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The Bruce Herald. TOKOMAIRIRO, JULY 6, 1865.

Mr. John L, Gilliks is very much addicted to the use of strong- language, and .always manages to import a strong* personal feeling into the discussion of questions of public interest. He writes as he speaks alid thinks, honestly, . b iijt bitterly, ; under an immistakeable conviction that he is and must be right j and that all who oppose him are necessarily wrong. His effusions are, therefore, very often in ques^. tionable.. taste, and the letter which we to-day publish, is but one of many instances to. which we. could refer. It is evidently the production of a disappointed riian— one whose milk of human kindness has been transformed into g : all by some occurrence or other, azid who views every thing- relating 1 to the subject through the distorted medium of fancied slights, or wrongs. Had the letter- borne any other signature we would have let it pass unnoticed, "for its poison carries along with it the antidote ; but the position which Mr Gillies has •occupied in public affairs in this Province entitles his remarks to the notice which would be uncalled for in regard to those of a man differently situated. ; We have nothing to say in reference to Mr. Gillies' tracings of our Editorial pen. He is quite at liberty to make any surmises he pleases on that subject ; or if it will afford him any satisfaction to find fault with the "fawning servility and fulsome ' adulation" which he so magnanimously refuses to chastise at present. As he says, taste is everything; and no doubt our readers^ will appreciate the taste of his observations on the subject. The next few words, however, disclose the secret. Mr. Gillies, before writing the letter, had taken something which disagreed with him : whether it was our leaaer, or something else, is at least doubtful, and hence the bilious energy with which he wrote , We are inclined' to think that the dose which disagreed with him "was swallowed perforce, long before our remarks were penned, and that the person who administered it is identical with the person against whom Mr. Gillies* stomach now so evidently revolts If human nature inspires the .adage, "Claw me, and I'll claw you,''' .that saying has an antithesis equally true to human nature; and this no doubt will, to some extent explain the cause of the bitterness manifested by Mr. Gillies towards Major Richardson. ■ We have no desire. to trample on the .fallen, or to worship the rising Sun, nor do we assume the position of Major Richardson's champion. Against Mr. Harris we have no animosity, nor have we ever endeavored in any way to attack him. In the circumstances which have led to his : retiremeht from office, he has our hearty ■sympathy, and .we willingly g'vj him credit for earnest and laborious devotion tor the:interests_of ; the Province, while at the head of affairs/ But he has resigned: and a successor. has to bec'iosen. Looking around the, circle of men amidst whom a fit successor might be found, we can only see one to whom we believe the conduct of affairs could safely be entrusted. As we. have said, and as we repeat, even at the risk of again giving Mr. Giilies an attack of nausea, that one is Major Richardson. We . advocate his claims to the t Superintendency nbfc from any private or personal feeling — aotbecause we have been ".dazzled by the glitter of his eloquence, or tickled by a flourish of trumpets " — but,because we believe ho is the best man we Win find atr the present moment, and because the present election may prove an all-important crisis in the history of the Province, — because on the choice of a Superintendent now may, to a great measure, hang the future weal or woe of the country we have adopted. . We advocate the claims of Major Richardson, not because we wish to convince the electors that he is the best ser,vant they can find at present, but- because we. wish to convince Major Richardson himself that, the Province urgently requires ihim to do what we well know he is not ;anxious to do — nay, has refused to do, — ihat is, become its Superintendent. Even Mr, Gillies, while making a series of ab-

