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The Bush Advocate. Published Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. SATURDAY, JUNE 9, 1888. NEWS OF THE DAY.

Mr Taylor notifies that amounts due for paddocking must be paid. Mr Catt notifies that he has opened a registry office in Dane vir lce. Mr C. Fetersen has a stray dog that he would like to find an owner for. Mr Gasson is applying for a license for the Beaconsfield hotel, Makotuku, His application appears in another column. Mr Wm. Bierre calls tenders for the erection of a store and dwelling. Tenders close on the 12th instant. Anyone requiring a photograph of the principal points of interest about Danevirke, should call at Mr J. Martin's shop and inspect the views he has received from Mr Hall. We hear that Mr Worboys, junior, will most likely be chosen to fill the office of temporary teacher to the Danevirke school till a permanent master is appointed. A number of., perpetual leaseholders in the Woodville district are anxious to have their holdings brought in . under the deferred, payment system, and are now petitioning Parliament to that effect.. | A cold atmospheric wave passed over the whole colony on Thursday last bringing with it a sharp frost and a heavy fall of snow in many places. Some of the highlaying settlements in the Bush had it in form of a driving sleet. A Cleveland, Ohio, steel mill has put up a big •« magnet" extended on a ohain i from a crane which, when charged with I electricity, does the work of fifteen men { who were formerly employed in lifting billets to railroad cars. A boy can run the new labor saver. Mr Ballantyne, teacher of the Here* taunga. school, has sent in his resignation and will hand over his office in a month's time to Mr Worboys, junior. Mr Ballantyne has been in the harness for a long time and performed his duties conscientiously. We hope that a billet will be found for him suitable for his advanced age. James Rearden, a bricklayer, was yesterday brought before Mr W. F. Knight, one of the local Justices of the Peace, on a charge of fighting in the Main-street, Danevivke, on Sunday last. Constable Ryan fully proved the charge by several witnesses, and the accused was adjudged to pay 10s fine and costs 9s; in default 7 days imprisonment. At the sitting of the Ormondville Licensing Bench all the Commissioners j were present. Renewals* were granted to the Ormondville Hotel, C. Leach; and Makotuku Hotel, 11. Essex. The Beaconsfield Hotel license will be considered on the 30th June next, to which date the Bench have adjourned the court. The police report was good with respect to all three houses. A convict who was released on what may be called a " ticket of leave " some days ago.(says a Vienna telegram) murdered six persons near Temesvar, his wife and child among them. He was met by the people of hia village a short time afterwards while in search of food. A chase was instantly commenced, and he was at length brought to the ground by a stone. He was then beaten until he died. As lynching is very rare in this country, the affair has created a great sensation. Great changes are taking place at the Tamaki (llichter Nannestad and Co.'s) Mills, since they were let to Mr 0. Jacobsen, who is going to work the bush, only, himself. He has sub-let the cutting and planing to Mr Anton Nannestad, of Makotuku and the yard work, taking delivery of the timber at the saw, to Mr Chares Lindgren. Mr J. Nannestad, one of the proprietors, who has be<?n managing these mills for the firm up to date, is going to live in Palmerston, where he is shifting with his family in a few days. Mr F. Jenssen will take up his quarters at Napier, as general manager for the Hftwke's Bay Timber Company,

