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Home TALK.

: (Frdm Tlmhe Paper*.)

The -".'lrish have caught ft suggestion that the s Prince of Wales, if resident ipr three nib riths in Dublin, might be either an excellen't'sabstitute for the Viceroy, or stiirbetter, Viceroy for himself, and every Irishman who makes a speech reiterates warm approval. The strong monarchical feeling of the country; which has shown itself time arid again during the worst periods of Irish discontent, is fixing itself upon this proposal" and we should not be surprised to find the odd cry of 'Wales for the Irish,' change into a serious popular demand.

A rather nice point is at present under the consideration of the magistrates of Sheffield. This is to decide whether an establishment for the manufacture of crinoline comes within the jurisdiction of the Factories' Act. The act limits the iiours of labor in those factories in which any process incident to the manufacture of cotton is carried on by machinery. It was proved that in the factory, the proprietors of. which had been summoned for making their workwomen work beyond the appointed hours, machinery was used, though not in the workrooms themselves, and that jn the making of crinoline, cotton thread was twisted round wire.

The latest notion of Young England is to have its shirt-collars made of vulcanised india-rubber.

An exchange of prisoners is in progress at Atlanta, and General Sherman has announced his intention of not exchanging Confederate soldiers for Northerners whose term of service has expired. The South cannot be blamed for retaining these men, who would be liable to ihe draft immediately on their return to their homes, but the non-fulfilment of its contract with its men by the Northern Administration confirms the gravest of the charges that have been brought against it by its opponents.

Her Majesty conferred, Mr Disraeli said, a ribbon on the Duke of Northumberland, because he created a Channel fleet at the moment- we had none ; but the man who lays out £500,000 in building cottages on his estate as inu.li deserves a blue ribbon as the man who craates a Channel fleet, or even at the head of a Channel fleet lead 9 us on to victory.

A learned man find a gourmand has discovered that the best means of cooking food is to concentrate the rays of the sun on the cooking vessel, over which several pieces of glass are laid The water soon boils, and the ccoking after this fashion is exquisite. When there is no sun to be had,. artificial light and heat may be fopussed upon the glass with the same result.

The Prussians say the Danes keep them waiting, and in fact they do not show any alacrity in helping enemies to rob them effectually. The conquerors have consequently resolved to try the efficacy of torture. All communication between Jutland and Copenhagen has been forbidden, exports have been prohibited, and fifty thousand men have been quartered upon the wretched peninsula for the winter. In fact the country is to be gutted, in order that the sufferers may by their cries create consternation in Copenhagen. The robber orders his victim' 3 wife to be whipped, in order that be may pay up quickly. Nojthing so atrocious has been done in Europe since 1815, and the example will exaggerate the obstinacy of every future defence. Had Jutland one range of mountains, the Prussians would even now have to face a peasant war.

Mr Perrins, of the firm of Lea and Perrins, has just given £2000 for the purpose of increasing the endowment of St. Michael's parish, Worcester !

A receipt, in Tasso's handwriting, has turned up in Pii'is, and it runs thus :— * I the undersigned apknowledg-e to have received from Abraham Levy S5 livres, for which sum. l have, pledged a sword of my father's^ six shirts, and two silver spoons/ Alas, poor Tasso ! how terribly hard up thou must have been, in spite of all thj' genius ! The. mystery . of the Iron . , Mask . again occupies .the ■■attention of bibliophites, and .anewand rather amusino- story is circu;lated,in,literary papers this week on the subject rr ltstates th.it the Iron Mask iri- : : dueed-t!te Governor of the Bastille to adjnit a lady, y^h6 f iqr •■' a very large sum fiet-

tleilpn her, consented, to share his prison •life..'.'.. ...A. son, was -bprn, who .was.,tiiansjported to Corsica, in-; thie charge of a perjson who was told that he : came-' di huona parte;'* or, in other rwords, that he wajs well-born. The : idea . started is, that this child was the ancestor of Napoleon I. •

On the afternoon of Sunday last,- in aJ United Presbyterian church in Montrosej,< the respected pastor stopped in about the middle of his sermon, and remarked that he need not go on, as many of the congre^ gation appeared to be lying as if they were in their beds. In order to rouse them from their sleep he gave out two verses of a paraphrase ; and after these were sung the rev. gentleman continued the delivery of his sermon. This gentle proceeding* kept the congregation ' wide awake' during the remainder of the sermon.

