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Sensational Murder Trial In Vienna.

A SERIES OF ATROCIOUS CRIMES. (Dunodin Star Correspondent). London, Jan. 80. The trial of Franz and Rosalie Schneider, for the series of abominable crimes which sickened- all Europe when they were discovered last summer, is taking place, at Vienna this week, and overshadows in the public interest all other topics. Ever here, in London, the case attracts a good deal of attention, 'though of the guilt of the accused there can be (unfortunately) no doubt. The details aro briefly as follows: — In July, 1891, a charwoman who was passing through the woods of Neulengbach, near Vienna, found a female corpse in an advanced ' state of decomposition. The only moans of identification were the undorlinen and the hat, the outer clothing being missing. The di§covery was duly advertised in tha papers, and a jeweller's assistant identified the remaining clothes as belonging to his sweetheart. He stated that this girl had, some three weeks earlior accepted a situation in the neighborhood of Neulengbach, and had since entirely 'disappeared. In addition, he gave an accurate description of the man and woman who had accompanied the unfortunate girl to her destination. About the same time another servant girl gave notice to the police that a man, whose description exactly corresponded with the above-mentioned, had engaged her as maid to a supposed baroness in Neulengbach. Upon the way ho attempted to entice her into a wood, .but failing:, took her to an inn, where, after cruelly outraging her, he departed. This accoant was corroborated by a frequenter of the inn, who remembered having noticed that the giro's", companion bore a striking resemblance to the servant of a farmer in" the neighbourhood. It was then discovered that this servant had a brother very like him, and of yery bad repute. The brother was accordingly fought for, and eventually ha and hie wife were traced to Vienna ;

■ Where they wero residing under a false name. Their boxes were" 6earohed, and found to contain -several articles 1 "belonging to the murdered girl. Further onquii us . proved that Franc Schneider had - been a thief fr,om youth upwards, ' and had gradually sunk deeper and v deeper into .evij waj'sj until finally, he bad' made a systematic business Of. murder for the sake of booty. Several attempts at robbery and violence, all more or less success- - ful, were proved against him, and the details showed clearly that he had for: several years meditated the plan of systematical^; enticing servant girls to lonely places far the purpose of robbing them. In his earlier attempts he was incautious enough to raise the suspicions of his victims, so he contented himself with brutally ili-treatiug them. Later on, however, lie became more expert and successful in his horrible trede. During his frequent periods of imprisonment his wife was in tho habit, of entering domostic service, and when he was free the pair livod upon Eosalie Schneider's savings! which were not always honourably come by. In May, 1891, all their money being spent, Frau Schneider engaged herself ne cook to Baroness Falke, while her husband resumed his career of robbery by violence. His first victim •was a servant girl of the name of Stoiber, whom he met in the street and induced to follow him to a supposed excellent situation in Purkersdorf, near, Vienna. Instead of taking her to Furkersdorf, he lod ht>r to Neulengbaeh, left her box in an inn, .and enticed her. into a lonely wood. . During their unfortunate, wanderings they came to a little jihapfcl, whore he directed the unfortunate girl to pray. Suddenly he.' seized hold of her. by the throat and demanded money. The poor, girl, frightened almost to death,, asserted that she. had none, and implored the wretch, to take her out of the wood. It was not, . however, until four p'olook in the morning that she succeeded in persuading the villain ,to. set her at liberty, when he left hex. and disappeared.- A second similar, attempt was ,iuade on another servant girl, but on this occasion also no murder was committed. During this time Franz Sohceider lived principally with his wife, , who hid him in Her room during the Say and at night washed and mended his clothes At length he succeeded in finding a third victim, enticed her.to Neulengbaob. exactly as he had the 'others, .but this time he strangled the unhappy girl, stripped her body, and hid it under a heap of .branches,- .where it \raß afterwards found. The possessions of the victims were in every case divided ..with, his wife, and generally sold. . In June the woman, left .her situation, and from that time was the accomplice and assistant in 'all „her.; husband's crimes." r ßhe now undertook^the task of persuading servants .to ' accept her husbandje. situations, for in 'many cases 'the'., girls, showed themselves unwilling tj> .follow; a strange man into lonely woods, one of their ofaij 4 'aei "naturally seeming to them more trustworthy. Directly, after leaving the. Baroness Falke, ■ Eosalie Schneider set to work to find new victims. She went to .a registry office in Vienna^ engaged a servaht'fbr.the'." Baronpss," and directed her to pack her things and accompany her and herhusband to theplace. They went "to Neulengbach, and as usual entered the fatal wood. Frau Schneider confessed at her examination that her husband .went oiri in front with the girl; and after a 'time returned alone, saying" he had strangled her, undressed the body, and hidden it. The pair then returned to Vienna and commenced the next day to sell the clothes of the murdered girl. Borne few hours , later Sohneider appeared at tho 'lodging' 6f his Tictim and fetched* away 'all her possesions, saying she required them. All who know' the two prisoners swear to ; their identity, «nd declare that they - were very lively.. The third murder was planned and executed in an exactly similar manner, and this time the plunder was greater. After everything had been . disposed of the murdereis took a room, bought furniture, «and established.-; themselves comfortably^ There can be no doubt Jhat the aeries would have been continued but for the discovery of the second victims body, and the consequent , < arreßt of the Schneiders. In every caedr death was the result of strangulation. The most horrible part of the affair is that both man 'and wife showed a porfeot callousness to the sufferings of their victims. After a murder they always appeared in high spirits, and only seemed affected at the smallness'of their -booty, 'which was anything but in> proportion -to the greatnoss of their crimes^ Rosalie Sohneider nftef her arrest in" July last year, attempted to commit suicide by throwing herself from a closet window of the third floor of the prison. Bhe sustained serious injuries, but recovered, and afterwards made •what was supposed to be a full confession, ;bef ore the investigating judge. In that confession she said that it was her husband who committed the murders, and that, although she knew of them, she was not actively instrumental in the crime. On being confronted with his wife before the investigating judge, Franc Schneider, who was infuriated at the deposition of his wife, declared that Eosalie Schneider had planned all the murders, and that his part was only to kill the victims. Under cross-exami-nation both prisoners adhered to these statements, Franc Schneider admitting that, although he strangled the victims, his wife assisted him by administering a narcotio while he held their arms, which the female prisoner, who did not .appear to be at all affected by the serious nature of her position, denied. Both prisoners were sentenced to death, but th» sentence of the woman has been commuted to life imprisonment. The male prisoner was executed last Wednesday.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/BA18920326.2.7

Bibliographic details

Bush Advocate, Bush Advocate, Volume VII, Issue 603, 26 March 1892

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1,288

Sensational Murder Trial In Vienna. Bush Advocate, Volume VII, Issue 603, 26 March 1892

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