We hear that Mr F. Elmbranch has disposed of his branch business at Kumeroa to Mr W. Brown, late of Waipawa, where he has been, long and favorably known as a thorough good trades-, mm in all branches of the blacksmithing trade, the, shoeing, department being his Bpeoial/orte. .... "A requisition was hurriedly got up the other day at Danevirke, signed by over 40 voters, and sent to Mr W. 0. Smith, M.H.R., now at Wellington, asking him fo -stand for the extraordinary vacancy caused by Mr G. Wratt's resignation of his seat in the Waipawa County Council. It will be known in a few days if Mr Smith will accede to their wishes. _ It also transpired, that at a private meeting held at Allardice's Hotel on Thursday evening, that Mr F. Knight was asked by several voters to stand for this vacancy in the Biding. Other prominent names are also talked of to be brought forward on the day of nomination. The Danevirke Licensing Bench was sitting to-day to hear applications for renewals for the four houses now existing : Danevirke Hotel (Mr T. Alia rdice), Bailway Hotel (Mr C. Baddeley), Junction Hotel (Mr B. Dennehy), Mangatera Hotel (Mr L. b'riis). They were all granted and the proprietors congratulated by the Bench for the excellent way in which their houses had been kept. The inspector, Constable Ryan, suggested that substantial fire-escapes should be built from the balcony of the Junction Hotel and ropeladders attached to the Dauevirke Hotel. These suggestions were endorsed by the Bench, the improvements to bo effected at once. Our readers will notice with regret that the wife of Mr A. B. Jackson, of Danevirke, died at Wellington on Thursday, after a long and painful illness, There is one painful part in the matter, and it is that the officials at the institution, where the malady of Mrs Jackson required she should live, have not replied to Mr Jackson's enquiries as to particulars of the death. The first intimation he had was a notice through ihe post on Friday night, and he immediately wired asking when the deceased would be buried. Up to the present (noon) he has had no reply, and naturally he feels hurt that he has been deprived of the opportunity of paying the last tribute to one near and dear, whom happily death has relieved from further suffering. The new iron paints, manufactured by the New Zealand Hermatite Paint Company, Nelson, are likely to come into general use and favor before very long. These paints have great covering powers, fully three times as great as lead — that is, 7lbs of the iron paint will coyer as much as 211bs of white lead, and will not flour and rub off. They have also qualities for standing and preserving iron and wood and as a fire resistent. They are cheap paints and can be applied by anyone, i Out of six natural colors three are particularly suitable for house painting, as either by themselves or mixed with white lead, almost any shade of color can be obtained. Mr Elmbranch is now using this paint for his new shop at Danevirke, having secured a consignment through the local agent Mr J. Bargh, who is aoting for the agents for Hawke's Bay, Messrs Baker and Tabuteau. A few words might not be amiss with reference to the Ormondville cemetery, or rather, the approach to it. From the end of the metal to the first plots, a distpnce of 3or 4|chaius, the road proper passes through a veritable slough, so that people visiting God's acre have to make circuitous routes of their own through the bush in order to reach the graves. Women and children undertake as a rule the .loving duty of beautifying and keeping in order the last resting place of the departed -tloo.v_.rvr«*>» «."■>! -crffc^ii » lolt -tin? grftvco lor that purpose. The bad state of the approach makes the journey to . and fro most trying to those whom we would like to see the least exposed to such experiences, and if for nothing else, the trustees should for their sake remedy the nuisance. We are informed that from £7 to £8 would, cover the expense of metalling the approach right up to the cemetery. This is not such a large amount that it should prevent the' work being taken in hand at once so as to give visitors the benefit of the dry metal for the remainder of the winter. Telegraphing on April 13, the Odessa correspondent of the Daily News says : — " Two thousand foreign Jews have received a week's notice to quit the city, &t the expiration of which they will be expelled. The foreign Jews — or perhaps it would be more correct to say the Jews domiciled here on foreign passports, for a large number of them are Bussians by birth — consist of about 10,0C0 families, and the members of these families are computed at the lowest figure at about 30,000. They are probably more — nearly 45,000. Numbers of the Jews are hiding from the police, but when they are discovered they are expelled within 24 hours. The greatest hardship falls upon the Roumanian Jews. These people elected to retain their dominions when Bessarabia passed into the hands of Russia, and subsequently migrated to this southern centre, and they would, it might naturally be thought, have become Russian subjects by the Aot of Session. The Roumanian Consul in Odessa refuses to protect them. On the other hand, the provisional administration here does not recognise them, because they are unable to furnish certificates to show that they passed from under Roumanian jurisdiction at the time of the cession. Henoe they are literally outcasts, tossed from one jurisdiction to another, and. repudiated by both."

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Bibliographic details

The Bush Advocate. Published Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. SATURDAY, JUNE 9, 1888. NEWS OF THE DAY., Bush Advocate, Volume I, Issue 15, 9 June 1888

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1,608

The Bush Advocate. Published Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. SATURDAY, JUNE 9, 1888. NEWS OF THE DAY. Bush Advocate, Volume I, Issue 15, 9 June 1888

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