.surd charges against Major Richardson, does not venture to suggest a more^suitable or trustwortlry candidate. '. ; ,'.:',• "With regard to' the imposing ' 'list qf charges on which Mr. Gillies arraigns the Major, we have" not space, even ifV.we were willing, to enter into a detailed examination and refutation of; them. Still less are we- inclined ' co answer the imposing series of connumilrums which he submits for our solution. When- Mr. Gillies compares the expenditure under Major Richardson with that under Mr. Harris,' it would be but fair also to compare the revenue under each, and the circumstances and prospects of the Province at'the different periods. When he says, " That no financial account made " under Major R.s term of office ever " showed the real state or position of the ; \" Provinc," he should remember that he charges all his r predecessors in the bfiiceof Provincial Treasurer ;— the Provincial Auditor, and all the members of the Executives who held office^ under Major Richardson,, with absolute dishonesty, — with having, " cooked " the public accounts ' and coun tenanced false statements. He should also remember, that when he became avyare of these asserted facts' he occupied an impor-; tant and responsible position in the 'Government/ and that it 'was his undoubted duty to have exposed them then and there. That he did not do so, is , a sufficient an^ swer to the charges now. When he speaks of the costly head of the Police Department, he should remember that he was a member of the Council, nay, if we mistake not, a -member of the Go-vernment which more "than doubled the salary of that official.; and so on all through the list, he should try and bear in mmd how very imprudent it* is for the inhabitant cf a glass house to throw stonas at his neighbors. " Personal animosity " and " vindictiveness" are words which cut in more ways than one, and the less they enter into politics or political subjects the better. All who have marked attentively the j course of events during the last four years — ail who have known Major Richardson — all who read Mr. Gillies' letter, will be able to form their own opinion as to how far these feelings influence either gentleman, and to draw their own conclusionsWe have not space to respond to the challenge Mr. Gillies throws down, of disproving what he calls his facts, and still less have we any desire to individual--iae any charges whatever against Mr. Harris. We do not see that any charges brought against that gentleman, even ii proved to the utmost, could affect or improve the position of the one Mr. Gillies terms the " man of our choice." We con-, fess we are anxious that Major Richardson ! should come forward as a candidate, if only I to elicit the further details which Mr. Gillies threatens in that case. We do not think that the whip thus held tip will in any way deter Major Richardson from pursuing- whatever course he may deem his duty, but by way of assisting . Mr. Gillies in- getting up the details we supply him with the following trifling fact — -When Major Richardson left office the Provinc? was £32,000 in debt, now its debt amounts to £600,000.

The line of Southern ."Railway -is now surveyed through this district, and of all thej curious engineering 1 freaks, of which the roads of this Province offer so many examples, the line chosen for the Railway throug-h the Tokomairiro Plain is one of the most extraordinary. It would appear that Engineering: art soars above all considerations of justice or expediency, — that- it matters not what interests are sacrificed, — what localities injured or inconvenienced, so that a straight line can be secured. For the sake of running 1 an absolutely straight line from the Gorge to tha South bridge, the interests of the important and rising' township of Milton are ignored, and the line is, according to the survey, to pass a half or three-quarters of a mile from it. To bring the Railway absolutely through the town would not occasion any sensible addition to the length of the line. As at .present surveyed, we believe it runs from the Gorge to- the South bridge, and from thence another straight line runs to the banks of the Tuakutoto. The junction of the two lines would only have to be brought a little more to the south of the bridge, and the line from the Gorge would intersect at least a portion of the township, without even a curve being' necessary. .

We caniro.t. believe that the inhabitants of ; Toif.oniairiro will stand idly by, and see the .... luie yj as surveyed, ■ adopted, ; without entering- an emphatic protest against tha injustice and 'injury occasioned to the town■ship.; . The-, adoption of the present line will, depreciate the value of property in Milton, — will, in fact, ruin the 1 position and trade of the town, and will seriously retard the advancement both of town and district. Milton is rapidly assuming an important; position amongst the inland towns of the Province ; and while it thrives the surrounding' district is pretty certain to prosper also. : The sudden depreciation of any species of property is an evil, the ramifications of which are too numerous to trace ; . and if the Railway passes at a distance from tha township, there can be no ■doubt as to the serious loss inflicted on the 'owners of town land. In fact, many parties who. have erected large business-pre-mises, w.ho are largely interested in town property, will be great pecuniary losers ; and losses: amongst the business" community often recoil injuriously on their agricultural customers. A new township will 'spring up near the Railway station, and it. will at least take some years td attain the si?e of. the 1 present township. Thus a complete stop will, for a time, be placed on the formation of a commercial centre, and'the distinct will' be exposed to all tire evils: of rival townships within a short 'distance of each other. • It has been alleged, as a reason for carrying the Railway at a distance from the township, that to bring it through would involve a large expenditure in the shape of compensation. Of ".course this would be the case if it was ' intended that the line should interfere with the chief business frontages; but this it need not do. It could run through tbte township so as to. afford all the required advantages, without interfering with any especially valuable land; and we are much mistaken if the majority of landowners on the line which the Railway should take through the township, would not gladly give the i land for any compensation the Government might think fit to award them. At least, before summarily depriving the township of all participation in the benefits to be derived from a Railway, an attempt; should be made to ascertain the relative cost of the two lines. This has not been done, and we have, therefore, no hesitation in saying, that in surveying the line of Southern Railway so as to pass Milton at a distance, a gross injustice has been done to the district. We trust that the inhabitants will take the matter up, that our representatives in- the Council will represent the case in its proper light to the ' Government, and that the Government willj'ield to the justice of the claim preferred, and instruct thi Railway Engineer to re-survey the line so that the Tokomairiro Station may at least be in what i s really the centre^ of the district — the township of Milton.