A regiment of Belgian grenadiers has volunteered for Mexico, on condition that they are to form the body guard of their Princess Charlotte of Belgium, now Empress of Mexico, and to he styled ' Grenadiers de l'lmpera trice.' Their uniform is blue, with purple facings, grey trousers, and round hat with cock's feather, like that worn by Italian riflemen. They are to pass through Paris on their way to St. Nazaire, whence they are to embark for Mexico. A letter of credit was demanded of M« de Rothschild for the Empress, the terms of which it was desired should be different to the ordinary letter of credit. M. de R., who has a witty turn, it appears, though he might afford, from his wealth, to do without such an article, wrote the following curious circular letter :— c M. de Rothschild of Paris begs M. de Rothschild of Frankfort to place at the disposition of the Countess de Montereau himself and his fortune.

Lord Russell endeavored to persuade Lord La^igdale to resign the pennant Mastership of the Rolls foi- the uncertain position of Lord Chancellor, and paid the learned Lord some very high compliments. 'It is useless . talking, my Load,' said Langdale. 'As long as I tnjoy the Rolls I care nothing* for your butter.'

Wherever he has gone in Denmark, the Prince of Wales has won golden opinions from all those with whom he came in contact (writes a corespondent). At Fredenborg one hears nothing but delighted expressions as to the charm of manner sind kindly feeling of the English Crown Prince but it was with the officers and men comprising the Danish fleet that his principal success appears to have been gained. In the course of his visit to the Admiral's ship, and also to the Donnebrog, on the occasion when the royal party drove to Kronborg Castle, his Royal Highness exhibited such an intimate acquaintance with naatical affairs and with the various details of the service that the Danes became persuaded it was he, and not Prince Alfred, who had passed so much of his time at sea. AnJ since then the newspapers, misled by the undress uniform of a general officer which the Prince of Wales wore in that instance, have gravely announced that the Crown Prince, in the full uniform of an English Admiral, passed in review the Danish fleet.

The highest circles of English society cultivate penmnnship with care and success. The Queen's handwriting is beautiful — flowing, and elegant, and feminine. Prince Albert's biographer compares the Prince to Goethe, who would take inordinate pains, even in" writing a short note, that it should be admirably written. He did not understand the merit of second best, but everything that was to be done must be done perfectly.' . The Prince Corisort took, the greatest interest in the caligraphy of his. children, and few young people write more elegantly, and at the same time more distinctly,, than the Pririoes arid Princesses of England.

From a public docuraeritTecently. isstied it appears that the 6d admission on stuaents 1 days at the Kensington Mus'eiim on which the presents to the : Princess of Wales were exhibited, has realised a ..sum 0f. £1425 l?s 6d, which has been applied to found two female scholarships,, to be called the Pincess-oi.^Yales Schblarships; ,.

The Jlfessager. dxi Mxdk spates,- ttiat ; Ba-^ ron de Rothschild possesses ;the: most ;lolil-' minims collection oir.-beg^iiig; letter^ ;{fhk% any. •fina.'n.eie.r evo? .received; : . Theyjjformjacomplete series. - Among? ; <the 'njirnbießj frs< one lately addressed >tQthek&v^s&<sQ&nn?. ing the very tarHptdng' propoatiori t3Ntvfor'

' tti<e bagatelle .of 50,000 f.. the writer woitlcl, engage to show ; ho w he ; could r prolong his life to the age of 150 years. The . following -is the Baron's reply :— Sir, it. has fre!quently happened to me : to. be ithreatesnejd, with death if I did not ; 'giv t e a sum of. mojnejr. You are. certainly the first that -has ever asked me for. : it in -proposing to prolong my life. Your proposition is, without, doubt far; better and more biumane. But my religion teaches me that we are all under theliand of God, and I will not do any thing to withdraw myself from his decrees. My refusal, moreover, does not in any way attack your discovery, from which you will .not fail, I hope, to: profit . yourself. Regretting* that 1 cannot accede to your propesal, I sincerely congratulate you on the 150 which you. are called on to live years in this world.— Accept, &c, J. de Rothschild.

