, SEPTEMBER 14, 1875.

In searchiug the annals of Colonial Parliaments, it would be difficult to find a record of anything more disreputable than the action taken by the minority iv the House of Representatives, with a view to prevent the passage of the Bill for the abolitiou of the Provinces during the present session. When first the abolition measure was brought before the House, the Provincialists saw that the fate of the present form of Government was sealed, and endeavored, by talking in a bouncible manner, to frighten the Ministry into abandoning their expressed intention of carrying the measure through the General Assembly without unnecessary de lay. The weakness of the Opposition was then apparent, notwithstanding their boasted strength, and the Government refused tQ be frightened. Then there were the threats thai betrayed a consciousness of weakness on the part of the opppuenfs pf the Bill, and we were told that eyery constitutional means' would be usgd to prevent its passage this session, and that should all their other tactics fail, the Opposition were quite prepared to resort to the parliamentary dodge of "speaking against time," in oi'dgr that in the event of the Ministry not giving vyay, the present Parliament might expire by effluxion of time before the Abolition measure could b<3 carried. The Government expressed their intention of being firm iv the matter, and stated that they would devote three or four months to the Bill if necessary, but at the time it was scarcely thought probable that the Opposition ever intended to carry their threat into execution, L?n Thursday, however, the " speaking agaiusfc time " cQmmencgd., and although there are a few men belonging io I the Provincialist party from whom we might baye expected anything in the shape of factious opposition m my measure that did not happen to please them, there are men on the same side, have hitherto borne unsullied political reputations, snd wjiom we are sorry to see in such bad company. We think it unwise to encourage the sort of opposition that has been offered to the Bill for the ftbplititm of tbe Province j and sooner

than see the Government coerced into granting a delay which they assert to be unnecessary, we w.ould rather have the battle fought out to the end. It will be seen by the summary of the Parliamentary proceedings, published elsewhere, that at eight o'clock on Friday night the Native Minister announced that certain proposals Lad been made to the Government by u the Opposition, regarding the question at issue, and it was decided that the House should adjourn until this day in order that these proposals might be considered. On Saturday, meetings of Government supporters and members of the Opposition were held, and it appears that the proposals of the Opposition were : That the Governor should not give his assent to the passing of the Bill except on the following terms : Admitting that the principle of abolition has been affirmed by the House "of Representatives, the Bill is to be proceeded with in a fair spirit of discussion, so as to render it as perfect a measure as possible, and that a clause shall be inserted providing that the Act shall only come into operation by a resolution to that effect being passed by both Houses of the Legislature in the first session of the new Parliament. The Opposi- ( tion also offered to agree that such arrangements should be made as would satisfy the Colonial Government that no undue advantage of the position would be taken in the meantime by the Provincial Legislatures. The counter proposals of the Government were that the Abolition Bill should be passed this session, with a provision that it should only take effect ou a day to be named by proclamation by the Governor, but that no such proclamation should be issued should a resolution of eitheT House of the Legislature to the contrary, be introduced within one month after the meeting of the next Parliament, and passed before the close of the session. The Government also proposed that the Provincial administration should continue until the Act was so proclaimed, that the appropriations" for [departmental purposes should be continued by ,the Assembly at the present rate, and that the public works already authorised by Provincial Councils should be undertaken, but that no Provincial Council should meet again unless the Act lapsed. We heard last night that these counter propositions of the Government had been accepted by the Opposition, and that a great deal of discontent existed amongst Government supporters in consequence. We must say that we share in this discontent and disappointment to a considerable extent. We have not the slightest fear that the system of Provincial Government will be perpetuated by the new Parliament ; but, on the contrary, are of opinion that the members of the General Assembly who take their seats in Wellington in 1876 will nearly all be pledged abolitiouists. What we object to is that so much of the present session should have been wasted in merely affirming the principle of abolition, and that the introduction of a new and better system of Government should be delayed for [another 3 r ear. With a lively recollection of the way in which some of the Provincial Councils have been in the habit of appropriating during a single session, amounts almost equal to twice their revenue, we doubt the advisability of trustiug the Provincial Executives with power to carry out the works that the Councils have authorised. In fact, the only one of the proposals with which Aye heartily agree is that no Provincial Council shall meet again unless the Abolition Act lapse. At a late hour last night we were informed by telegram from Wellington that the Government can do nothing without first consulting their party, raid that it is quite probable that no such agreement as that referred to above will be come to. We sincerely hope that this will prove to be the case.