In spite of the dull tirae3 Milton, appears to to growing rapidly in size. There are now a large number of new erections in progress in various parts of the township, i From Mr Vincent Pyke's last annual report on the Gold fields of the Province, we learn that the aggregate value of Mining Machinery in Otago is about LIBO,OOO. Tuesday was the anniversary of American Independence, but there was not any demonstration by the Americans in Tokomairiro. In Duuedin. of course flags were displayed at the various Hotels, on the shipping, &c. ; uudthe proprietors of the Empire Hotei broached a hogshead of ale in the street. ' The first of the course of Monthly Lectures to be delivered under the auspices of the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Society, was given last night, by the Rev, A. B. Todd, on "the Literary History of the Bible." We are compelled to hold over a more lengthened notice, in consequence of the late hour at which the lecture concluded. There was no tidings of the English Mail when we went to press last night. T:e Alb s on, from Melbourne, was due in Dunedin yesterday, and it is expected that she will bring the mail. We have received the prospectus of a new newspaper abotft to be established in Duuedin. -It is to be termed the "Dunedlu Herald/a nd to be published tri-weekly, 'commencing on Saturday, the 15th. If properly managed, the nev, journal may prove # a great benefit tq the inhabitants of the city, and a valuable property to its proprietors, for all must acinit tbafc there is ample scope for another paper in Daaodiii.

