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N.Z.E.F. WOUNDED

MOST NOW BACK HOME

BRIGADIER KENRICK RETURNS

PA , WELLINGTON, Friday. 'Although there are many sick still to come home, practically the last of the wounded soldiers from the New Zealand rorces in the Middle East and Italy arrived in Wellington to-day by the hospital ship Oranje. The ship brought 653 sick and wounded and 111 protected personnel The patients included seven Air Force and four naval ratings. A number of ex-prisoners of war embarked in England. The ship brought home Brigadier H S Kenrick, Director of Medical Services, of Auckland, who has been in charge of medical affairs of the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force since May, 1942. He said that in five and a half years New Zealand Army hospitals had admitted and treated 120,000 men and women who had been wounded or injured in accidents, or who were sick. More than 8000 cases had been returned to New Zealand by hospital ships. One-sixth of the cases handled by the hospitals were wounded, but they included some British soldiers who were not New Zealanders. Fine Medical Service Discussing the Avork of the medical services in general, Brigadier Kenrick said that the spirit which pervaded it was outstanding. He wished that the same spirit could be obtained in civilian activities. Asked to compare the speed of treatment of New Zealanders with the promptitude which had been so conspicuous in the Allied medical services during the invasion of Europe, he said he thought that the New Zealand service was as good.

Nevr Zealanders wounded in their last battle north of Faenza were back in hospital at Bari, 450 miles away, and operated upon within 12 hours. As was not the case in the last war, New Zealand had a complete system for handling wounded from the field to the hospital. During the Faenza battle New Zealand soldiers were taken by field ambulance to a casualty clearing station. From there some went by road to a forward hospital and others by aeroplane to the hospitals further back. More than 1000 wounded were handled in 22 days from April 9 to the cessation of hostilities on May 2, 600 being transported by road to the forwa - " 7 hospital and 400 by air to the rear. Brigadier Ken rick said he understood that the duties he h~d relinquished had been taken up by Brigadier J. M. Twhigg, of Wellington. Lieutenant-Colonel C. B. Barrowclough, a brother of Major-General H. B. Barrowclough, General Officer Commanding the former Third New Zealand Division, was in the ship. He was a solicitor practising in Dunedin before the war and has been Deputy Judge AdvocateGeneral.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19450811.2.52

Bibliographic details

N.Z.E.F. WOUNDED, Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 189, 11 August 1945

Word Count
437

N.Z.E.F. WOUNDED Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 189, 11 August 1945

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