A short debate took place in the House of representatives on Thursday last on the second reaxling of the Telegraph Messages Copyright Bill, and the matter will come up for discussion again in a few days. We have not a copy of the Bill before us, but can say without hesitation that the measure is one that will be oppressive to up-country newspapers, while the proprietors of those journals published in the largest centres of population will be considerably benefited. At the present time there is. not the slightest necessity for the establishment of a copyright in telegraph messages or news of any kind, and we should be surprised jf the measure that has been introduced in the General Assembly ever gets beyond its present stage. It must be patent to everyone that small up-country papers cannot afford to make the same use of the telegraph in supplying- thejr readers with news as their richer contemporaries, but \ye maintain that the proprietors of the larger journals are amply repaid fc.r their enterprise by the long start they necessarily get in the circulation of Late intelligence. At the present i time the arrangements of the Telegraph Department of I^evy Zealand are most liberal with regard to the transmission of Tress messages, ajaxl fig fhe concessions granted to newspapers are really paid fpr by the public, we cannot see wh)' the city journals should alone be the gainers. Many iip-country papers are unable to avajl themselves qf even the present low rates for messages, and when the Dunedin newspaper proprietors, who can well afford to make extensive use of the x/irp§ have reaped all the benefits obtained by an eariy publication 01 the nnesS,y s 'S, we think they should be content to allow their weaker brethren to make use of the telegrams. At the present time they virtually haye v a monopoly qr'then?\vs ftjr a whole day., and thus receive a fair return for the expense they have been put to. When there is direct telegraphic communication between Nevy Zealand and Europe, there may be some .Shadow of a reason why a copyright Act