The last number of the • Dunedin Punch ' fully maintains the promising character of the previous IsBueB.;; rrr -_r-i:-i".r :-•:-••'■-•- - :-■ "- : •""-; ;\~. Several well-known Hotel-keepera in Dun-: cdin, have, it is. rumored suspended payment: Messrs Cobb and Co have been successful in their tender tor the conveyance; of the inland Mails in the Province of Southland. Mr Franz Julius has been elected Ensign in the Bruce, Rifles, vice Mr H. Marryatt resigned. • .: /••;■• We observe from an advertisement in another column that a public meeting is to be held in the Schoblhouse, Tokomairiro, on Saturday next, for the purpose of considering the Superintendericy; the representation qt Bruce, the Land. Regulations, and other subjects.. ■ ■• - : ' ■;•.-■■■".■ ' "'' The inhabit rats of Dunedin do not seem properly to appreciate the active and disinterested services of the Volunteer Fire Brigade. At a meeting of the Brigade on MQnday last, Captain Hughes stated tha.t they had only L 8 in hand to pay accounts for upwards of LSO, and that during the past mpnth their collector had not been able to get even LlO. . It was resolved to discontinue the services of the watchman on the. tower, as the Insurance Companies had not, according to promise, assisted in payinghis salary. It is a pity that the inhabitants of the city and the Insurance Companies do not properly support such a useful and admirable body as the Fire Brigade. The Supreme Court in its insolvent juris-, diction, has granted final orders of discharge to the following bankrupts :— John Platt, W. W. Edwards^ T. Shaw, S. B. Colls, W. Barnett, W. Greenwood, J. R. Hood, G. Litnbrick, R.. Lambert, F. Watts, G; P. Fellows, Alexander M'Leod and James Gibson, Alexander Aitken, G. W. Miller, J. M^Entce, R Blake, A. Cattabeni and A. Augan, George Green, Hicklidg and N icolle (so far as concerns Hickling). . . . Messrs. C©bb and Co. have been successful in their tender for an overland; mail from Christchurchto Hokitiki. ; The formation of a Highland Company of Rifle Volunteers is said to'be progressing, satisfactorily in Dunedin. Mr.H. E! Glennie has been elected captain.;' .: ._,.". The case Aicken v. Bealy, Superintendent of Canterbury, the particulars of, which appeared in our last, has been .settled without coing to the new trial granted by. the court. The "plaintiff accepts the £700 damages granted by the jury and each party pays its own costs. It is proposed to build a new theatre in Wellington, and several public meetings have been held recently in that city for the purpose of forming a company to undertake the erection of the building. The * Lyttleton Times' is about to become a daily paper, and it is also intended to enlarge the ' Press.' Journalism must be flourishing in Canterbury. Everest and Davis, the Oamaru bushrangers, have been committed for trial on eight distinct charges, viz., Horse stealing at Hampden ; robbery at Fricker's of the Awamoka Accommodation house ; robbery and horse stealing at Little's ; and shooting with intent at James Fawcet Thompson at Marewhenua. A second charge of robbery under arms at Flicker's Accommodation House ; assault and robbery at Geddes.'s Whari Kuri Accommodation House ; shooting with intent at John Myles, William Petrie, and .David Fleming ; and lastly,, horse stealing at Julius's "station. '" ' . .;'; The last * Provincial Government Gazette contains a letter from the Colonial Secretary announcing the acceptance by his Excellency tiie Governor of the resignation of John Hyde Harris, Esq. , as Superintendent of the Province j and also a proclamation by the Hon. Major Richardson assuming office as Superintendent, by virtue of his. position -as Speaker of the Provincial Council. .■■■■■■...:■ ■ The, following table of Population in- the various Provincial electoral -districts, piled from the census returns, is published in the * Gazette' for general information :— Dunedin City, males, 8,435, females* 6,829 : total, 15,264. Shipping in Harbor, males, 492, females, 34 ; total,! 526.. ... Port Chalmers Town, males, 514, females, .425 : total, 939. Oamaru Town, males. 393, females, 331 : totals 729. North Harbor, ; males, -875, females, 659 : total, 1,534. Peninsula, males, 761, fecialesj '503 : total, 1,269. Wakari, males,, 572, females, 542 : total, 1,114. Green Island and Cavershaiu, males, 815,. females, 734: total, 1,549. Taieri, 2,081, females, 1,174 : tota,l, 3,2 r 55. . Waihola, males, 201, females, 170: total, 371. ■ Tokomairiro, males, 1,160, females, females, 652 : total, I^Bl2. Matati, Kaitangata,; and Inch Ckitha, mnles, 403, females, 253, total, 656. ..Clutha, males, 1,205, females, 686: total, 1,891. Lindis, males, 312, females, 50 : total, 362. Manuiierika, males, 1,271, females, 120: total, 1,391. Wakatip, males, 1,878, females, 254 : t0ta1,' 2,132. .Oamaru County, males, 974, females, 497: total, 1,471. Waikouaiti, > males, 1,654, females, 683 : t>tal, 2 3 337. : Lawrence, males,. 2,720, females, 778 : total, 3,498. : Clyde,' males,^ 3,519, females, 595 : total,' 4,114. i Queenstown, . males, 2,45-2, females, 353. : total,, 2 805 Gross totals— - males, 32,692, femajes,. i 5,32 7: total, 49,019/- . ' . „ .

