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OPENING OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

His Excellency the Governor, Sir George Grey, formally opened the General Assembly July 26th ; at two o'clock. The Volunteers of the city, under charge of Majdi Gorton, formed a guard of honor, aric received his Excellency at the entrance o; the building. ;^ = ; :

. -; : The inclemency of the weather rendered the display much' less brilliant than it would have ; been under more favourable circumstanpes. '..'.-. The hall of . the, Legislative Council was crowded with a .most influential assemblage andj although 'the unpropitions state of the day prevented the ladies from appearing in very large numbers, there was a large attendance. After. the usuaj preliminary ceremonies, his. Excellency opened the General Assembly with the following speech : — ; Honorable Gentlemen of the. Legislative Council, and Gentlemen of the House .;.-,; of, Representatives, — ■ In opening' this fifth Session of the present Parliament of New Zealand, I am able to congratulate you upon the partial establishment of peace, and the suppression of- insurrection in several of the disturbed districts in this island. "I trust, Whilst,devising means -for the repression of outrages which still occur, you will at the same time consider how to ensure the future ; peace of the, country, and promote the i union of the, two races by facilitating the admission of her Majesty's subjects of the ! Native race to a full and equal participation in the , privileges of self-govern-ment. : It is my intention to invite certain Native Chiefs to meet at Wellington, and a Bill will be laid before you, enabling- me to appoint from among them a Commission to report and; advise upon the; best means of obtaining a Parliamentary representation of the Native race. : The" Resolutions passed by your respective Chambers in the last Session of the General Assembly, relative to the withdrawal from the Colony of Her Majesty's Land Forces, were duly transmitted by me to Her Majesty's Secretary of State. From the tenor of my. most recent" despatches, I am led to infer that the policy agreed to by you. has been 1 approved ofj and will be fully -adopted by the Home Government. The Taranaki and Wanganui country, has long been a focus cf disaffection and fanaticism:-. ; Peace cannot be real or lasting which is not preceded by the establishment of Her Majesty's authority in these districts, to b& permanently secured by the opening of roads and the formation of self-defending settlements. Pending the decision of the Home Government,. I determined therefore to avail myself of the services ot: a, portion of the Imperial troops, so long as they remained in the Colony, for the establishment of order in the district between Taranaki and Wanganuiy ■. and I issued instructions accordingly to Lieut.-General Cameron, .which wili be laid before, you. Contrary to my anticipations, however, considerable delay took place, which involved consequences fraught with disaster, and which led to fresh outbreaks in other parts of the Colony. I therefore ordered the Colonial Forces to advance against Wereroa pah — a movement which has resulted in. its capture. . . 1 ■-') The thanks of the Colony are due to Major Rookes commanding, and to the officers and men of Her Majesty's European and Native Colonial Forces engaged in this most important operation. I also recognize the readiness with which Brigadier-General Waddy, C.8., Colonel Trevor, and the officers and men under their command, afforded me all the assistance that was in their power, though preclude^ by their orders from taking any active part in the operations against the enemy's stronghold. I am able in the meantime to congratulate you on the improved state of the settlement of Taranaki, and on the immediate prospect of its ceasing to be a source of wea v ness to New Zealand. For this result the Colony is mainly indebted to the zeal, energy and ability of Colonel Warre, C.8., commanding that District, and ; to the conduct of Her Majesty's Forces, Imperial and Colonial, of both Races, under his commands •> ■ ' Additional prdof has been afforded, - through the operations at Taranaki and . Wanganui, that the Colony may rely with confidence on the skill and gallantry of its A jown officers and men, whilst the devoted 1 courage evinced by the loyal Natives has f placed beyond doubt the attachment of a -large portion of the Native race to the

Crown, to their European fellow subjects, and to the cause of order against tiirVulence and fanaticism. I shall now at once issue orders for; the^ return to England of five Regiments, which I trust and believe may quickly be followed by the remainder of the Imperial Troop 3. The conditions imposed on the Colony for the full attainment of Constitutional Government in Native as well as in ordinary affairs will thus be fulfilled. ;1 Gentlemen of the House of Eepresent- •. atiyes, — * •. ■ :• ■.''■■■ / ■•■. ; The measures adopted by you in your; last Session have enabled me, by the disposal of the Colonial Securities, in a > great measure to>relieve the financial em- ' barrassment in which the Colony was then placed. The credit_of the Colony, however, in England has been and .continues to be in-; juriously affected, by the extent and manner in which Loans have been contracted and. placed for negotiation, on the English money market. You will, I trust, take into your ; consideration . the : means by which these evils may be remedied, and the conditions' under which Provincial Loans may in ..future be regulate^, and their paymentVgtiaranteed out of the General Revenue with, safety to the Colony and increasedsecunty to the public creditor. „ In order to provide tor the burthens pressing on the. Colony, it is my intention I to submit, tq. you proposals for raising additional Revenue by Stamp Duties. | ./; I. trust that by reducing; to the utmost limit all extraordinary expenditure connected, with the suppression of the present JNapive Insurrection, or incidental thereto, and b} careful economy in the ordinary services of Government, you will be enabled to sustain the credit of the Colony and provide for its financial exigencies, without encroaching, materially on the provision heretofore made <awt of the General Ordinary Revenue for the service of the Provinces. 'It will, however, be necessary for you to consider the expediency of modifying to some extent the present distribution of the : Ordinary Revenue between the General Government and the Provinces. It has been a source of great satisfaction to me that my Government has been enabled, by an improved system of Treasury accounts, to lay before the public full information as to the state of the Revenue and Expenditure of the Colony to the latest possible period. I trust that you will take measures for securing; the permanence of this system, and that you will further provide most effectual checks against the future expenditure of Public Money without author rity of Law. Gentlemen of the Legislative Council, and ' Gentlemen of the House of Representatives, — The changes which have taken place in the relative distribution of population and wealth in different districts will render it necessary for you to re-adjust the Representation of the Colony. In pursuance of the powers vested in me by an Act of last Session, I have agreed with the Panama, New Zealand and Australian Royal Mail Steam Company to confirm, subject to certain modifications, the contract entered into with that body for the establishment of a Postal Service by way of Panama. ; I have also entered into an agreement with the Government of New South Wales for admitting that Colony to an equal participation in the, benefits of the Contract upon terms equitable in themselves, and which will, I doubt not, prove equally advantageous tc both Colonies. The completion of thase arrangements, with the liberty ef extending them to other Australasian Colonies will require your sanction. - The recent discoveries of gold on the West Coast of the Middle Island have opened new fields for colonization, and have given a fresh impetus to the development of the material resources of the .Colony. Amongst many causes of anxiety which

have clouded our prospects, it has been to me a source of great satisfaction to observe the steajiy advance of the Colony in population and wealth: I see no cause for Taalidpatmg any check to this, onward progress, which, with God's blessing, cannot fail to carry it through difficulty — temporary in themselves, and alreaajr beginning to disappear. Several New Members were introduced and took their seats. Bills relating to a Native Commission and one to amend the New Provinces Act, were read a first time.

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Bibliographic details

OPENING OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY., Bruce Herald, Volume III, Issue 70, 10 August 1865

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OPENING OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. Bruce Herald, Volume III, Issue 70, 10 August 1865

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