should be passed for the protection of those newspaper proprietors who pay large suras foi European" telegrams, but now they have at much protection as they can fairly ask for. We Ime to acknowledge the receipt of a number of Parliamentary papers from the Government Printer. The 'Guardian' says that the entire horse Young Emperor, bred by Mr Robert Muir, North Tnieri, changed hands on Saturday at a sum oi £300. Mr John Murchison was the purchaser. The work on the Kaitangata Branch Railway has been carried on very energetically. The length of the line is about four miles and a half, and most of the formation has been completed. Some forty Chinamen, and a number of Europeans, are now at wort at the junction with the main line at Stirling. We are informed that the quality of the work that has been done is excellent. The Union Company's new steamer Taupo arrived at Port Chalmers from Wellington on Sunday. A Dunedin contemporary says: — "We hear that the s.s, Taupo touched on the Fish Reef at about 10.15 a.m. yesterday, and, consequently, will be hauled into tho Graving Dock this forenoon, to undergo a thorough overhaul, in ordor to ascertain if any damage has been sustained thereby." We are pleased to observe that Mr Conyers, the General Manager of the Otago Railways, is doing his best to make the newly opened lines a still greater convenience to the travelling public. A new regulation came into force yesterday, by which return tickets issued for distances over 30 miles will be available for the return journey on the following clay, and those issued on Saturday will be available for tho return journey on the Monday following. A cuhiotts slip, at least so the ' Athenaoum ' presumes it to be, occurs in a catalogue issued a short tune ago, by a well - known bookseller. A work on xylography-block printing at the beginning of the 15th century, is catalogued, which is said to contain sixty-nine engravings either from wood or metal, twelve of which bear inscriptions, representing scenes of Christian mythology, figures of patriarchs, saints, " devils, and other dignitaries of the Church." The ' Tribune,' writing of Mr Stout's proceedings in tho House of Representatives on Wednesday, says: — "Last night he persisted in dividing the House in Committee, time after time, although he knew his own party disagreed with him. The whole thing was a trifle, but he persistently made a mountain of a molehill, and having read an erudite writer, and, we fear, somewhat misunderstood his abstruse philosophy, he must needs take occasion to air it to show his profundity and his aptitude at making inapt comparisons. It was melancholy to see him drag Sir George Grey at his heels, with one other member, as the headstrong minority of three, against a trifling matter, which had been virtually set at rest before division. A modest lawyer is an impossible phase in practical life ; but still, if Mr Stout expects to justify the favorable opiniou which heralded his advent to the House, ho will take a friendly hint and speak seldomer, a little more to the point, and endeavor to believe that neither the House nor tho public care very much — many of them not a rush — for his abstruse principles, which make him divide on mere moonshine pretexts." Os the 15th of June the Presbyterians of the Dominion of Canada united into one church, embracing 700 ministers and congregations, 100,000 communicants, 500,000 adherents, and extending from Newfoundland on tho east, to British Columbia on the west. The four bodies which united were the Canada Presbyterian Church, the Synod of Canada in connection with the Church of Scotland, tho Synod of the Lower Provinces, aiad the Synod of the maritime Provinces. The was a large attendance of ministers and elders, -numbering about 900. The audience was about 5000. The plaoe of meeting was the Skating Rink of Montreal. The Itov. Dr Cook was unanimously elected the first moderator. A telegram from the Assembly of the Irish Presbyterian Church was received congratulating the meeting on the union. At a social ireeting held in tho evening, at which Principal Dawson, of M'Gill University, presided, 4000 persons were present. The choir numbered 100. The speeches were excellent. Congratulations from the Diocesan Synod of Montreal were conveyed by Dr Oxenden, the metropolitan. The Diocesau Synod did the same. The Methodist Conference sent greetings, as did the Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of the United States. The United Church has four colleges, with good faculties of theological professors. All iv the first Assembly was delightful, breathing the spirit of devotion to God, and love to the far-extending brotherhood. We are pleased to be able to announce (says the ' Tuapeka Times ') that cartain much-needed impvovements have been made, and are now all but completed, upon the main line of road passing through Manuka Creek. Persons who have travelled this road cannot fail to be aware of tho fact that the bridges over the Creek hare for the most part been built nt right angles to the road, which nt this place (being for the most part closely confined by rocky embankments) makes the danger to heavily-laden teamsters all the more imminent. At one of these bridges a sad mishap occurred some twelve or eighteen months ago, whereby a waggon was precipitated over the embankment, and the driver killed on the spot. Tho water channel at this bridge has been provided for by a good large culvert some 80ft long, tho entire roadway being made up from the arch of the culvert, so that tho actual breadth qf tho passage is now something considerable. The face of the arch stands some Sft off the square, and. by that means the road-live cuts off all the acute angles that previously existed. In other words, the rond has been carried out in nearly a direct line, Sy. that much of the danger hitherto associated with this read may now be sa|d to be obviated. Before it can be called perfectly safe, however,^ one or two more of these biiJges will have to be improve. 1 in a similar manner ; — She bridge over the sixth crossing from this end in particular. The woi'k | could be lighter afc this spqt than at the other. A culvert not more than 60 feet long would enable the roadway to be made up in a perfectly straight line. The suggestion should rece;vo early attention from tiie Itoad Engineer. Commenting on the Queen's message of condolence to Mrs Goodenough, the Sydney 'Echo' makes the following remarks : — " Another column contains one nf those items cf i^cv,-,a vi.Uich, in the auna'ls of England, belong only to the reign of our present 'gracious Queen. Long ago it was said that 'a messago came from England,' It came to those who weso fighting for England's glory, to the sick and dying in the hospitals in the Crimea, arid tp all who took part iv that struggle. The response was, ' God bless Eng-. land, and God bless England's Queeu ;' and now, after a lapse of years, we have reason to reiterate it from 4.ustralia, where the message haa conic — not to a warrior, but to a widow. Such touches of nature as this have mac]e tip name of \'-ictaria honored and tieloved, not merely by British subjects, but by those who can appreciate all the attributes that ennoble tho woman, apart from her dignity as Queen. The sympathy thus shown to the bereaved iady who now l^ruents hqr wa/c---rior dead must; he doubly consoling, coming so promptly and from such a distance. It will show , to her that, the loss she lias sustained is felt by those who best know the value of a tried and faithful servant. If there is anything that will help to compensate her for her loss, it is bUCjh testimony conveyed in a brier message oi sympathy which the electric 1 fluid has flashed from old England to the newer England in the southern seas ; and while the former h^?. *ra tljrpne |Ulsd by such a \y.e need not fear thit aught can ever break the link which binds mother and daughter. : The message sent tq Mrs Goodenough will make Au^ti^ii^ prouder of the mother iaijd — prouder, still of such a Sovereign — and evoke again the prayer which went up from, the trenches of Sebastopql and from the hospitals , of Scutari — • Qod bjess England's Queeu.' " '