The « Canterbury Standard 3 writes : For the gratification of those who, cooped up all the week^ have no other day except Sunday on which to take a little, recreation, and : "who may be induced to indulge in a * bit of horseflesh'on that day, we beg to state that the collector of tolls, at the gate on the Lincoln road refuses to make the usual charge on Sunday. This, we consider, is a very admirable arrangement. The Electric Telegraph stations at Oamaru and Timaru have been opened; Of the many-absurd rumors called into existence by the coming election, there is one that we feel called upon to notice. It is to the effect that Major Richardson declines to become a candidate for the Superintendency because the salary attached to that office is lower than that of the Postmaster General. Such an insinuation is simply absurd when made regarding a gentleman who since holding office in the General Government has declined to draw his salary as Speaker of the Provincial Council, in virtue of which office he is now honorarily performing the duties of Superintendent. The high wind which prevailed during Saturday night broke the fastening of one of the telegraph wires, which consequently fell to the ground, where it still lies. If there was a telegraph station here such an accident could of course be remedied in a few minutes, as it is the matter is nobody's business and the line remains unrepaired, although the accident occurred within a few yards of the post-office. The annual meeting of rate-payers in the Helensbrook district was to have been held at the Tokomairiro Hotel on Friday last, for the election of a Board of Road Trustees. As, however, only two rate-payers attended, of course nothing could be "done, and the meeting lapsed. When will the Government learn the folly of advertising such meetings only in a publication which the large majority of the settlers never see, and which i 3 not sufficiently interesting to be read even by those to whom it is sent. General Cameron's niece, Miss Cherry, has been married in Auckland to Captain Leveson Gower. The Bishop of New Zealand performed the ceremony, . and the bride was given away by the gallant General. The rejoicings on the occasion are described as being great. Davis and Evereste have been charged in Dunedin with having assaulted with arms and robbed George Murray, a shepherd in the Waitaki district. They were committed for trial. This is the ninth charge on which they stand committed. From an advertisement in another column we observe that the Building Committee of the Episcopal Church, Tokomairiro, offer a premium of £25 for the best design (accompanied with specifications) for a Rubble Stone Church, capable of seating 250 persons, and capable of enlargement hereafter. The cost, including fittings, nbt to exceed £1000. Designs must be sent in not later than the sth of Atigust next. The members of the High School Cadet Corps have presented their head master, the Rev. F. C. Simmons, with a handsome gold pencil c ;se, as a mark of respect and esteem. At. Lyttelton the other day there was a narrow escape of a serious expl<\sion._A cargo of gunpowder had been landed on the Government Wharf, and left there.* afterwards the s.s. Rangafira came in close.alongside the wharf and fired her signal gun right at the powder. Fortunately, however, a crate of other goods stood in the way and received the wad, otherwise the results might have been dreadful. A fatal accident has occurred at the Mataura. A man from Invercargill, named James Aitken, and his son, while endeavoring to cross Menzies Ford, were, with their dray and two horses, swept away by the current Since then a portion of the: load of the dray has been found further down the river, which was for several days quite unfordable. Mr Weld has resigned the portfolio of Colonial Secretary, and rema : ns Premier without office. Mr J. C. Richmond has been appointed Colonial Secretary. The anriual ploughing match of the Taieri Agricultural Society is appointed to be held in , a lea paddock on the farm, of Mr William Allan, opposite Sprinkbank Inn, East Taieri, oh Friday, the 14th of July inst. The furrow.is to be six inches deep, and ploughmen are to find their own feerin" poles. Entries must be made with the Secretary on or before the 12th in-t , or may be made on the ground oir payment of an extra fee o( ten shillings. A concert in aid of the Bsraevolent Asylum is to be given by the Philharmonic Society in the Theatre Royal, on the 12th inst. Mrs W. H, Mumford is to be principal soprano. The official referees under the Dunedin Building. Ordinance (W. LaniHands, and D. Ross, Esqs.) have complained to the City Commissioners and to the Superintendent of the careless manner in which the Building Surveyor ' (Mr Millar, C;ty Engineer) performs his duties under . the Ordinance. It is stated that several new bnildirtgs havejecently been erected in direct opposition to the pro viaionslbf the law. ; and Mr Millar's carelessness .has caused; a .serious loss to many individuals. ■ The complaint was referred toithe accused for explanation. ■■').;• .; I .■■■■■; .-,.••

