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PROFESSIONAL WOMEN

ADULT EDUCATION TALK The fact that when patients were recommended to consult a woman practitioner nowadays the reaction was no longer dismay, was pointed out by Mrs. E. M. Wood, optician, speaking on "Women in Professional Life" in the second of the weekly morning lectures for women arranged under the auspices of the advisory committee on adult education. The same simple question was now asked of a women as of a man, namely, "Is she any good?" Mrs, Wood said that the public has discovered that sex had nothing to do with ability and that women had proved themselves to be worthy partners with men. She spoke humorously of the characteristic differences between the two sexes, remarking that men had never had to stop an interesting job to get a meal ready, or to have a baby, and had therefore been able to "steal a march" on women for many centuries. The speaker recounted anecdotes* arising out of her training as an optician and establishment in her profession.

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19450725.2.18

Bibliographic details

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN, Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 174, 25 July 1945

Word Count
170

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 174, 25 July 1945

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