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QUESTIONS ANSWERED

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT THE IMMIGRATION ISSUE Parliamentary Reporter. WELLINGTON, this day. "Inquiries do not reveal an increase in the number of convictions for murder since capital punishment for this offence was abolished, and it is not considered that the existing deterrents are less effective than the previous ones," said the Minister of Justice, Mr. Mason, in replying in the House of Representatives yesterday, to a question asked by Mr. Algie (Nat., Remuera). Mr. Algie, discussing the Minister's reply, said there was a distressing frequency in the number of crimes of manslaughter or murder, and the ■Minister in shelving the matter under "convictions" had sidestepped the issue.

Replying to a suggestion that motor cars of Ministers of the Crown exempted from the speed limit should have distinctive markings, the Minister of Transport, Mr. O'Brien, said that exemptions from the speed limit regulations were granted to ambulances, fire brigades, constables and traffic inspectors, and Ministers of the Crown. It was not considered necessary to provide for distinctive markings.

The hope that reciprocity in pension benefits between the United Kingdom and New Zealand would be established in the near future was expressed by the Minister oLSocial Security, Mr. Parry, replying to a question by Mr. Osborne (Govt., Onehunga), in association with the members for Auckland West, Eden, Grey Lynn and Otahuhu. He added that the British Government had been approached and an agreement in principle was arrived at recently. The stage had now been reached for detailed negotiations.

"The question of immigration to New Zealand after the war is receiving the fullest consideration of the Government and no aspect of the matter is being lost sight of." stated the Prime Minister, Mr. Fraser, in a written reply to a question asked by Mr. T. L. Macdonald (Nat., Mataura). In his question Mr. Macdonald asked if it was the intention of the Government to, follow the example of Australia, which had made a proposal that British migrants would be able to travel to Australia on payment of a fare of not more than £10. Commenting on Mr. Frasers reply, Mr. Macdonald described it as vague and disappointing. Nothing was being done by the Government to encourage immigrants and it was time it got a greater grip on the reality of the situation. "We are facing up to the realities, said the Prime Minister. "Immigrants coming here will require houses, jobs, and land. Our returning servicemen will require the same. * Surely the honourable member will agree that our own men should have preference?"

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19450809.2.83

Bibliographic details

QUESTIONS ANSWERED, Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 187, 9 August 1945

Word Count
419

QUESTIONS ANSWERED Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 187, 9 August 1945

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