In the Resident Magistrate's Court, Dunedin^ on Thursday last, Margaret Little so well knpwri in connection with th<j Jarvey case, sued Sergeant Mallard of the Water Police for damages for assault and false imprisonment. From the evidence it appears that Little was subpoened to appear as a witness in the Supreme Court oa the 12th June. On the 12th April Sergeant Mallard being on duty on board the Alhambra, saw Little on board that vessel about to sail for Melbourne under an assumed name. He spoke to her, and she told him that she had obtained leave from Mr Branigan to go. Mallard went on shore, and while there received telegraphic instructions to detain Little. He returned' to the Alhambra and told Little that she must go ashore. She asked for his warrant, and on his. saying that he had not one refused to go. Without using any violence whatever he got her off the steamer and took her to Dunediu where she was discharged after beinsj detained till the Alhambra had sailed. His Worship thought that there couldjnot be a shadow of a doubt as to Mallard having acted illegally and improperly. If such things Were to be allowed there would be arrests every day on nonsensical pretexts. The arrest of the plaintiff was unwarrantable and unjustifiable, and as he was determined that the liberty of the subject should be protected, he considered that he would not be doing his duty if he did not award her damages. Of course he expected that it would be the superior officer who gave the orders to the defendant to act ; as he had done, who would pay the damages. The constable should not suffer if lie had done nothing more than obey the orders given him. Judgement for L2O and costs In the course of her evidence Little sta'ed that she had lost her passage money in consequence of the arrest, but next day the ' Times ' contained a letter from Messrs. Royse, Mudie, and Co., the agents for the Alhambra, stating that on application, and the giving up of the ticket they had returned the amount of passage money immediately after the vessel sailed. Little had also the effrontery to write to the 'Times 1 complaining that her expenses as a witness in Jarvey's first trial had not been paid. To this letter Mr Howorth Crown Prosecutor replied, stating that his firm had paid her claim two months ago. The following curious story of smuggling • war materials to the Maoris, is taken from the ' Hawkes Bay Times' :— " In reading the debate of March 1.4, in the British House of Comnv>nv.the manly speech of Mr Roebuck deserves the praise of all true colonists; and when he traces one of the principal causes of the war to tile sordid few in supplying the Maoris with the means of war, be' states a great fact, arid it only requires looking through the Customs entries from 1855 to 1859 to see the immense quantities of war material imported into the colony .by the Auckland merchants. The writer of this was in the employ of a noted trading firm engaged in the native tiade, owning a small schooner running from Auckland to the Bay of Plenty, trading with the natives with gunpowder, lead, and rum, arms of all sorts, from a George 1 1. musket to a minie rifle, tomahawks, and car touch boxes ; in fact, all the implements of war coveted by their dusky customers. One of their common tricks to cheat the Customs, was t » enter the vessel with pork 'in. casks, and to clear out with empty casks and salt, the said casks containing six or ten kegs, of sporting powder and bags: -salt, containing each about lOOlbs of old lead, boxes of caps, &c. ; all; these shipped in the open day, rolled through Auckland streets, left standing on .the wharf, and sold in the Bay of Plenty. "The old files of Auckland ■ papers need only to be consulted to tell tales of cargoes of empty casks and ton 3of sash weights (leadj of course) for building purposes, in places where the only buildings going up were : raupo whares. The writer of this knew of one whare containing at one time 72 kegs of powder, headed up in the way mentioned, and close alongside an old potato hole with about a ton of leaden sash weights in it. And all this carried on by a firm, whose principal held office next to the Superintendent, and he went home, and with other Auckland merchants who had made their pile by Tower muskets and other honest merchandise, went in deputation to .the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and hoped that the war would be carried on with vigor, and cruisers stationed to prevent the extensive smuggling b}- the Yankees." We understand that on Sunday next the morning and evening collections in the Episcopal Church, Tokomairiro, will be devoted to the fund for the relief of the widows and orphans of those who so sadly perished in the City, of D.unedin. ....-- -'■■■'• The requisition to Major ' Richardson has been extensively signed "-'ii- this district, and; will, we believe, be forwarded to him this week. ... :.-•;. •;■.•■..■. ■ ■ •• • '•" : - :; . ;