It is expected that the Taranaki, with the San Francisco mail on board, -will arrive at Port Chalmers this morning. A meeting of those interested in the formation of a gymnastic club at Milton will be held at the Commercial Hotel to-night. We are glad to hear that Mr Barr, Engineer and Surveyor, Dunedin, is taking the permanent levels of the main streets of Balclucha. This ia very much needed, and it is to be regretted it was not done before. Mb Joseph Robertson, Balclutha, sold his Temperance Hotel last week to Mr Keenan, of the Waverly Boarding House, Dunedin. The price was £1500. We understand that Mr Keenan will apply for a license. The Kestrel, Huon Belle, Jane Campbell, Dagmar, and three other vessels are now lying in Catlin's River. The Franklin Belle is also there, undergoing an overhaul. The Spec, now on Manuka Point, was surveyed on Monday, and will probably soon be repaired. At Oamaru, on the 18th and 19th of November, the Northern Agricultural and Pastoral Association will hold their twelfth annual exhibition of live stock, dairy produce, agricultural implements, &c. A list of the principal prizes is published in our advertising columns. In another column will be found an advertisement in which Mr Edwin N. Legge announces his intention of disposing of the well-known Helensbrook Estate. The estate will bo divided into building sites in such a way as to suit the convenience of purchasers. The sale will take place about the end of next month. We are informed that Mr Harry Yeend, the well-known couch proprietor and driver, has sold out to Chaplin and Co., who will in future conduct the coach traffic between Balclutha and Mutaura. Mr Yeend has always been a favorite "on the road," and his friends will be pleased to hear of his success in whatever new venture he takes in hand. The Wellington 'Tribune' remarks that an opinion seems to be growing that the Judges of the Supreme Court will shortly be concentrated in Wellington, with periodical circuits throughout the Colony, but adds : — " We are not aware that there is any reason for this opinion at present, beyond the conviction that such a change would be very desirable. It will come, but hardly for some little time yet." A correspondent of the ' Guardian ' telegraphs that the public opening of the Mataura Railway from Invercargill to Q-ore, will take place next Wednesday. The Mayor has invited the citizens to observe the occasion as a general holiday. Excursion tickets will be issued at 3s each, the distance being 80 miles there and back. It is astounding that notwithstanding her enormous coal resources, New Zealand, for the year ending 30th June last, imported coal to the value of nearly half-a-million sterling ; the amount was 264,359 tons, value £440,995. Auckland was the smallest importer among the Provincial cities, owing no doubt to the Bay of Islands supply. The ' WaDganui Herald ' notices that Dr Bradford, whose recent elopement with a Victorian heiress will be remembered, lias advertised his I intention to apply for permission to practise as a medical man. The same paper considers that being something of a lion Dr Bradford will soon secure a numerous connection, especially as his qualifications have already been well advertised gratuitously. A soiree, concert, and ball, in aid of local charities, took place at the Southbridge Schoolhouse on Friday night. There was a large attendance, and the affair passed off most successfully. Mrs Goodall provided tea and refreshments. At the entertainment that followed, Mr Cunningham took the chair, and then Messrs Bryce, Bastings, Atkinson, Mathewson, J. Allison, Dale, J. Frazer, and Andrews, gave a number of songs and recitations, which seemed to be highly appreciated by the audience. After a vote of thanks had been accorded to the Chairman ami those who had given their services, the room was cleared, and a dance took place. A concert of sacred music took place in the Volunteer Hall, Inch Clutha, on Friday last. About thirty ladies and gentlemen took part in the entertainment, and the Eev Mr Allan, of Stirling, took