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NEWS OF THE DAY

Postal Victory Marl: Two letters received from England by a Sandringham resident are of particular interest, as they each bear the English Post Office cancellation mark devised to c ilebrate V-E . Day. This depicts two bplls, symbolising a peal for victory, surmounted by the "V'\ sign. "Growing Wings" A father who appeared as witness for his son, a defaulter before the No. 1 Revision Authority, Mr. A. H. Johnstone, K.C., this wsek, said it was' time someone toolc action to stop war, for the sake oi the young. "It doesn't matter to :ne, personally,' he said. "I'm an eld man. I'll be growing wings befbre long." "Are you sure?"' asked Mr. Johnstone, drily. Sheep Population - Interim figures supplied by the Government Statistician show that New Zealand's sheep population increased during the year ended in April by 690,000, and numbered 33,890,000 —roughly 20 I times the human population. There were 19,041,000 in the North llsland and 14,489,000 in the South llsland. The numbers in the various districts, with the increases showiji in paren- • theses were as follow: —Auckland, 4,883,000 (90,000); Poverty Bay, " Hawke's Bay, 7,160,000' (decrease 99,000); Wellington, Waire.rapa, West , Coast, 6,998,000 (151,000); Nelson, Marlborough, Westland, 1,403,000 (32,000)- Canterbury, Kaikoura, 5,935,000 (286,000); Otajjo, Southland, 7,511,000 (230,000). f : The Importance of Farming "New Zealand has 90,000 farmers, - who provide 98 per cent of our ster"O "ling funds, and the welfare of t this ' Bindustry affects each one of us, "said y'Mr. C. U. Flimmer in an address to i''"-the last meeting of the Wellington Accountant Students' Society. In order to show how the impact of farming was felt by all sections of the community, the speaker detailed -: the processes that were set in motion by the purchase of a bale of wool- * packs and their subsequent shipment overseas. "Every farmer uses hundreds of different goods, he said. 1 "and this example of the extent of employment given in one isolated , ■ case is some indication of the total effect of all the activities of all the primary producers throughout the country. It is not too much to say ■ : that all jobs are dependent upon the farming industry.

British Elections A New Zealand Air Force officer, who returned from England recently, said he was not the least surprised at the Result of the British general election. Significant, he said, had been the keen interest of people in Britain in the policy of the Labour Government in New Zealand. British people, on seeing the New Zealand shoulder blaze, invariably opened a conversation with questions about Social Security and its application in the Dominion.

104 th Anniversary To-day is the 104 th anniversary of the laying of the foundation stone, by Governor Hobson, of the first church in Auckland, St. Paul's. The church stood at the end of Princes Street, the site to-day being marked by the Cherton Memorial, in Emily Place. As the city grew, roading requirements necessitated the removal of the church, and a new building was erected on its present site in Symonds Street, with the original foundation stone near its front entrance. The annual thanksgiving service will be held to-morrow.

More Colourful Hedges Hedges should be considerable as an integral part of any garden, and as such they can be colourful as well as utilitarian (states an article compiled by the horticultural section of Massey Agricultural College.) Balanced against the price factor should be such advantages as colourful foliage, flowers and berries, a deep-rooting system to avoid unduly robbing the topsoil, and ease of clipping. The New Zealand countryside, as well as suburban gardens and seaside baches, can be brightened immeasurably by a wise choice in hedges—a choice which can well be made at this season of the year.

R.N.Z.A.F. Composer A new composition, of which both the words and the music are by the young New Zealand composer. Wainwright Morgan, recently received a great ovation from a large audience in the Wigmore Hall, London, when it was given a first I performance by another New Zealander. Hubert Carter, with the fcrnous British accompanist. Gerald Moore, at the piano. A programme note stated that tie composition, which is entitled "In Retrospect," was "written in London, December 1944, while servine in the R.N.Z.A.F. The second movement is descriptive of Sunet on Lake Wakatipu, South Island. New Zealand: and the third of Dawn over Stewart Island.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19450728.2.16

Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY, Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 177, 28 July 1945

Word Count
726

NEWS OF THE DAY Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 177, 28 July 1945

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