I The annual meeting of the Ratepayers in the South Bridge Road District, took place at Mr Gray's on Friday la9t. Mr Gray" occupied the Chair, and the following gentlemen were elected Trustees for the ensuing year : — Messrs John Hislop, B. Martin, John Powley, James Mundle, and John Graham. A writ has been issued for the election of a Superintendent of the Province. The nomination is to take place at the Court House,' Dunedin, on Saturday, the 15th July, at noon, and the poll (if necessary) will be taken on Friday, the 4th of August. The 'Provin^al Government Gazette,' of last week, contains the resignation by Mr Thomas Paterson, C.E., of the office of Chief Engineer of Roads, and his appointment to be Chiefißailway.Engineer for the Province. Mr J. Thomson, C.E., is appointed Engineer of Roads and Works for the Province. The Governor by proclamation has revoked all commissions authorising the purchase of lands on behalf the Crown from the aboriginal inhabitants of the Colony, and has abolished the Native Land Purchase Department. This department is rendered unnecessary by the Native Land Act, 1862, which has been assented to by Her Majesty. The 'Wakatip Mail' says:— "We have before us the prospectus of t l :e Wakatip Copper Mining Company, which proposes to work the copper lode at Moke Creek, and a lease of 80 acres of ground has been applied for. The liability is to be limited. The capital is ~L12,500 in 1250 shares of LlO each, with power to increase the amount. The projectors part with their right in the lense for 250 paidup shares, equal to L 2500. We do not know if this includes the original discoverers. Tea shillings is to be paid on application, ten shillings on allotment., and the calls are not to exceed Ll, nor at less intervals than a month, unless ordered by a special meeting of shareholders. Mr Bradsbaw is hon. sec, pro. tern. Captain Duncan M'Catlum, of Glenore.Station, Mataura, died suddenly in Invercargill last week. On retiring the night before hia death, he complained of slight indisposition, and next morning he remained in be'l. On an attendant entering his room in the afternoon, to ascertain if he wished dinner, he was found dead in bed, having apparen ly expired about an hour previously. Captain M'Callum was well known and greatly respected both in Southland and Otago. He always adhered to his picturesque native dress; and in the early days of the Volunteer movement in Dunediii, Captain M'Cr.llum took an active part in encouraging the formation of a Volunteer force. The weather yesterday and the day before was delightful, in fact, quite like summer, and seeming the finer when contrasted with Monday last, which was, we think, one of the most inclement days we have experienced this season. : The Dillons are. still performing at the Princess Theatre. Mr C. E. Bird has taken the management of the house into his own hands, and Mr .George Fawcett acts as Stage Manager,. On Tuesday evening Miss Aitkeu took her benefit, and had, assfie well deserved, a crowded house. Professor Bushell has again been performing for a few nights at the Theatre Royal, and was as successful as usual. The Professor is about to leave this - Province oh a visit to California, and we have heard many regret that h,e did not pay this district a visit prior to his departure. -. .It is anticipated that the next mail from Wellington will bring information of the Governor having given his .assent to the Dunedin Municipal BUI, and that the City Commissioners will shortly be enabled to retire in favor of a Mayor- and Corporation. Captain , and. Adjutant - Graham, of the Dunedin Militia and. Volunteers, has recently published a very useful little drill book for : the use of volunteers. It is compiled from , the latest edition of the Field Exercise Book and cannot fail to prove eminently useful to all volunteers. • We have heard rumors lately as to the probable formation of a company for the conversion of the Tokomairiro Hotel into a Steam Flour Mill on a large scale. The building is admirably situated for such a purpose, and we imagine that there is a fair opening for another null' in the district. The 'Wakatip Mail' writes— one of the richest claims opened for' a long time on the Shotover is that known as Blunndell's at the junction of Moke Creek. They hay; a gutter, in it with about five feet of;w<ish-dirt* this will wash throughout from one dwt. to three-quar-ters of an ounce to the dish. On the top of this wash-dirt the gold lies thicker, and by skimming it with a shovel', as- much' as half an ounce to that arti le can always be obtained. The few days' work enabled the shareholders to pay off long arrears, and the claim is again free though flooded.' ..'.. ■ The' Molyheux Mail ' has ceapel to exist, :in consequence of want of support. 1 In its . last leader it appeals tj the inhabitants of the . ! ; district" to supportthe remaining.. journal. un-< ; Jess, they wish to sink into oblivion. - ■ '

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/BH18650706.2.9

Bibliographic details

The Bruce Herald. TOKOMAIRIRO, JULY 6, 1865., Bruce Herald, Volume III, Issue 65, 6 July 1865

Word Count
5,616

The Bruce Herald. TOKOMAIRIRO, JULY 6, 1865. Bruce Herald, Volume III, Issue 65, 6 July 1865

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