the chair. The ilrst part of the entertainment consisted of the reading of selections from Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, interspersed with songs illustrating the passages read. Then followed the singing of a number of anthems, several of Sankey's hymns, and other sacred music. Mr lteid acted as conductor, the choir having been under his care for some time past. After the Eev, Mr Allan had delivered an appropriate address, the ooucert terminated by the singing of the Evening Hymn. A similar concert took place at Kaitangata on Monday evening. "That multitudinous comedian," the intelligent compositor — to quote Max Adder — does some funny things sometimes. The other day we wrote two paragraphs, one stating that a gymnasium was to be opened, and the other that I Messrs Reid, Mackintosh, Hislop, and Dutlne were collecting subscriptions for rv pooi-. man named Daniel Council. ISqth paragraphs were published, bu.p in a rather mixed condition, as it was mado to appear that the gontlouien named were collecting for the gymnasium, We learn from the ' Times ' that for some time past a correspondence has been carried $n amongst men of literary tastes in d;Sei«nt parts o^ the Colony, with the 7-iew of bringing out a magazine \v ui ?M slia U su .PPl7i periodically, to the, puhfac' of New Zealand tha.t kind of reading nutter which our. friends at Home meet with in felie pages of ' Macmillan,' the ' Fortnightly,' &c. The title will be ' The New Zealand Magazine/ and the first number will be issued about the Ist of January. The editqrs will be five in number ; they ars r t s fotiqws : — G. S. Sale, M.A., Professor qf Classics and English Language and literature, OtaiKQ University ; D. M^cgyegoiv MA., M.8., Professor of Mental aad Moral Philosophy, Otago University ; J. M. Brown, M.A., Professor of Classics, Canterbury College ; Rev 11. L. Stanford , M.A. ; and F. W. Hutton, F.G.S., C.M.is.S. It is intended that the inae^ins, which, in, the first iustaiice^ vfill l»e issued quarterly, shall, in general appearance, resemble the 'Contemporary Fjoview.' The annual meeting ci \he Bruce Cricket Club was helr\ at the Commercial Hotel, on Saturday night. Mr Malcolm in the chair. The attcn* dance was not so large as it should have been. The balance sheet showed that the Club was m a satisfactory position, and the working eommittoe presented a report, stating that in enormity with tho resolutions passed f,t the last meeting, they had succeeded in leasing a piece of ground frqta Irir James Elder Brown, afe -i reni.ii of £1 per annum. They had also expended £8 4a 6d in ienoing, and otherwise improving the ground. To meet this outlay, the township had been ean-. vassed, and £8 5s had been caN^eled in half-, crown subscriptions. An £1 ha.d been prom.is.erj. T-he aor^uu'Uee had personally done a good deal of- work on the ground, and had only been assisted by one or two other members of the Club. It was suggested on behalf of the futy^-Q working committee that they shouJrl be assisted, in the laborious work of fqynyug. th,o new ground, This repor*; the Club rules were (submitted, passed, and ordered fca be printed. The following officers weya elected, Mr Joseph Mackay, Preside:^ j Mr Malcolm, Vice-Proaidont ; Mr George Dicksou, Captain j and Mr A. M'Kechnie, Practice Captain ; Mr J. Evans, Secretary ; and Messrs King, Currie, James Grc,n.v> Lane, Butt, and Pettjt, working committee. Mr J. J. Atkinaon promised to pyesent a new bat to. the m,einber of the Club who made the highest aggregate score in the matches played during the coming season. Practice will be commenced on Saturday next on the Recrea^. tioi; Gkovwd,,

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Bibliographic details

The Bruce Herald,. "Nemo me impune lacesset." TOKOMAIRIRO, SEPTEMBER 14, 1875., Bruce Herald, Volume VIII, Issue 734, 14 September 1875

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4,051

The Bruce Herald,. "Nemo me impune lacesset." TOKOMAIRIRO, SEPTEMBER 14, 1875. Bruce Herald, Volume VIII, Issue 734, 14 September 1875

Working