Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

EUROPE'S BURDEN

UNRRA'S BIG TASK ; Some Nations Could Give Greater Assistance N.Z. Press Association —Copyright Rec. 12.30 p.m. LONDON, Aug. 7. The new British Government stood behind Unrra and would do everything in its power to help it, said Mr. E. Bevin, Foreign Secretary, opening the third session of the Unrra Council. He added that no Briton could contemplate the conditions of distress, disease, anarchy and bloodshed that would result if the liberated nations had to face the next 12 months without assistance. The peoples of the world had been stunned. They were just awakening and it was now that guidance and help were essential if they were to be induced to help themselves, in co-operation with Unrra, or to their own feet. It was Unrra's special task to help those countries who were not economically able to look after their own needs. It is essential that every member of the United Nations, not merely the Great Powers, should be ready to contribute to Unrra. Many nations were in a position to make a much bigger contribution in the supplies of food than they had. already done. Unrra should be guided by the great principle of keeping clear of every political controversy and maintaining its impartial character. INFORMAL TALKS 1 "Stage Three"' Of Transition From War To Peace BRITISH AND U.S. OFFICIALS Rec. 12.30 p.m. LONDON, Aug. 7. The United. States Assistant-Secre-tary of State, Mr. William Clayton, who is in London for Unrra meetings, is taking the opportunity to conduct informal conversations with British • officials on British and American financial, economic and commercial policy, says the Press Association. He is reviewing what is known as "stage three" of the transition period from war to peace with the Treasury, the Board of Trade and the Supply Ministry. The dollar situation, reparations and the Bretton Woods agreements are all being considered. All matters will be more formally examined at the British and American financial conference, which it is proposed to hold in Washington. RELIEF SHIP SINKS WRECKED BY MINE IN TRIESTE Rec. 12.30 p.m. LONDON, Aug. 7. A Yugoslav news agency reports that a cargo of 1000 tons of barley, 835 tons of footwear and clothing, and also many stud horses, was lost when the Unrra relief ship, William Palmer, sank after striking a mine in Trieste Harbour. Seventeen members of the crew and some horses were saved.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19450808.2.56

Bibliographic details

EUROPE'S BURDEN, Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 186, 8 August 1945

Word Count
396

EUROPE'S BURDEN Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 186, 8 August 1945

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working