At the Maryle'bone police court on Friday, -Mr William Talley, solicitor, applied to Mr Mansfield for a summons. He said he made his application under the 40th section of the act passed in 1858 for the protection of the medical profession. It was a well known fact that in various newspapers vile advertisements by quack dootors were regularly inserted. Many cases of insult and torture practised upon women' and ; girls by these" quacks had been brought under his notice. Young women were chiefly' inveigled from the country. Therewas one person niore' particularly ■now that he wanted the summons against: His worship would see by the paper hehanded iv that the advertisement set forth that the person advertising was a doctor^ ; thus ' giving the"' public to believe that he had passed his examination and was duly qualified to act. This' man-got his victims into a room, fastened the door, and then invited diem 1 to sit in what was ; appareutly an easy chair. Unsuspectingly they sat down in this chair, when up started a sprirtg which threw their head and body back. At the same instant an arm on each of the sides of the chair sprang out and caught the woman and held them fast. They were then powerless to act on behalf of themselves, and while in that state operations were performed which often injured them for life. The person referred to afterwards so closed their lips that they durst not speak, not even to their most intimate friends, as to the amount of insult, injury, and degradation that they had been compelled to submit to. Many were the women under the thraldom and fear of such ~men:as the one he was applying against. It was known in the profession- that w4teh these men got hold of a woman in a goocl position of life, they compelled them under : threats of exposure to. fee. them to keep silent. The man against whom he was now applying was known by different names. His advertisements appeared unjder an assumed name, and in them hje called himself a doctor without any right or authority. This was the first of a series of prosecutions that were intended to be .gone .on with in this district. The'silm!mons was granted.

Portraits of Muller, giving: him an. iiri-" pleasant beetle browed appearance, are now; common in the shop windows, mixed in charming' varied with cartes de visite of Lord Viscount Palmerston, the Rev. Mr Spurgeon, the Emperor of the French, Charles Ma thews, Mr Disraeli, Fordham the Jockey, Lord Stanley, Blondin, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Sims, Reeves, and Tom Sayers. The sort of sans-culotte red republican manner in which the vendors of photographs mix up their celebrities, whether ' Royal, noble, ariminal, literary, dramatic, acrobatic, political, musical pugal.istic, or clerical, is really astonishing, A singular plot against the life of the Emperor of Austria has been discovered. The leader of it was a. schoolboy, fourteen years old, the son of a bookseller at Prague. He enrolled two 'brotherhoods ' of Hungarians ' and Polfes, a S himself.!' Fie Vriade the memtiers take a sjolemn oath drilled them : in the use arms, arid dist;ri-" buted to tliero . nieclals.. with •, the words 1 Vengeance 'on the iSmperor.' Each boy received ia ■ surname ; taken .from some an-r ' 'cient/tr agedy . T:he" sucking Brutus, . ho.vv - ever, manag^d^to , lose- his. list of associates^ |. and" \i ' . fell " into the hands of i thje poHcp.' .The\c'ons,equence was that', the r.-Kttle .^qik-,' Spirator ;>vas .appp.eheii.ded and se r ntence|d ■i iThe^dhiirift%^ alive 'tH'the^nVe^tioisi t^otlrarerdn^ni<si%ii He^hL} sdisrcbVei-ea'l^S s^e§ni of nm&k

at the ratexrf ibr^lmiletff'an^noiir 1 . ,> Admiralty says. ' Trynitat^our-expei and. therein s'h»'ws'-ifil wisdom-dnd- pa nag-e'of noveh}V x'dntr-aryiito-'tiie'- rec^i idea of .official matter; be decided before many: moh'ths 7 aYe ■■ c on a grand..scale. Suffice it. that Mr Steel, has:. already ;don,e : what he jjropi on a lake "of fresn water.; i 'Her'te,chn ; i€! describes Ins screw as 1 ( ! compose( six blades iii one frames reversible "^ catching* the back "water as \\\e[ prdin 1 one, which produces a speed. of four Jtir j that ' of an ordinary' scre)v propeller. Th are various biher little adVantagSas^liut think the important one pf ' fotir'.times^ speed of ah. ordinary 'screw is'- qtiite *si cienit. .

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Home TALK. Bruce Herald, Volume II, Issue 39, 5 January 1865

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